Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mentally disordered offenders"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 639

Book

Offenders suffering from psychopathic disorder: Consultation document

Authors:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Security, GREAT BRITAIN. Home Office
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health and Social Security/Great Britain. Home Offi
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Mad, bad and dangerous to know: reflections of a forensic practitioner

Author:
PRINS Herschel
Publisher:
Waterside Press
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
155p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Hook

The author, who rose from a relatively modest background to become a leading authority on forensic work with mentally disordered offenders, charts the key events in a fifty year career. He traces his personal journey from 'main grade' probation officer, Home Office civil servant, trainer and inspector to top level positions at Leicester and Loughborough Universities, with the Parole Board, key nationwide committees, mental health inquiries and beyond. Having spent his professional life “working with the troubled and the troublesome, the unloved (and the often unlovely)”, a constant theme of his work has been to combine the practical with an awareness of what is possible when one works with mentally disordered offenders. Among the questions he attempts to answer are: Why choose that life and these clients? And what demands has that choice made on him, his family, his colleagues? The 'reflections' contain insights for practitioners and criminologists alike and the book is expected to be of inertest to criminal psychologists, psychiatrists, probation officers, social workers, judges, magistrates, and all students of crime and punishment.

Book

An unsuitable place for treatment: diverting mentally disordered offenders from custody

Author:
PENAL AFFAIRS CONSORTIUM
Publisher:
Penal Affairs Consortium
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
London

Short paper summarising the available research findings on diverting offenders with mental health problems from custody.

Journal article

Law reform - mentally disordered and vulnerable adults

Author:
DAILLY Mike
Journal article citation:
SCOLAG Journal, 205, October 1993, pp.153-154.
Publisher:
ScoLAG(Scottish Legal Action Group)

Outlines some key issues raised by the Scottish Law Commission's discussion paper on mentally disordered and vulnerable adults.

Book

The control of mental disorder through the law: some observations on current legislation

Author:
BEAN Philip
Publisher:
University of Western Australia. Department of Social Work and Social Administra
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
46p.
Place of publication:
Perth

Paper based on a series of seminars. Discusses contemporary issues in the light of proposals to change and update Australian legislation.

Journal article

Criminal justice diversion and liaison services: a path to success?

Author:
DYER Wendy
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 12(1), 2013, pp.31-45.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Diversion services for adult mentally disordered offenders are back in the limelight twenty years after their original development. This article argues there are a number of important lessons to be learnt. Services of this kind ‘process’ different people in different ways with different outcomes. Current developments therefore need to provide an holistic, patient-centred approach across the whole offender pathway, which meets the needs of different groups of people. What works for some might not work for others, but patterns can be mapped and good and bad pathways identified and used to inform good practice and service improvement. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘The other side of silence’: the role of the appropriate adult post-Bradley

Author:
CUMMINS Ian
Journal article citation:
Ethics and Social Welfare, 5(3), 2011, pp.306-312.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Abingdon

The legal system and penal policy in the United Kingdom and similar legal jurisdictions does not regard offenders with mental health problems as a distinct group. The range of mental health needs and the great differences in patterns of offending make it difficult to make generalisations in this field. In addition, there are a number of ethical and philosophical issues that arise here relating to the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. The publication of the Bradley review was a watershed in the development of policy regarding the way that the Criminal Justice System responds to individuals with mental health problems. It then goes on to explore one aspect of that response: the role of the Appropriate Adult under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984). This article is concerned with one area of the CJS: the interviewing of detained persons in police custody and the role of the Appropriate Adult.

Book Full text available online for free

Nobody made the connection: the prevalence of neurodisability in young people who offend

Authors:
HUGHES Nathan, et al
Publisher:
Office of the Children's Commissioner
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
London

Childhood neurodisability occurs when there is a compromise of the central or peripheral nervous system due to genetic, pre-birth or birth trauma, and/or injury or illness in childhood. This incorporates a wide range of specific neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions. This report presents a review of published evidence in relation to the following research questions: what is the prevalence of various neurodevelopmental disorders amongst young people within the youth justice system secure estate; and what are the key issues for policy and practice associated with these levels of prevalence? The review found that many young people currently in secure settings in England have undiagnosed neurodevelopmental conditions which have directly contributed to their offending behaviour. The report has several key audiences, from national government departments and bodies, to local strategic partnerships and agency leads, to practitioners working with young people with potential neurodevelopmental difficulties.

Journal article

Does transinstitutionalization explain the overrepresentation of people with serious mental illness in the criminal justice system?

Author:
PRINS Seth J.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 47(6), December 2011, pp.716-722.
Publisher:
Springer

Some believe that the overrepresentation of people with serious mental illness in prisons is linked to policies of deinstitutationazation and the closure of many psychiatric hospitals. This phenomenon has been described as transinstitutionalization. After debating the issue, this article concludes that increasing access to psychiatric hospital beds would not reduce the number of people with serious mental illness in prisons, and that community-based treatment is needed to improve both their mental health and criminal justice outcomes.

Journal article

An evaluation of the impact of a social inclusion programme on occupational functioning for forensic service users

Author:
FITZGERALD Martin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 74(10), October 2011, pp.465-472.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Forensic occupational therapy has been described as a new specialism in forensic care and, the author suggests, has the potential to fulfil the social inclusion expectations of UK government policy regarding the rehabilitation process. However there is little information as yet to direct work with forensic service users with serious mental illness. This study was designed to provide evidence for, and to guide, the practice of forensic occupational therapists working in a rehabilitation setting. It compared Model of Human Occupation Screening Tool (MOHOST) scores of forensic service users who received treatment as usual and participated in a social inclusion programme (n = 24) with the scores of those who received treatment as usual (n = 19) only. The programme involved graded community engagement and one-one goal planning and was delivered at four long-stay, low-secure rehabilitation units in the north west of England. There was no difference in MOHOST scores between the two groups before intervention but a significant difference in scores was found in the intervention group post-intervention. This difference is believed to represent change in occupational functioning and evidence of successful treatment outcomes. The author concludes that forensic service users could benefit from occupational therapy programmes that include activities to promote social inclusion.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts