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Journal article

Harm-minimisation for self-harm

Author:
SHAW Clare
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September 2012, pp.19-21.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The dominant principle for treating self-harm remains prevention or cessation. Harm-minimisation, which is accepted as mainstream practice in the field of substance misuse, is still regarded as marginal in the field of self-harm, surrounded by controversy, obscured by anxiety, and heavily resisted at organisational and managerial levels. Harm-minimisation approaches accept that someone may need to self-harm at a given point, and focus instead on supporting that person to reduce the risk and damage. This article focuses on the NICE guidelines for longer term management of self-harm (2011) and their conclusions on the issue of harm-minimisation. The NICE guidelines observe that resistance to employing harm reduction for self-harm has no evidential support, and recommends discussing less destructive or harmful methods of self-harm with the service user and their family. In doing so, they add to a number of guidelines advising the use of harm-reduction strategies. The article includes a list of basic principles that promote a thoughtful individualised response to self-harm.

Journal article

Research unpacked: damage limitation

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, MACAULAY Fiona
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 10(1), January 2010, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article describes a study which looked at how people with learning disabilities who self-injure make sense of their self-injury and what they say would help most. Twenty-five people with learning disabilities and personal experience of self-injury took part in 1 to 4 research interviews between 2006 and 2008. All the participants were able to describe examples of circumstances leading up to their self-injury. These included external factors over which the participant had little control such as not being listened to, interpersonal factors such as being bullied, and internal factors caused for example by particular thoughts or memories. The participants identified the feelings they experienced before self-injuring, the most common being angry, sad, depressed, low, frustrated, or wound up. Over three-quarters of the participants considered that having someone to talk to who would listen to them would help, and also wanted someone to help look after their injuries. Being encouraged not to self-injure was considered helpful by some and unhelpful by others. The article concludes that the results challenge existing practice which considers that nothing can be done, and indicate the need to work with each person individually to help them use coping strategies. Creating conditions where people with learning disabilities have choice and control over their lives is also important.

Journal article

Risk factors and correlates of deliberate self-harm behaviour: a systematic review

Authors:
FLIEGE Herbert, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 66(6), June 2009, pp.477-493.
Publisher:
Elsevier

... included if they also assessed nonsuicidal self-harm. Fifty-nine original studies met the criteria. Deliberate self-harm may occur at all ages, yet adolescents and young adults are at a higher risk. Evidence on gender is complex. Only 5 studies realize a prospective design (6 months to 10 years) and test predictors. The majority use cross-sectional and retrospective methods. No longitudinal study (separately) examines new incidence. Evidence of correlates encompasses distal/proximal, person/environment, and state/trait factors. Many studies report associations between current self-harm behaviour and a history of childhood sexual abuse. Adolescent and adult self-harmers experience more frequent and more negative emotions, such as anxiety, depression, and aggressiveness, than persons who do not self-harm. Two studies yield specific interactions between childhood trauma and current traits and states such as low emotional expressivity, low self-esteem, and dissociation with respect to a vulnerability to self-harm. Evidence of distal, biographical stressors is fairly strong. Proximal stressors have rarely been investigated; protective factors, hardly at all. Despite many findings of correlates,

Book

Understanding repeated self-injury: a multidisciplinary approach

Authors:
TANTUM Digby, HUBAND Nick
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
235p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

This book adopts a holistic approach, bringing together theory, research and case vignettes. It discusses the basic facts, understanding people who self-injure, its phenomenology, overcoming the problem, moulds and matrices, carer challenges, first professional responses and recovery.

Journal article

Advice on...self-harm

Author:
RICHARDSON Celia
Journal article citation:
Youth Work Now, September 2007, p.12.
Publisher:
Haymarket Professional Publications Ltd.
Place of publication:
London

This article summarises the issues relating to self-harm in young people. It covers key triggers, warning signs and what can be done to help those who resort to hurting themselves.

Journal article

Young people who self harm

Author:
GORMAN Fran
Journal article citation:
Childright, 226, May 2006, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Children's Legal Centre

This article highlights some of the findings from a national inquiry into self-harm among young people, 'Truth Hurts', produced by the Mental Health Foundation and the Camelot Foundation.

Journal article

Self-harmers: a group apart?

Authors:
TURP Maggie, POINTON Claire
Journal article citation:
Counselling and Psychotherapy Journal, 14(5), June 2003, pp.6-8.
Publisher:
British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

The author, a psychotherapist, believes that self-harm is ultimately connected to a whole range of culturally acceptable self-harming activities such as overwork or heavy smoking. Argues that bringing self-harming behaviour closer together can help practitioners to identify with their self-harming clients.

Journal article

Complex causes

Author:
FERRY Richard
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 19.1.94, 1994, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Sheds light on the perplexing nature of self-injurious behaviours by offering a method of classifying them according to their origins.

Book

Youth self-harm and suicide awareness: a reflective practice guide for staff working with children and young people

Author:
SELLEN-COLE Jude
Publisher:
Pavilion Publishing
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
104
Place of publication:
Brighton

This book emphasises the importance of acknowledging attitudes about self-harm and suicide and encourages the reader to reflect on how these attitudes can impact on their work with young people. As well as exploring key facts and research to help raise awareness, it also provides guidance on developing local youth suicide prevention guidelines and support within local areas and organisations. Key topics covered include: an introduction to self-harm and young people; working with young people who self-harm; the epidemiology of suicide; key areas to consider when thinking about suicide prevention; and action learning – direct work and community responses. The guide is underpinned by a framework of reflective practice and a basic application of theories from Transactional Analysis. Readers (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Suicide by children and young people in England

Author:
NATIONAL CONFIDENTIAL INQUIRY INTO SUICIDE AND HOMICIDE BY PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS
Publisher:
University of Manchester
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
Manchester

... ill health, self-harm and suicidal ideas. The study concludes that agencies that work with young people can contribute to suicide prevention by recognising the pattern of cumulative risk and ‘final straw’ stresses that leads to suicide. Improved services for self-harm and access to CAMHS are crucial to addressing suicide and there is a vital role for schools, primary care, social services, and youth (Edited publisher abstract)

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