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Journal article

Secure solutions

Author:
DOWNEY Rachel
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 31.10.91, 1991, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The pressure on Ireland's small number of secure units has left many young offenders with no place to go except prison.

Book

Special Security Units

Author:
WALMSLEY Roy
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
98p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Analyses the history and development of special security units and describes the regimes which operate in them.

Book

Institutions observed: towards on new concept of secure provision in mental health

Author:
GOSTIN Larry
Publisher:
King's Fund
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
179p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Support staffs' experiences of relationship formation and development in secure mental health services

Authors:
EVANS Kathryn, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Forensic Practice, 14(2), 2012, pp.104-115.
Publisher:
Emerald

Therapeutic relationships with patients are a key feature for staff working within mental health settings. This study investigated the experiences of support staff within secure mental health services with regards to the formation and development of therapeutic relationships with patients. Ten unqualified support staff, based within two medium secure establishments within the NHS in the North West of England, were interviewed. Data analysis resulted in the identification of three themes: ‘building bridges’ – developing relationships with patients; ‘you do forget what they've done’ – seeing the person and managing risk; and ‘playing your cards close to our chest’ – maintaining boundaries. The themes are discussed and evaluated in terms of relationship formation and development, barriers that may prevent such relationships from being built. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

Journal article

The development and future of deaf forensic mental health services

Authors:
GIBBON Simon, DOYLE Colin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Forensic Practice, 13(3), August 2011, pp.191-196.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper reviews the need for, and development of, specialist deaf secure mental health services. The authors begin by giving a brief overview of deafness and the relationship between deafness, mental health problems and offending. They go on to summarise the literature and the Department of Health (DoH) guidance and provide a description of the current UK services. In 2001, Young et al. highlighted the needs of deaf mentally disordered offenders and the requirement for specialist forensic mental health services for this group. Since then several DoH guidance documents have been published and there have been substantial service developments.

Book Full text available online for free

Pathways to unlocking secure mental health care

Author:
NATIONAL MENTAL HEALTH DEVELOPMENT UNIT
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
60p.
Place of publication:
London

Secure mental health services provide accommodation, treatment and support for people with severe mental health problems who pose a risk to the public. This report examines the extent to which pathways into and through secure mental health services can be improved through the different security levels and ensure a better flow between prison and secure services. It is based on a review of current secure service provision carried out by the Centre and commissioned by the National Mental Health Development Unit. The report finds that secure mental health services vary widely across the country in terms of who they admit and what support they provide. Most patients spend longer than a year in secure hospitals, with a lack of community support for those who could be discharged a common cause of bed blocking. It also finds that little evidence is available about the long-term outcomes secure services achieve for their patients. The report makes 15 recommendations to make secure services more efficient and better value for money.

Journal article

An informal review of the literature on community meetings and the potential for their application in a secure adolescent service

Author:
SHER Marilyn A.
Journal article citation:
Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 31(3), Autumn 2010, pp.282-297.
Publisher:
Association of Therapeutic Communities

In the UK, the term therapeutic community is generally used to describe small cohesive communities where service users have a significant involvement in decision-making and running of their unit. Community meetings are a feature of therapeutic communities, and in secure services may involve regular meetings of all service users and relevant staff to discuss issues that affect the community as a whole. This article describes and explores some of the key themes emerging from reviews and studies about community meetings. It looks at definitions, process, structure and leadership of community meetings, therapeutic approaches and techniques, group processes, evaluation of effectiveness, and applicability to adolescent forensic services. The author concludes that having the aims of community meetings specifically focused and reflective of therapeutic and group process and addressing specific client group needs could enhance their successful application, and that although further research needs to be undertaken on the usefulness of community meetings in secure adolescent services they do have potential value in such environments.

Book Full text available online for free

Terms of reference for National Oversight Group for High Secure Hospitals

Author:
LEECH Jo
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

This document outlines how the National Oversight Group (NOG) will focus on interpreting policy and context across England and Wales as they apply to high secure services on a system wide basis. NOG will advise on the appropriate ‘direction of travel’ for high secure services, taking account of the requirements of the wider National Health Service (NHS) and criminal justice system (CJS). As a strategic advisory body, NOG will ensure that appropriate processes for policy development, commissioning and performance management are in place and working effectively, in the delivery of a national high secure system. The establishment of the High Secure Commissioning Team (HSCT) and development of the framework for the performance management of high security hospitals enables it to have this separate role. The document highlights the terms of reference for NGO and its role.

Book Full text available online for free

Clinical Secure Practice Forum: terms of reference

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health. Secure Services Policy team
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

The Clinical Secure Practice Forum is a sub-group of the National Oversight Group for High Secure Psychiatric Services. Increasingly, the three Trusts that provide High Secure Services are working to coordinate their efforts and cooperate in practical ways. This is evidenced by the development of a single, shared e-based security manual and work within the Clinical Security Practice Forum. The technology behind the security manual will be used for the development of common policy and practice. Over time, the Forum has increasingly been used as a vehicle for harmonisation and convergence of clinical and operational practice. This cooperation is an integral part of the operation of the high secure system and will enable common standards, identification of best practice, more consistent practice and greater integrity in the system. These Terms of Reference set out the role of the Forum. Terms include: to appraise and evaluate developing security thinking including technological developments; and To maintain links with Prison Service Security Group, National Offender Management Service (NOMS) physical security advisors, NHS Security Management Service (SMS) and Home Office Scientific Development Board.

Book Full text available online for free

Absent without leave: definitions of escape and abscond

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health. Secure Services Policy team
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
1p.
Place of publication:
London

This document provides definitions for the following terms which apply to high, medium and low secure mental health services: escape; attempted escape; abscond; and failure to return.

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