Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"severe mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 2389

Journal article

Community treatment orders – principles and attitudes: Commentary on... Community treatment orders: current practice and a framework to aid clinicians

Author:
SHARMA Vimal Kumar
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 37(2), 2013, pp.58-59.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The community treatment order (CTO) was implemented in 2008 as part of the 2007 amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983. Initially, health professionals and patient groups were sceptical about the successful implementation of CTOs. However, as more than the expected number of patients has been subjected to CTOs in the past 3 years in England and Wales, the professionals’ views are shifting in favour of CTOs. More needs to be done to improve the approach and attitude of care providers so that CTOs are used in the most appropriate and effective way for the patients. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Taking over the asylum

Author:
GOULD Mark
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 8.5.08, 2008, pp.22-24.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

The author charts the journey of mental health care from Victorian asylums to the national service framework to the recent emphasis on protection of the public, which some critics argue is a step backwards.

Journal article

Tall order?

Author:
GOULD Mark
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 24.01.08, 2008, p.27, 29.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

On the 1 October 2008, community treatment orders are to be introduced. The author looks at the evidence of whether community treatment orders will help 'revolving door' patients. He also highlights the doubts of many professionals.

Journal article

What price safety?

Author:
ROBINSON Isobel
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, August 2005, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The authour won the PQ category for her essay: 'the psychiatric ward: a place of safety?' This article presents an edited version of the essay.

Book Full text available online for free

Reforming the Mental Health Act: summary

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
London

Booklet combining the executive summaries of the two parts of the Mental Health White Paper ‘Reforming the Mental Health Act’ – Part 1 ‘The new legal framework’ and Part 2 ‘High risk patients’.

Book

Reconstructing schizophrenia

Editor:
BENTALL Richard P.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
325p., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Subjects the concept of schizophrenia to rigorous scientific, historical and sociological scrutiny. Aimed at mental health professionals, and social workers.

Journal article

Schizophrenia : a personal account

Author:
GEORGE Bill
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 23.2.87, 1987, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

-

Book

Schizophrenia: a fresh approach

Author:
HOWE Gwen
Publisher:
David and Charles
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
174p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Newton Abbot
Journal article

Does personality influence job acquisition and tenure in people with severe mental illness enrolled in supported employment programs?

Authors:
FORTIN Guillaume, LECOMTE Tania, CORBIERE Marc
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(3), 2017, pp.248-256.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: When employment difficulties in people with severe mental illness (SMI) occur, it could be partly linked to issues not specific to SMI, such as personality traits or problems. Despite the fact that personality has a marked influence on almost every aspect of work behaviour, it has scarcely been investigated in the context of employment for people with SMI. Aims: This study evaluated if personality was more predictive than clinical variables of different competitive work outcomes, namely acquisition of competitive employment, delay to acquisition and job tenure. Method: A sample of 82 people with a SMI enrolled in supported employment programs (SEP) was recruited and asked to complete various questionnaires and interviews. Statistical analyses included logistic regressions and survival analyses (Cox regressions). Results: Prior employment, personality problems and negative symptoms are significantly related to acquisition of a competitive employment and to delay to acquisition whereas the conscientiousness personality trait was predictive of job tenure. Conclusion: The results point out the relevance of personality traits and problems as predictors of work outcomes in people with SMI registered in SEP. Future studies should recruit larger samples and also investigate these links with other factors related to work outcomes. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

What we talk about when we talk about recovery: a systematic review and best-fit framework synthesis of qualitative literature

Authors:
STUART Simon Robertson, TANSEY Louise, QUAYLE Ethel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(3), 2017, pp.291-304.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: The recovery approach is increasingly popular among mental-health services, but there is a lack of consensus about its applicability and it has been criticised for imposing professionalised ideas onto what was originally a service-user concept. Aims: To carry out a review and synthesis of qualitative research to answer the question: “What do we know about how service users with severe and enduring mental illness experience the process of recovery?” It was hoped that this would improve clarity and increase understanding. Method: A systematic review identified 15 peer-reviewed articles examining experiences of recovery. Twelve of these were analysed using best-fit framework synthesis, with the CHIME model of recovery providing the exploratory framework. Results: The optimistic themes of CHIME accounted for the majority of people’s experiences, but more than 30% of data were not felt to be encapsulated. An expanded conceptualisation of recovery is proposed, in which difficulties are more prominently considered. Conclusions: An overly optimistic, professionally imposed view of recovery might homogenise or even blame individuals rather than empower them. Further understanding is needed of different experiences of recovery, and of people’s struggles to recover. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts