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Journal article

Borderline personality disorders (BPD) and its link with anti-social personality disorders

Author:
LOWENSTEIN Ludwig
Journal article citation:
Justice of the Peace, 26.01.08, 2008, pp.50-54.
Publisher:
Butterworth

The prevalence of the problem of association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and its link with anti-social personality disorders (APD) is still relatively unknown. This article analyses the literature and attempts to separate the inter-reacting facets. Thirteen different facets are discussed: 1) differentiation by gender; 2) signs in childhood and adolescence; 3) impulsivity and aggression including domestic violence; 4) physical and sexual abuse and health; 5) alcohol and other substance abusing; 6) attachment patterns; 7) socio-cultural factors; 8) genetic and neuro-cognitive factors; 9) depressions, self-harming and suicidal behaviour; 10) pathological gambling; 11) anti-social behaviour; 12) family factors; and 13) interaction of causes and associated features. It is concluded that there is a constant interaction between the various causal factors but a definite causal links cannot be fully established.

Journal article

Identity crisis

Author:
SALMON Mary
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, April 2011, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The condition of dissociative identity disorder, formerly known as multiple personality disorder, and the reasons the condition often goes undiagnosed are discussed.

Book

Borderline personality disorder

Authors:
KRAWITZ Roy, JACKSON Wendy
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
253p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oxford

This book in "The facts" series is by a therapist and a recovered patient. The first section gives information: the history of BPD, what it is, understanding it, other associated problems and diagnoses, causes, understanding self-harm, prognosis and treatment effectiveness. Section 2 covers recovery frameworks: change, psychological treatments, what to expect, first contact with professionals, choosing a therapist, developing a therapy agreement, support network, assessment, goals and plan, therapy relationship, taking charge of recovery, power struggles and beyond, prioritising therapy focus, preparing for crises, medication and hospitalisation. Section 3 is on recovery specifics, asking what makes a difference: awareness, what we do, what we think, what we do with emotions and impulsive urges, taking charge of personal boundaries, clarifying values and identity, relating to ourselves and others, creating pleasure, dealing with flashbacks and crises, managing physical health, or relationships with something "larger than ourselves", ending with notes to family and friends and comments to the reader.

Journal article

The case of Joan

Author:
APPELBAUM Ann H.
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 6(1/2), 2008, pp.49-51.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

A short case study of a woman with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and polysubstance abuse is presented. It covers her behaviour and decision to accept help. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Transference-focused psychotherapy for BPD

Authors:
YEOMANS Frank, DELANEY Jill
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 6(1/2), 2008, pp.157-170.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Transference-focused psychotherapy is defined as a modified psychodynamic psychotherapy based on the object relations theory of personality and the psychodynamic principles of: the dynamic unconscious; the importance of transference and counter-transference; and the reliance upon interpretation of the transference as the dominant therapeutic intervention. This approach has been shown through a randomised clinical trial to be effective in reducing symptoms and improving reflective function in patients with borderline personality disorder. As well as reducing symptoms, it also has the longer term aim of identity integration through the interpretive elaboration of the split-off internalised representations of self and others that underlie the condition. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Understanding and caring for patients experiencing paranoia

Author:
WALSH Lynne
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 2.01.07, 2007, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

This article aims to provide nurses with an understanding of paranoia and how to help those individuals maintain a good quality of life. The article looks at the causes of paranoia, the different types of paranoid states, and nursing care and assessment.

