Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"williams syndrome"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Journal article

Williams syndrome: daily challenges and positive impact on the family

Authors:
SCALLAN Susan, SENIOR Joyce, REILLY Colin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(2), March 2011, pp.181-188.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The genetic disorder Williams syndrome causes characteristic facial features, feeding difficulties and a failure to prosper in infancy. To date, however, few studies have explored the parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. This study of 14 families, all recruited from the Williams Syndrome Association of Ireland, used qualitative methodologies via semi-structured interviews with parents. Findings indicated a variety of daily challenges faced by parents of a person with Williams syndrome. Parental perceptions relating to the positive impact that a person with Williams syndrome can have on the family were also reported. Overall, many of the findings regarding the daily challenges faced by families with a person with Williams syndrome appear to be similar to the experiences of families who have children with other genetic syndromes, the results suggested that certain challenges may be unique to parents of this group. The authors concluded that this study highlighted the positive aspects of raising a child with a disability.

Book

Living with genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability

Author:
HOGENBOOM Marga
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
143p.
Place of publication:
London

Explores the impact of various genetic disorders involving learning disability on children's lives. Conditions examined include Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Prader-Willi Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Foetal Alcohol Syndrome, Rubenstein-Taybi Syndrome and Wolf-Hirschorn Syndrome. Each chapter describes the physical and psychological characteristics of the syndrome, with case studies.

Journal article

Syndrome specific characteristics in Williams Syndrome: to what extent do early behavioural patterns persist into adult life?

Authors:
HOWLIN Patricia, DAVIES Mark, UDWIN Orlee
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 11(3), 1998, pp.207-226.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Reviews the evidence for a 'syndrome specific' pattern of problems and behaviours relating to Williams syndrome. Although there have been many studies of children with this condition, data on adults is limited. The article summarises available information on patterns of functioning in children and examines the extent to which these characteristics persist into adulthood.

Journal article

Speed of naming in children with Williams and Down syndromes

Authors:
YPSILANTI Antonia, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 31(2), June 2006, pp.87-94.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Williams syndrome (WS) and Down syndrome (DS) are two neurodevelopmental genetically based disorders which exhibit mental retardation with a unique cognitive profile. Naming in individuals with WS and DS has been investigated in several studies, with results indicating that the performance of children with WS and DS is at a similar level and below mental age expectations on naming tasks.  Speed of naming pictures, colours, numbers, letters and words was assessed in 8 individuals with WS, 10 individuals with DS, and 18 mental age controls. All stimuli were presented on a computer monitor and reaction times for naming were recorded. Our results indicated that speed of naming in children with DS and WS is not statistically different to that of mental age controls. However, error analysis in naming words and pictures revealed qualitative differences between the three groups. These results challenge the tenet of increased naming speed in children with WS compared to mental age controls. The findings are discussed in the light of current evidence concerning the linguistic abilities of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and those with typical development.

Journal article

Social competence in persons with Prader-Willi, Williams and Down's Syndromes

Authors:
RISNER Beth A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 17(3), September 2004, pp.209-217.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study explores everyday social competence in the lives of persons with three genetic intellectual disability syndromes. Using parent reports on the Social and Activity Competence domains of Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), socially competent behaviours were examined in 58 persons with Williams syndrome, 54 persons with Prader-Willi syndrome, and 65 persons with Down's syndrome. The Down's syndrome group showed the highest overall social competence scores, while individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome fared worst in terms of their behaviour with others. The Williams syndrome group scored lowest in terms of skill with jobs and chores, and the Down's syndrome group showed the least skill in non-sport activities. Regarding specific activities, musical activities were popular in both Williams syndrome and Down's syndrome, but more participants with Williams syndrome played musical instruments. Compared with the other groups, individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome were five to 25 times more likely to play with jigsaw puzzles, and those with Williams syndrome were least likely to engage in any visual–spatial leisure activities. Age was found to be a positive correlate of social competence for the Williams and Down's syndrome groups, but not for the Prader-Willi group. Implications are discussed for interventions and for future behavioural phenotype work

Journal article

What do parents want?: an analysis of education-related comments made by parents of children with different genetic syndromes

Authors:
FIDLER Deborah J., LAWSON John E.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 28(2), June 2003, pp.196-204.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

This study explored whether parents of children with three different genetic syndromes, Down syndrome (n~39), Prader-Willi syndrome (n~25), and Williams syndrome (n~26), express divergent desires for modifications in their child's current educational programming. A content analysis was performed on the parents' answers to an open-ended question about how to improve their child's current placement. The parents of children with Down syndrome spontaneously expressed a greater desire for changes or improvements in speech therapy and reading services, the parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome expressed a desire for increases in adaptive physical education services, and the parents of children with Williams syndrome expressed a desire for increases and modifications to music services and aides in the classroom. Within-syndrome variation was also found in the specific sentiments and desires expressed. Implications for a syndrome-specific approach to special education programming are discussed.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts