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Book Full text available online for free

Mental health in Scotland: improving the physical health of those with a mental illness

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Government
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
36p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Government is undertaking a consultation on the draft report, Improving the Physical Health of those with Mental Illness. Among other issues the draft report covers and includes: the evidence base on the need for change, aspects of care management, proposals for review of performance, and steps to ensuring equity and other dimensions. The report also makes six recommendations for forward attention and action to bring about early change and improvement.

Book

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a practical guide; also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy and peroneal muscular atrophy

Author:
NORTHERN Andrew
Publisher:
CMT International
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
113p.
Place of publication:
Penarth

Charcot-Marie-Thooth disease (CMT) causes a deterioration of the peripheral nerves which control sensory information and muscle function in the hands, forearms, lower legs and feet. This can lead to foot bone abnormalities such as high arches and hammer toes, foot drop walking gait, scoliosis (curvature of the spine), muscle cramping, problems with balance and hand function, and the loss of some normal reflexes. Written by members of the CMT support group, this book looks at genetic and medical issues; living with CMT; and practical issues.

Journal article

Bad vibrations

Authors:
BRYAN Jenny, BERLINER Howard
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 2.4.98, 1998, pp.32-34.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Reports on how attempts to abolish RSI as an umbrella term and instead define a series of disorders with specific diagnoses could have a significant impact on the management of occupational health both here and in the US, where RSI accounts for more than half of all reported occupational illness.

Book

Unemployment and health: a disaster and a challenge

Author:
SMITH Richard
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
197p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Oxford
Book

Keeping children healthy: the role of mothers and professionals

Author:
MAYALL Berry
Publisher:
Allen and Unwin
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
258p., tables.
Place of publication:
London
Book

From asthma to thalassaemia : medical conditions in childhood

Editor:
CURTIS Sarah
Publisher:
British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
159p., tables, list of organis
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Learning disability health toolkit

Author:
TURNING POINT
Publisher:
Turning Point
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
111
Place of publication:
Leamington Spa

This toolkit is designed to help making sure that people with learning disabilities are healthy and well, improving the knowledge, skills and confidence of staff in advocating and monitoring the healthcare needs of people with learning difficulties. The toolkit provides essential information around consent and capacity, primary and secondary care and mental health. It describes a number of common medical conditions, including conditions relating to men’s health and women’s health, and explains in detail what to look for, what actions to take and how to monitor effectively. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental and physical illness in caregivers: results from an English national survey sample

Authors:
SMITH Lindsay, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 205(3), 2014, pp.197-203.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Aims: This study investigates the relationship between weekly time spent caregiving and psychiatric and physical morbidity in a representative sample of the population of England. Method: Primary outcome measures were obtained from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007. Self-report measures of mental and physical health were used, along with total symptom scores for common mental disorder derived from the Clinical Interview Schedule - Revised. Results: In total, 25% (n = 1883) of the sample identified themselves as caregivers. They had poorer mental health and higher psychiatric symptom scores than non-caregivers. There was an observable decline in mental health above 10 h per week. A twofold increase in psychiatric symptom scores in the clinical range was recorded in those providing care for more than 20 h per week. In adjusted analyses, there was no excess of physical disorders in caregivers. Conclusions: Strong evidence was found that caregiving affects the mental health of caregivers. Distress frequently reaches clinical thresholds, particularly in those providing most care. Strategies for maintaining the mental health of caregivers are needed, particularly as demographic changes are set to increase involvement in caregiving roles. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Combined effects of physical illness and comorbid psychiatric disorder on risk of suicide in a national population study

Authors:
QIN Ping, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 204(6), 2014, pp.430-435.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Background: People with physical illness often have psychiatric disorder and this comorbidity may have a specific influence on their risk of suicide. Aims: To examine how physical illness and psychiatric comorbidity interact to influence risk of suicide, with particular focus on relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Method: Based on the national population of Denmark, individual-level data were retrieved from five national registers on 27 262 suicide cases and 468 007 gender- and birth-date matched living controls. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results: Both suicides and controls with physical illness more often had comorbid psychiatric disorder than their physically healthy counterparts. Although both physical and psychiatric illnesses constituted significant risk factors for suicide, their relative timing of onset in individuals with comorbidity significantly differentiated the associated risk of suicide. While suicide risk was highly elevated when onsets of both physical and psychiatric illness occurred close in time to each other, regardless which came first, psychiatric comorbidity developed some time after onset of physical illness exacerbated the risk of suicide substantially. Conclusions: Suicide risk in physically ill people varies substantially by presence of psychiatric comorbidity, particularly the relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Closer collaboration between general and mental health services should be an essential component of suicide prevention strategies. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Problematic social support from patients’ perspective: the case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Authors:
MAZZONI Davide, CICOGNANI Elvira
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Health Care, 53(5), 2014, pp.435-445.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Several studies demonstrated the importance of psychosocial factors, like social support, for understanding the experience of people with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Less information is available on “problematic support”; that is, instances of support that are perceived as non-supportive, even though the provider’s actions may be well intended. Aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of problematic support from SLE patients’ perspective. Nine women with SLE were interviewed and transcripts were analysed through qualitative content analysis. Three main types of problematic social support were indentified. Oppressive support describes social support offers characterised by excessive worries and unwanted advices. Support denying the illness is characterised by a neglect of the disease or of its consequences. Support based on divergent illness representations is perceived as not punctual and not in line with patients’ actual clinical condition. This study confirms the complexity of providing useful support to SLE patients and suggest that also people living close to patients should represent a target of interventions. (Edited publisher abstract)

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