Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities services"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 237

Book Full text available online for free

Statistics release: adults with learning disabilities implementation of 'The same as you?' Scotland 2005

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive National Statistics
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The purpose of this Statistics Release is to present the third set of national figures for services provided by local authorities in Scotland for adults with learning disabilities. All figures for 2005 relate to the week ending 18 September 2005 and are provisional. As such, they may be subject to change. The final figures will be published in future publications. This publication is a result of The same as you? review of services for people with learning disabilities, published in May 2000. Its 29 recommendations for developing learning disability services set out a programme for change over 10 years.

Journal article

A reflection on PostModernism and the transformation of failure in learning disability services within the independent public sector at the beginning of the 21st Century

Author:
DAY Steve
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(1), March 2007, pp.38-42.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The author discusses the transformation of learning disability services in light of the postmodern world. He places the transformation of services for people with learning disability, within the context of a global market place. He argues that change in the construction and administration of both the National Health Service and Social Services has, and is, having a profound effect on the lives of people with learning disabilities. Those changes have come about, in part, due to a recognition of past failures. The author has worked in Learning Disability Services for 19 years, and has seen in that time British society slowly begin to recognize people with learning disabilities amongst its population. There is a creaking door opening for people with learning disabilities, providing them recognition within the PostModern construct of fragmented societies. It is argued that against such a backdrop there is a real chance of the failure to meet the needs of people with learning disabilities becoming transformed.

Book Full text available online for free

Having your say? The same as you? National Implementation Group: report of the Advocacy Sub Group

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
68p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

A National Implementation Group was set up in 2001 to assist with the implementation of The same as you?. The Scottish Executive believed that the involvement of people with learning disabilities and family carers in implementing the findings of the review was just as important as it had been in carrying out the review. Members include 5 people with learning disabilities and 2 family carers. The group identified a number of priority areas that would be the main drivers for delivering the change programme. Advocacy was one of these. When The same as you? was published it said not enough people were getting advocacy. A short life working group was set up to look at progress with the development of advocacy for people with learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders in Scotland. This is the report of that group.

Book Full text available online for free

Make my day! The same as you? National Implementation Group: report of the Day Services Sub Group

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
102p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The same as you? review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000. It set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s Syndrome) to lead full lives, giving them choice about where they live and what they do. People with learning disabilities and family carers were involved at all stages of the review and their experience of life with learning disabilities shaped the vision for the future. Day services have played an important role for people with learning disabilities and their family carers. The same as you? (SAY) recognises the importance of these services but also recognises that people were not getting opportunities to express what they wanted to do, many spent years attending a day centre without ever being formally assessed. This is the report of the sub group set up to look at day care services.

Journal article

More than pictures: developing an accessible resource

Authors:
CAMERON Lois, MATTHEWS Rhona
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 22(2), 2017, pp.57-65.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of developing an accessible communication resource which enables people with a learning disability to reflect on their lives and raise issues of concern. Design/methodology/approach: The process of making the resource and the facets that contribute to making it accessible are explored, e.g. design specification, the relationship between pictures and meaning, the order in which concepts are presented. The paper goes on to describe how the resource is put into practice using the format of a “Talking Mat”.® Talking Mats is a communication framework which has a strong evidence base that shows it improves the quality and quantity of information a person with a learning disability gives in a conversation. It provides practitioners with a consistent framework to support implementation. The impact of using the resource is explored through feedback from practitioners trained to use it and the stories that resulted. Findings: A well-constructed resource can support people with a learning disability to express their views on what matters to them at a specific time and raise concerns they may have. The individual views that have emerged from people are varied. This resource enabled them to be genuinely included in planning the steps required to bring about positive change in their lives. Originality/value: There is much emphasis on the development of accessible resources in the field of learning disability but little on the actual development process and the context of how resources are introduced. This paper aims to contribute to this knowledge base. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Developing a values evidence-based clinical supervision model within a forensic intellectual disability service

Author:
JACKSON William
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 5(1), 2014, pp.14-23.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development and proposal of a values evidence-based model of clinical supervision (CS) for the implementation by nursing staff (registered and non-registered nurses) within a forensic intellectual disability service. Design/methodology/approach: This is a conceptual and technical paper providing a descriptive account for a service provision with nursing staff. Findings: The paper does not present any research findings but does demonstrate a novel and innovative approach to the conceptualisation and implementation of CS. Originality/value: The paper examines the dominant concepts that shape existing thinking around CS and suggests a new interpretation that involves greater pragmatism through a values evidence-based approach. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Inclusion or outcomes? Tensions in the involvement of people with learning disabilities in strategic planning

