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Journal article

Village people

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 5.05.05, 2005, pp.40-41.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Despite government backing, care villages still stir opposition from locals. Looks at how a retirement village in Milton Keynes gained approval.

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Retirement housing 2016

Authors:
GILMORE Grainne, et al
Publisher:
Knight Frank
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
London

Examines the demand and supply for purpose-built housing for older people across the UK. It includes an analysis of the equity release potential of downsizing, as well as highlighting the planning landscape for the retirement housing sector. It is estimated that by 2039, one in 12 people will be aged 80 or over. The report reveals that just 3 per cent of new-build units in the pipeline or currently under construction are designated ‘elderly’ or ‘sheltered’ housing. It argues that supply of retirement housing needs to increase five-fold while downsizing to a home with one less bedroom will release around £52,000 in equity on average across England and Wales, with large regional variations. The report outlines the current demographic trends and the impact of an ageing population, the role of housing and the supply side of the housing market, and how the policy framework should address the lack of housing for older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Perceived challenges to the sustainability of community-based aging initiatives: findings from a National study of villages

Authors:
LEHNING Amanda, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(7-8), 2015, pp.684-702.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Concerns have been raised regarding the sustainability of villages, an expanding set of organizations that typically use a participant-directed approach to improve older adults’ quality of life and ability to age in place. Using online survey and telephone-interview data from a 2013 follow-up study of villages across the United States, this study examined organisational leaders' perceptions of the major challenges to sustainability. Major challenges identified included: (a) funding, (b) membership recruitment, (c) leadership development, (d) meeting members’ service needs, and (e) limitations of the village model itself. Findings point to a number of important considerations for the development, implementation, and sustainability of the village model, including the role of social workers in addressing these challenges. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring the age-friendliness of purpose-built retirement communities: evidence from England

Authors:
LIDDLE Jennifer, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 34(9), 2014, pp.1601-1629.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article providing empirical evidence concerning the relative age-friendliness of purpose-built retirement communities. Adopting a new definition – ‘underpinned by a commitment to respect and social inclusion, an age-friendly community is engaged in a strategic and ongoing process to facilitate active ageing by optimising the community's physical and social environments and its supporting infrastructure’ – the article analyses the age-friendliness of one retirement community in England. The Longitudinal Study of Ageing in a Retirement Community (LARC) encompassed two waves of a survey with residents, interviews and focus groups with stakeholders involved in staffing, managing and designing the community, and other qualitative data collected from residents. Reviewing the different data sources, the article argues that purpose-built retirement communities have the potential to be age-friendly settings but might better involve residents in a regular cycle of planning, implementation, evaluation and continual improvement if they are to facilitate active ageing. In addition, more clarity is needed on how such developments can better fit with the age-friendly agenda, particularly in terms of their capacity to support ageing in place, the accessibility of the wider neighbourhood, opportunities for intergenerational interactions, and the training of staff to work with older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Acceptance in the domestic environment: the experience of senior housing for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender seniors

Author:
SULLIVAN Kathleen M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 57(2-4), 2014, pp.235-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The social environment impacts the ability of older adults to interact successfully with their community and age-in-place. This study asked, for the first time, residents of existing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) senior living communities to explain why they chose to live in those communities and what, if any, benefit the community afforded them. Focus groups were conducted at 3 retirement communities. Analysis found common categories across focus groups that explain the phenomenon of LGBT senior housing. Acceptance is paramount for LGBT seniors and social networks expanded, contrary to socioemotional selectivity theory. Providers are encouraged to develop safe spaces for LGBT seniors. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Then and now: evolving community in the context of a retirement village

Authors:
BERNARD Miriam, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 32(1), January 2012, pp.103-129.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Whilst there has been considerable research into retirement villages in the United States and Australia, there is little data in the United Kingdom about what it is like to live in retirement communities, how they evolve over time and whether they enhance people's lifestyle aspirations and quality of life. This paper examines these issues through the lens of ‘community’ and in the context of Denham Garden Village: a purpose-built retirement village in Buckinghamshire. Interviews were held with 52 residents and 16 individuals associated with a variety of organisations involved in the (re)development of the retirement village. The paper focuses on how community was conceptualised, experienced and understood both in the early days of the village, and now subsequent to its redevelopment. In conclusion, the authors suggest that the findings question the extent to which community evolves over time and raise important questions about how socially cohesive such retirement villages are.