Journal article

Personality disorder service provision: a review of the recent literature

Authors:
EVANS Sacha, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 22(2), 2017, pp.65-82.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution of the field of personality disorder since the publication of “Personality disorder: no longer a diagnosis of exclusion” in 2003. Design/methodology/approach: A review of both the academic literature contained within relevant databases alongside manual searches of policy literature and guidance from the key stakeholders was undertaken. Findings: The academic and policy literature concentrates on treating borderline and antisocial personality disorders. It seems unlikely that evidence will resolutely support any one treatment modality over another. Criticism has arisen that comparison between modalities misses inter and intra patient heterogeneity and the measurement of intervention has become conflated with overall service design and the need for robust care pathways. Apparent inconsistency in service availability remains, despite a wealth of evidence demonstrating the availability of cost-effective interventions and the significant inequality of social and health outcomes for this population. Research limitations/implications: The inclusion of heterogeneous sources required pragmatic compromises in methodological rigour. Originality/value: This paper charts the recent developments in the field with a wealth of wide-ranging evidence and robust guidance from institutions such as NICE. The policy literature has supported the findings of this evidence but current clinical practice and what patients and carers can expect from services remains at odds. This paper lays bare the disparity between what we know and what is being delivered. The authors argue for the need for greater research into current practice to inform the setting of minimum standards for the treatment of personality disorder. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Borderline personality features and emotion regulation deficits are associated with child physical abuse potential

Authors:
HIRAOKA Regina, et al
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 52, 2016, pp.177-184.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The present study extends prior research examining the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) features and child physical abuse (CPA) risk. It was hypothesised that: (1) high CPA risk parents (compared to low CPA risk parents) would more often report clinically elevated levels of BPD features; (2) high CPA risk parents with elevated BPD features would represent a particularly high-risk subgroup; and (3) the association between elevated BPD features and CPA risk would be partially explained by emotion regulation difficulties. General population parents (N = 106; 41.5% fathers) completed self-report measures of BPD features, CPA risk, and emotion regulation difficulties. Results support the prediction that BPD features are more prevalent among high (compared to low) CPA risk parents. Among the parents classified as high CPA risk (n = 45), one out of three (33.3%) had elevated BPD features. In contrast, none of the 61 low CPA risk parents reported elevated BPD symptoms. Moreover, 100% of the parents with elevated BPD features (n = 15) were classified as high-risk for CPA. As expected, high CPA risk parents with elevated BPD features (compared to high CPA risk parents with low BPD features) obtained significantly higher scores on several Child Abuse Potential Inventory scales, including the overall abuse scale (d = 1.03). As predicted, emotion regulation difficulties partially explained the association between BPD features and CPA risk. Findings from the present study suggest that a subset of high CPA risk parents in the general population possess clinically significant levels of BPD symptoms and these parents represent an especially high-risk subgroup. Interventions designed to address BPD symptoms, including emotion regulation difficulties, appear to be warranted in these cases. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Personality disorder and intellectual disability: concept and prevalence

Author:
ANDERSEN Hilde Katrine
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(4), 2015, pp.163-173.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The range of prevalence of personality disorder (PD) found in people with intellectual disability (ID) has been reported as vast, and has included data from dissimilar settings. The purpose of this paper is to review the reported prevalence of PD in the general population of people with ID, and to consider how different and changing ideas about PD have affected these rates. Design/methodology/approach: Cross-sectional studies of the prevalence of PD in people with ID were identified. The quality of the studies was considered, along with how cases of PD were identified. Findings: Six studies were included. The reported prevalence of PD in people known to have ID ranged from 0.7 to 35 per cent. Possible reasons for this wide range included different views of PD and methods of assessment. Research limitations/implications: The wide range of findings suggests that methodological differences are significant. Consideration to how clinicians should respond to the overlap of impairment between ID and PD may improve the conceptual clarity of PD, informing future epidemiological research. Originality/value: This review was limited to studies of samples likely to be representative of the general ID population. The range of prevalence estimates was narrower than previously reported, and more likely to reflect the true prevalence rate of PD amongst people who have ID. Consideration was also given to how different ideas of PD led to different methods and may have contributed to variance in the results. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Intellectual disability, personality disorder and offending: a systematic review

Authors:
RAYNER Kelly, et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(2), 2015, pp.50-61.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: This review seeks to systematically review studies where personality disorder has been explored as a descriptive or possible predictive factor in offending behaviour in people with an intellectual disability. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach A systematic search of several databases was conducted and 15 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Findings: Methodological limitations and problems in accurate diagnosis within this client group preclude firm conclusions being reached. Originality/value: It is concluded that further research should be conducted, with particular attention paid to the conceptualisation and assessment of personality disorder. (Publisher abstract)

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