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Journal article

Human rights practice in social work: a US social worker looks to Brazil for leadership

Author:
MCPHERSON Jane
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 18(4), 2015, pp.599-612.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Social work is a local profession, however it is also influenced by international trends and mandates from the social work profession. Internationally, social work has recently embraced human rights as a fundamental aspect of our profession, and yet, at least in the English-language literature, there are few practice examples of what rights-based social work practice looks like. For social workers who practice in countries where rights-based practice is not yet prevalent, this paper posits that examples of rights-based practice from other nations offer helpful guidance. The author describes three examples of Brazilian rights-based practice and discusses the possibilities and challenges that face US practitioners who might want to adopt/adapt such models in the USA. These practice examples may be useful to social workers worldwide who aspire to support universal human rights in their practices. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Issue definition in rights-based policy focused on the experiences of individuals with disabilities: an examination of Canadian parliamentary discourse

Author:
BAKER Dana Lee
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 23(6), October 2008, pp.571-583.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

In issue definition in rights-based policy Canada stereotypically embraces a more positive, human rights-centred approach as compared with the American stereotype associated with the USA's more presumptively negative, civil rights-based tack. Since exclusionary infrastructures violate the core values of democratic governance, a failure to address unnecessarily exclusive infrastructures presents a rights-based public challenge surrounding disability akin to those experienced by other non-elite groups. Analysis of disability policy serves to clarify positive versus negative tendencies in rights-based policy, including whether the expectation of a primarily positive basis in Canada is confirmed. This article examines the definition of public dimensions of the experiences of individuals with autism as a case reflecting the basis of construction of rights in Canada.

Journal article

A bold new direction for children's services in Wales

Author:
DONOVAN Tristan
Journal article citation:
Children and Young People Now, 27.8.08, 2008, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Haymarket Business Publications Ltd

Wales is starting to develop its own unique approach to children and young people's services. This article explores what is behind the Welsh model. Features include a rights based approach to improving services (contrasting with a more needs based approach in England). Developments have also been influenced by tighter budgets and a large proportion of sparsely populated rural areas.

Journal article

Child abuse in South Africa: rights and wrongs

Authors:
RICHTER Linda M., DAWES Andrew R. L.
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse Review, 17(2), March 2008, pp.79-93.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

South Africa has extremely high rates of both physical and sexual abuse of children. Progressive, rights-based legislation exists to protect children, but it is not adequately supported or resourced by services to fulfil their provisions. It is argued that child abuse and neglect will not be significantly reduced in South Africa, without simultaneous improvements in the social and economic conditions in which very large numbers of children live.

Journal article

Real jobs with real wages

Author:
GARBUTT Ruth
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 8(2), May 2008, pp.19-22.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

People with learning disabilities are often excluded from employment. CHANGE is one organisation that is leading the way on a rights-based approach to the employment of people with learning disabilities. This article discusses the employment model used by CHANGE which includes: use of co-workers; tapping into people's strengths; having a resources worker; providing skills training and utilising volunteers.

Book

Child rights programming: how to apply rights-based approaches to programming

Author:
SAVE THE CHILDREN SWEDEN
Publisher:
Save the Children Sweden
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
72p., CD ROM
Place of publication:
Stockholm
Edition:
2nd ed.

This resource presents the key features of children rights programming and how it is linked to children human rights. It demonstrates how the Convention on the Rights of the Child can be used as the basis in the programming cycle and as a tool for advocacy and change. It is not a training manual as such, but it is meant to serve as background material at training workshops on child rights programming. The development of this handbook has been guided by the Save the Children Coordinating Group on Children Rights Programming. The group consists on members from Save the Children Sweden, Save the Children Denmark, Save the Children UK, Save the Children Norway, Save the Children Canada and the Alliance Secretariat in London.

Journal article

Plenty of room for improvement

Author:
McCREA Ross
Journal article citation:
Scope, May 2005, p.14.
Publisher:
Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action

Reports on the launch of 'Room for improvement', a rights based manifesto for children in Northern Ireland. The document has been produced by Barnardo's, NCH, NSPCC and Save the Children for the May elections.

Journal article

Covenant model for professional relationships: an alternative to the contract model

Author:
MILLER P.
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 35(2), 1990, pp.121-125.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Discusses the difference between a rights-based view of practice and a contractual relationship with clients; describes the covenant model and implications for social work practice.

Journal article

Youth custody, resettlement and the right to social justice

Author:
GRAY Patricia
Journal article citation:
Youth Justice, 11(3), December 2011, pp.235-249.
Publisher:
Sage

In England and Wales, an increase in rates of youth custody, alongside breaches of human rights inside institutions for young offenders, has been a source of criticism among youth justice commentators. This article explores the issue of resettlement by arguing that attempts to improve resettlement provision for young people leaving custody are plagued with failure because of the way the concept of resettlement has been interpreted by policy makers. It is suggested that young people’s social needs on release from custody have been individualised and equated with correcting perceived personal deficits. The end result is that the concept of resettlement has been criminalised, as young people’s needs on leaving custody have been framed in a discourse of ‘responsibilisation’. The article concludes by considering how young people’s resettlement needs could be advanced through the development of a rights based approach informed by social justice ideals.

Journal article

Social work education in Nepal: major opportunities and abundant challenges

Author:
NIKKU Bala Raju
Journal article citation:
Social Work Education (The International Journal), 29(8), December 2010, pp.818-830.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This paper discusses the history of social work education in Nepal. Imparting social work education and training is a challenging task in Nepal due to the ongoing political instability, multi-cultural issues and lack of social work educators, and the lack of a professional association, in addition to the lack of government recognition for the social work profession in the country. From the perspectives of indigenous and international social work, this paper presents the evolution of social work education, opportunities and challenges in Nepal to further strengthen the social work profession there. The paper is divided into four sections. After a general introduction, section two discusses the evolution of social work education in the context of the development of higher education in Nepal. The paper describes Nepal and its changing social context, the challenges for social work and how social work education is meeting these challenges. Nepal's efforts to realise indigenous and international practices of social work education are discussed in the third section. The paper presents a Nepalese model of social work in section four. It concludes that social work training in Nepal should progress from clinical and community development approaches to macro social work issues using rights-based approaches.

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