Shaping healthy cities and economies: the role of clinical commissioning

Author:
NHS CONFEDERATION
Publisher:
NHS Confederation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
London

Showcases how clinical leaders in England’s core cities – the eight largest cities outside of London – are looking at how the services they commission can improve not only the health but also the social and economic wellbeing of their populations. The report describes how Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is leading the work to tackle physical inactivity – which drives higher health expenditure, productivity loss, absenteeism and disability and has an overall annual cost to society of £8.2bn. Across Manchester a CCG led programme is supporting people to address underlying issues contributing to unemployment and help people find and maintain jobs that best suit their individual needs. In Liverpool the CCG is using its commissioning and procurement levers to support the economic, social, and environmental wellbeing of its population. Newcastle CCG is helping to drive workforce transformation and find new ways to attract and retain new staff, particularly younger people, a key need for the local economy. Leeds is home to one of Europe’s largest teaching hospitals and a number of biotechnology companies, and has positioned itself as an Innovation Health Hub to accelerate innovation in public and private sector – through this Leeds CCGs are supporting plans to drive £1bn in investment and create 10,000 new jobs and training opportunities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Subject terms:
clinical commissioning groups, place-based approach, economics, employment, physical exercise, wellbeing, urban areas, change management, health inequalities, social exclusion;
Content type:
practice example
Location(s):
England
Link:
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