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Journal article

Psychological mechanisms and the ups and downs of personal recovery in bipolar disorder

Authors:
DODD Alyson L., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 56(3), 2017, pp.310-328.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Personal recovery is recognized as an important outcome for individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) and is distinct from symptomatic and functional recovery. Recovery-focused psychological therapies show promise. As with therapies aiming to delay relapse and improve symptoms, research on the psychological mechanisms underlying recovery is crucial to inform effective recovery-focused therapy. However, empirical work is limited. This study investigated whether negative beliefs about mood swings and self-referent appraisals of mood-related experiences were negatively associated with personal recovery. Design: Cross-sectional online survey. Method: People with a verified research diagnosis of BD (n = 87), recruited via relevant voluntary sector organizations and social media, completed online measures. Pearson's correlations and multiple regression analysed associations between appraisals, beliefs, and recovery. Results: Normalizing appraisals of mood changes were positively associated with personal recovery. Depression, negative self-appraisals of depression-relevant experiences, extreme positive and negative appraisals of activated states, and negative beliefs about mood swings had negative relationships with recovery. After controlling for current mood symptoms, negative illness models, being employed and recent experience of depression predicted recovery. Limitations: Due to the cross-sectional design, causality cannot be determined. Participants were a convenience sample primarily recruited online. Power was limited by the sample size. Conclusions: Interventions aiming to empower people to feel able to manage mood and catastrophize less about mood swings could facilitate personal recovery in people with BD, which might be achieved in recovery-focused therapy. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

What we talk about when we talk about recovery: a systematic review and best-fit framework synthesis of qualitative literature

Authors:
STUART Simon Robertson, TANSEY Louise, QUAYLE Ethel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(3), 2017, pp.291-304.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: The recovery approach is increasingly popular among mental-health services, but there is a lack of consensus about its applicability and it has been criticised for imposing professionalised ideas onto what was originally a service-user concept. Aims: To carry out a review and synthesis of qualitative research to answer the question: “What do we know about how service users with severe and enduring mental illness experience the process of recovery?” It was hoped that this would improve clarity and increase understanding. Method: A systematic review identified 15 peer-reviewed articles examining experiences of recovery. Twelve of these were analysed using best-fit framework synthesis, with the CHIME model of recovery providing the exploratory framework. Results: The optimistic themes of CHIME accounted for the majority of people’s experiences, but more than 30% of data were not felt to be encapsulated. An expanded conceptualisation of recovery is proposed, in which difficulties are more prominently considered. Conclusions: An overly optimistic, professionally imposed view of recovery might homogenise or even blame individuals rather than empower them. Further understanding is needed of different experiences of recovery, and of people’s struggles to recover. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Reflections on the social model of distress or madness: how to make the social model of disability accessible to people with mental health challenges

Author:
KINN Angela
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(4), 2016, pp.231-237.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between recovery approaches and the social model of disability developed within the broader disability movement. Design/methodology/approach: Personal narrative and reflective account written from the perspective of a senior peer trainer with reference to selected literature. Findings: It is important to embrace a social model and rights-based approach within recovery approaches. Originality/value: An original viewpoint on the perspective of a peer trainer linking recovery approaches to the social model and rights-based approach developed within the broader disability arena. (Publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Peer support roles in mental health services

Author:
CHRISTIE Louise
Publisher:
IRISS
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This Insight briefing provides an overview of peer support roles in mental health services and the role they can play in supporting both their own recovery and the recovery of other people. The briefing discusses the way peer support roles are being developed and the potential for further growth across all types of mental health services It also draws on research evidence to identify (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A voyage of discovery: setting up a recovery college in a secure setting

Authors:
FRAYN Elizabeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(1), 2016, pp.29-35.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The potential transformative role of recovery colleges is well-documented in community mental health settings. The purpose of this paper is to reproduce the principles of the recovery college approach in a forensic setting in Devon. Design/methodology/approach: This paper describes the inaugural two-year development process, from ideas to a functioning service, accessible to patients in both medium secure, low and open settings on the Langdon hospital site, drawing on qualitative accounts from staff and service users involved. Findings: Creating and maintaining an educational space within the forensic environment where people have real choices to learn and work on their recovery is possible and valued by service users and clinicians alike. Originality/value: Langdon was one of the first forensic hospitals in the UK to introduce a recovery college, and the report of the positive impact and challenges involved may be useful to others setting out on this journey. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Natural recovery from cannabis use in people with psychosis: a qualitative study

Authors:
REBGETZ Shane, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dual Diagnosis, 11(3/4), 2015, pp.179-183.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Objective: There is rapidly growing evidence of natural recovery from cannabis use in people with psychosis, but little is known about how it occurs. This qualitative study explores what factors influence the decision to cease cannabis use, maintain cessation, and prevent relapse. Methods: Ten people with early psychosis and lifetime cannabis misuse, who had been abstinent for at least a month, (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Sources of meaning derived from occupational engagement for people recovering from mental illness

Authors:
HANCOCK Nicola, HONEY Anne, BUNDY Anita C.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 78(8), 2015, pp.508-515.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Introduction: Engagement in meaningful occupations is of central importance in mental health recovery. The purpose of this study was to gain a richer understanding of the relationships between occupations, sources of meaning and recovery for people living with mental illness. Method: People living with mental illness (n = 78) attending an Australian Clubhouse completed the recovery assessment skills/personal development; time use/routine; financial gain and fun/pleasure. Neither the occupations identified as most meaningful nor the source of meaning differed depending on level of recovery. Conclusion: Irrespective of stage of recovery, socially derived aspects of meaning are most frequently prioritized by people living with mental illness. In facilitating engagement in personally meaningful (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Home comforts

Author:
McGINLEY John
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Supported housing combined with personalised support service can play a vital role in helping people with mental illness in their recovery. This article looks at examples of supported housing provided by Sanctuary Supported Living and how providing personalised support geared to the individual provides clients with a step-down approach to help them move towards independent living. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A day in the life of a peer support worker: Graham

Author:
WATSON Emma
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 19(3), 2015, pp.114-118.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper describes the experience of being a peer support worker by drawing reflections from a working day. It is a reflexive account written from the peer support worker’s own perspective. Reflections focus on the "non-directive" element of peer support and the danger of making assumptions when supporting others and working with staff. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Breadwinners

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Better Health Bakery provides people overcoming mental health issues with an opportunity to do work in a thriving business, gaining new skills and move closer to employment. It was created by the social enterprise arm of the charity Centre for Better Health based in the London Borough of Hackney. This article reports on how the bakery manages the trainee baker' 12 week placements, the role of volunteers within the bakery, and how they help their trainee bakers when the placement ends. (Edited publisher abstract)

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