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Housing markets and independence in old age: expanding the opportunities

Authors:
BALL Michael, et al
Publisher:
University of Reading. Henley Business School
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
Reading

This report presents findings from research on housing for older people who live in specialist private retirement accommodation, called owner occupied retirement housing (OORH). This type of housing is purchased, on a leasehold basis, and found in specially designed blocks of apartments which have communal facilities, house managers and other networks of support integrated within them. There are currently around 105,000 OORH houses in the UK, about 2% of the total number of homes for those aged 65 and over. Findings revealed a higher quality of life for residents and their families. The report notes that 92% of OORH residents are very happy or contented and the great majority would recommend the accommodation to others. OORH was environmentally better than traditional housing, with reduced energy use, including less travel. The report states that 51% of OORH residents said that their energy bills were noticeably less. Also, most OORH residents have family and friends in the locality. Older people form an important part of the core of most communities. This report suggests that far more elderly people could benefit from this type of accommodation than live in it now. However, due to restrictive planning and housing policies, many older people are not being provided with the opportunity to purchase OORH.

Journal article

The naturally occurring retirement community (NORC) initiative in Georgia: developing and managing collaborative partnerships to support older adults

Authors:
IVERY Jan M., AKSTEIN-KAHAN Deborah
Journal article citation:
Administration in Social Work, 34(4), September 2010, pp.329-343.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Collaborative partnerships are essential for community-based services for older adults. These come about in response to a rapidly expanding senior population, diminishing public and private resources, and the rising costs of long-term care. Instead of moving older adults to more restrictive, and often expensive, settings, there is a shift toward developing programmes that promote aging in place. Naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs) have emerged as a collaborative model of care designed to support older adults so they can remain in their homes as long as possible and avoid moving to more restrictive settings. This article examines NORC model replication and discusses the lessons learned from developing strategic partnerships, participant recruitment, programme and partnership management, and evaluation. This paper aims to contribute to the growing literature on the NORC model in diverse settings.

Journal article

Recruiting older adults into a physical activity promotion program: active living every day offered in a naturally occurring retirement community

Authors:
HILDEBRAND Mary, NEUFELD Peggy
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 49(5), October 2009, pp.702-710.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Recruitment strategies used to encourage older people living in the naturally occurring retirement community of St. Louis, Missouri, to enrol in the Active Living Every Day (ALED) program were explored in this practice concept paper. The reasons for enrolment or non enrolment of 25 ALED participants and 25 nonparticipants were collated. There was a significant difference between the two groups’ responses to a physical activity state-of-change question. Common themes for participation included motivation to exercise, physical activity ideas from peers, social engagement and trust in the sponsoring organisations’ staff and programs, while cost and schedule issues often resulted in non enrolment. There were no significant differences between the two groups in their demographics, social resources or in their mood/depressive states. The authors conclude that proactive recruitment methods based on the more stage sensitive transtheoretical model (TTM) approach, as used here, produce greater numbers of ALED participants than reactive recruitment methods alone, such as advertising and announcing programs. The importance of a neighbourhood approach and the influence of peers was highlighted.

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The future of extra care and retirement housing

Author:
HANOVER
Publisher:
Hanover Group
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
Staines

It is now 20 years since Hanover Housing Association built its first Extra Care housing project. This paper, written by Hanover’s Chair and Chief Executive, considers whether Extra Care has been a good model for providing housing for older people and if the concept of Extra Care housing is the best approach for the future. He concludes that Extra Care housing has been highly successful and meets the needs and aspirations of its residents. However, in this more austere financial environment economies are needed and this paper looks at the areas of on-site care, communal facilities, and the meal service to see where savings can be made. The aim for the future is to provide more cost-effective services that meet aspirations for independence and fit comfortably with the principles of personalisation.

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