Authors:
FYSON Rachel, FOX Liz
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 29(2), 2014, pp.239-254.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Social inclusion is a key principle that underpins the provision of services for people with learning disabilities in England. Learning Disability Partnership Boards, which are responsible for local strategic planning of learning disability services, hold a particular role in promoting inclusion since they are required both to operate inclusively and to achieve inclusive outcomes. This study sought to explore the extent to which these ambitions for inclusion were being achieved. It consisted of three phases: a scoping exercise to elicit the views of key stakeholders; a postal survey of Partnership Boards (response rate 51%); and semi-structured interviews with Partnership Boards members in six local authorities. Findings suggest that Partnership Boards are struggling to fulfil their dual role, with tensions emerging between the desire to operate in fully inclusive ways and the ability to affect strategic change within local services. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning disabilities: good practice project

Authors:
HOUGH Jo, MARTIN Kerry
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
57
Place of publication:
London

This report gives people who commission, design and deliver services a better understanding of how to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities. It is partly based on these good practice indicators: co-production; a capabilities approach to disability; community capacity building; a move towards more integrated services; and a commitment to personalisation. It presents six examples of good practice: Public Health Norfolk & Equal Lives (formerly Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People) and its provision of easy-to-access information on local health services; the Quality Checking project in Gloucestershire; London Borough of Hackney and Advance Support and supported living for people with complex needs; MacIntyre Care in Oxfordshire, representative of transition support for young people with complex needs; the Open University’s Social History of Learning Disability Group on sharing life stories; and Merseycare NHS Rebuild Service, which offers support for people with Down’s Syndrome and early onset dementia. It gives briefer details for other shortlisted projects. The report also includes an EasyRead summary. The project was completed under an action from ‘Transforming Care: A national response to Winterbourne View Hospital’. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Driving up quality code: driving up quality in learning disability services

Author:
DRIVING UP QUALITY ALLIANCE
Publisher:
Driving Up Quality Alliance
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
Liverpool

The Driving Up Quality Code for Learning Disability Services has been developed in response to the Winterbourne View programme of action. Although voluntary, the Code's aim is to avoid what happened at Winterbourne View ever happening again. Providers will be asked by umbrella organisations to sign up publicly to the Code. and offer evidence on how they meet, or are working towards meeting the Code. Likewise, commissioners will be also asked to sign up to the Code and commit to actively using the Code through their commissioning processes to improve quality in learning disability services. The Code explains its five main statements which are that: support is focussed o the person; the person is supported to have an ordinary and meaningful life; care and support focuses on people being happy and having a good quality of life; a good culture is important to the organisation; and managers and board members lead and run the organisation well. The Driving Up Quality Code has been developed by members of the Driving Up Quality Alliance: Housing and Support Alliance, English Community Care Association, Voluntary Organisations Disability Group, Sitra, Association for Real Change, National Care Association, National Care Forum, Adults with Learning Disability Services Forum, Shared Lives Plus and the Independent Healthcare Advisory Services. The Code is supported by the Care Quality Commission, the Department of Health, the Association of Directors of Adults Social Services, the Challenging Behaviour Foundation and NHS England. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Developing behavioural training services to meet defined standards within an Australian statewide disability service system and the associated client outcomes

Authors:
CRATES Nicola, SPICER Matthew
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(3), September 2012, pp.196-208.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

A previous paper (LaVigna, Christian, and Willis (2005)) reported on a project where Institute for Applied Behaviour Analysis staff trained a professional team in New Zealand to provide behavioural services that met defined criteria. The New Zealand team was then trained to train other practitioners to meet the same professional standards. However, no client outcomes were reported in that study. This study replicates the New Zealand study within disability services in Tasmania, Australia. This study also examined the associated client outcomes and the impact of the training on severity ratings of subsequent referrals. Three Tasmanian trainers trained participants to provide behavioural services that met the same professional standards. Client behavioural outcome data showed significant improvement. Referral data showed decreases in severity ratings. The authors concluded that the trainer of trainers process was effective in training staff to meet defined professional standards, including desired client outcomes.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts