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Journal article

Learning disability nursing

Author:
MITCHELL Duncan
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 32(3), September 2004, pp.115-118.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Learning disability nursing has had an interesting history over recent decades. Despite many predictions of it being replaced it has survived to engage in a variety of roles in contemporary learning disability services. Acknowledges the profession's anomalous position and discusses its current position within nursing and within learning disability services.

Journal article

Identifying the foci of interest to nurses in Irish intellectual disability services

Author:
SHEERIN Fintan
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities, 8(2), June 2004, pp.159-174.
Publisher:
Sage

Intellectual disability nursing in Ireland is at a crucial juncture, with various forces seeking to relegate it to a postgraduate specialist subject. The specific input of intellectual disability nursing to the broader profession may be lost, and may be subsumed within an illness model unrepresentative of the reality of care. Explores this specific input and to identifies foci for nursing intervention within residential intellectual disability care. This was achieved through a Delphi study; three focus groups held among Irish intellectual disability nurses working in three service settings; and personal interviews held with residential service/nurse managers.

Journal article

An investigation into the public health roles of community learning disability nurses

Authors:
MAFUBA Kay, GATES Bob
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(1), 2015, pp.1-7.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

International studies have shown poor uptake of public health initiatives by people with learning disabilities. In addition, studies have shown that people with learning disabilities experience poor access to public health services. The contribution of community learning disability nurses in meeting the public health needs of people with learning disabilities has evolved differently across the UK resulting in conflicting understanding of this role. This paper reports on a study that explored and explained the contribution of community learning disability nurses in the implementation of public health policies for people with learning disabilities in the UK. The study demonstrates that community learning disability nurses are involved in health surveillance, health promotion, health facilitation, health prevention and protection, health education, and healthcare delivery. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Intellectual disability nursing – responding to health inequity

Author:
SHEERIN Fintan K.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 40(4), December 2012, pp.266-271.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

People with learning disabilities often have poorer health outcomes than the general population. It is recognised that improvements in health outcomes for people with learning disabilities is central to the role of learning disability nurses. This article argues that the continued enactment of the current role of learning disability nurses will fail to achieve improved outcomes and will prolong the marginalisation of people with learning disabilities. In identifying the basis of such outcomes to be social inequity, it proposes that nursing must act in two orientations: health-oriented service provision and social activism. It is argued that only when such an approach is adopted will there be a real opportunity for people with learning disabilities to achieve optimal health outcomes.

Journal article

A helping hand

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, December 2012, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Inequalities in the standard of healthcare for people with learning disabilities (LD) has been an issue in hospitals for some time, but hospitals in West Sussex are addressing this with recent developments. For example, a computer-based tracking system enables patients with LD to receive specialist support based on their care needs – when a person with LD arrives at the hospital, they are immediately flagged on the system to alert a team of specialist nurses. Additionally, a six page ‘passport’ provides essential information about the person with LD, usually completed by the patient’s carer, and advises hospital staff on all matters regarding the persons health.

Journal article

Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service

Authors:
GLOVER Gyles, EMERSON Eric
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 17(4), 2012, pp.194-198.
Publisher:
Emerald

Learning disability nurses work in many different settings including community teams, inpatient services, criminal justice, and education. A better understanding of the numbers of learning disability nurses working in different sectors is essential to workforce planning and training plans. The aim of this paper is to report on trends in the number of learning disability nurses working in the English NHS. A secondary analysis of data from NHS workforce statistics was conducted. The findings showed that, over the period 2008 to 2011, there was a decline of 23% in the number of whole time equivalent learning disability nurses employed by the NHS. While the decline may, in part, be explained by a parallel reduction in NHS inpatient beds for people with learning disabilities, unevenly distributed reductions in the number of community nurses in different English regions are harder to explain.

Journal article

Intellectual disability nursing in Ireland: identifying its development and future

Authors:
DOODY Owen, SLEVIN Eamonn, TAGGART Lawrence
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 16(1), March 2012, pp.7-16.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Intellectual disability nursing is one of the smallest branches of nursing in Ireland. As the discipline of intellectual disability nursing is unique to Ireland and the United Kingdom, there is a responsibility on intellectual disability nurses to identify their unique identity and their responses to the demands of changing services. Since its inception as an individual nursing profession in 1959 in Ireland, both education and service provision philosophies have changed over time. These changes have been in response to national and international reports and changing attitudes. The history of the care of persons with an intellectual disability in Ireland was originally one of institutional care and segregation from the community, but in the 1980s a social model of care began to be implemented. Intellectual disability nurse education in Ireland is currently a 4-year undergraduate course. Over the years, the discipline has been subject to much debate, relating to the nature of intellectual disability nursing and the knowledge, skills and role of nurses working in this area. This article traces the development of intellectual disability nursing in Ireland, identifying its educational development, service changes and future position.

Book Full text available online for free

Networking in intellectual disability nursing: an international perspective

Authors:
HORAN Paul, BROWN Michael
Publisher:
National Networks of Learning Disabilities Nursing
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

The key findings of a five country study that explored the networking activities of nurses working in health and social contexts with people with learning disabilities are presented. Some of the main literature on the topic is presented, the methodology used outlined and the findings illustrated. Key implications for the future development of Networks are highlighted. The report illustrates what can be achieved through networks and networking.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Job swap

Author:
BURGER Helen
Journal article citation:
Viewpoint, January 2009, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Mencap/Gateway

The North Staffordshire Palliative Care Project aims to provide support and advice on palliative care to people with a learning disability and their families and carers. This article reports on an innovative project, where learning disability and palliative care nurses are sharing expertise.

Journal article

Health for all?

Authors:
BLAIR Jim, et al
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, September 2008, pp.24-26.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors explain the importance of learning disability nurses and their role in multidisciplinary teams.

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