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Journal article

A stabilization group approach for heterogeneous populations of trauma clients

Author:
STIGE Signe Hjelen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aggression Maltreatment and Trauma, 20(5-8), 2011, pp.886-903.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The high prevalence of potentially traumatising experiences in the general population, as well as the increased risk of developing long-lasting and far reaching problems, calls for effective treatment approaches to reach clients in need of trauma-specific treatment. This article describes a group-based treatment approach adjusted to include clients with a wide range of trauma-related problems and traumatic experiences. This general approach might be especially useful in settings with low population size and density, and as a way of providing trauma-specific treatment quickly after referral. The primary goal of the approach is to reduce fear of, encourage exploration of, and enhance understanding and handling of trauma-related symptoms. A brief outline of the approach is presented, notably in terms of the overall structure, the inclusion criteria, the assessment process, and the structure of group sessions. The topics introduced by the therapists in each of the 17 weekly sessions are then described in more detail. Finally, illustrations of how theoretical concepts important in stabilisation work are incorporated into the approach are presented.

Journal article

A theoretical understanding of refugee trauma

Author:
GEORGE Miriam
Journal article citation:
Clinical Social Work Journal, 38(4), December 2010, pp.379-387.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

In order to broaden the scope of theoretical knowledge on refugee trauma this article aims to build on refugee, Post-Colonial, Trauma and Feminist theories, and emphasise refugee trauma as a consequence of multiple historical, social and political constraints which are embedded in the personal experiences of refugees. By incorporating these various theories, the author proposes an integrated model to aid service providers in identifying the various trauma factors associated with refugees, as well as to facilitate the development of efficient service delivery mechanisms for this population.

Journal article

Can trauma cause 'psychosis'?

Author:
JOHNSTONE Lucy
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 150, March 2008, pp.6-9.
Publisher:
MIND

There is growing research evidence that some of the experiences service users report such as unusual beliefs and distressing voices are, in many cases, a natural reaction to the abuses they have been subjected to. The author briefly summarises some key findings and then considers why the results are controversial. The author highlights the conflict with biomedical assumptions, the likely responses to the research, and possible traps in the research that may mean the truth about abuse and psychosis could be again ignored.

Journal article

The humanising of trauma: social context and witnessing

Author:
WEEGMANN Martin
Journal article citation:
Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 27(2), Summer 2006, pp.163-175.
Publisher:
Association of Therapeutic Communities

The impact of shell-shock on psychiatry led to the downfall of a more neurological, constitutionalist model. The impact of sexual and other misuse of children on psychology led to the down fall of a more cynical, patient-blaming tradition. This article considers the contribution of W.H.R. Rivers and Sandor Ferenczi in challenging the dogma of their times and forging new concepts of psychic disruption and trauma. The author describes their ideas in terms of a humanising of trauma. The author asks whether the word 'trauma' has subsequently become over-used and divorced from the horrific contexts about which clinicians like Rivers and Ferenczi were responding? Or whether emphasis on the traumatic enable a desirable, more sensitive approach to self-care.

Journal article Full text available online for free

When we leave hospital: a patients' perspective of burn injury

Author:
ACTON Amy
Journal article citation:
British Medical Journal, 28.8.04, 2004, pp.504-506.
Publisher:
British Medical Association

Presents a personal account of the problems one burns victim faced when leaving hospital. The article covers attitudes about appearance and strategies to help burns victims respond in a positive way to questions and staring. The author now works as a burns nurse.

Journal article

Discriminant validation of the modified secondary trauma questionnaire

Authors:
MOTTA Robert M., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Psychotherapy in Independent Practice, 2(4), 2001, pp.17-24.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the development of a scale for assessing secondary trauma. Secondary trauma refers to the acquisition of negative emotional states due to ongoing and close exposure to a person who has been traumatized. A sample of American college-students were administered the Modified Secondary Trauma Questionnaire, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale-Revised, and in order to establish the discriminant validity, the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale. Results found the Modified Secondary Trauma Questionnaire presented an easily administered measure for assessing the influence of secondary traumatic experiences.

Book Full text available online for free

Trauma and young offenders: a review of the research and practice literature: research summary

Authors:
LIDDLE Mark, et al
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Reports on findings from a review of research and practice literature concerning trauma in the backgrounds of young offenders. It aims to highlight what is currently known about trauma within the population of young offenders, and to identify the importance of this knowledge for effective resettlement practice. Searches were carried out using the internet and academic databases, focusing on young people up to the age of 25. The review focuses on: definitions of trauma and the different ways in which trauma has been understood in the research and practice literature; the prevalence of different types of traumatic childhood and adolescent experiences in the backgrounds of young offenders; the effects that such trauma can have on young people in the short-term, and its longer term impacts on emotional, social, and neurological development; the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour, including the extent of their capacity to comply with youth justice interventions. The evidence suggests that offenders have a disproportionate amount of childhood and adolescent trauma in their backgrounds and that some of the impacts of such trauma appear to be linked to offending behaviour. It also looks at the implications that an understanding of trauma and its effects might have for resettlement work undertaken with young custody-leavers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Young offenders and trauma: experience and impact. A practitioners guide.

Authors:
WRIGHT Sam, LIDDLE Mark, GOODFELLOW Pippa
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This practitioner briefing aims to highlight what is currently known about the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour and development. Traumatic experiences very common in the backgrounds of young offenders and but the impact of these experiences can limit their ability to engage with opportunities and can seriously narrow their life chances. It is therefore critical that resettlement practitioners are aware of issues concerning trauma because attempting to address behaviour without understanding a young person’s underlying difficulties can result in unsuccessful and sometimes counterproductive interventions. The briefing considers the type of events that can cause trauma, the impact trauma can have, presents data to show the greater prevalence of mental health conditions and related issues such as substance dependency offenders; and looks at what this means for resettlement practice with young offenders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Identifying, preventing, and addressing job burnout and vicarious burnout for social work professionals

Author:
WILSON Felicia
Journal article citation:
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, 13(5), 2016, pp.479-483.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Genuineness, concern for others, and empathy are characteristics used to describe the professional social worker. To this end, the social worker tirelessly works on behalf of and in collaboration with the client to move them from stagnant life situations into positive life situations. While the fundamental principles of social work are wonderful, the result for some workers is job burnout and/or vicarious trauma. The concepts of job burnout, its antecedents, and manifestations are thoroughly discussed in this article to provide a holistic overview of this phenomenon. The six antecedents: workload, control, values, fairness, reward, and community are discussed and linked to the manifestations of job burnout. When working with individuals who have been exposed to the depravity of life, the professional can take on the client's vulnerabilities, victimizations, and stress. The common term for this phenomenon is vicarious trauma. Professionals who work with trauma victims can often have issues in their personal and professional life as evidenced by reduced professional efficacy, increased emotional concerns, and physical concerns. The purpose of the author in this article is to provide an overview of job burnout, vicarious trauma, and a discussion about self-care responsibilities. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Animal assisted therapy and trauma survivors

Authors:
MIMS Debra, WADDELL Rhondda
Journal article citation:
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, 13(5), 2016, pp.452-457.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Animal therapy is making strides in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For years, animals have been used with great benefit in the treatment of the aged and the terminally ill. Now animal assisted therapy is benefitting sufferers of PTSD. The results of animal assisted therapy in the treatment of PTSD patients have seen significant results. In one study of the effect of dogs with patients, psychologists noted an 82% reduction in symptoms. One particular case noted that interacting with the dog for as little as one week, enabled a patient to decrease the amount of anxiety and sleep medications by half. (Publisher abstract)

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