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Book Full text available online for free

Get going together: an induction tool for health and social care integrated services

Authors:
SCOTTISH SOCIAL SERVICES COUNCIL, NHS EDUCATION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
NHS Education for Scotland
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
41p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Health Boards and Local Authorities recognise that to improve the joint working performance of the professionals within the services there is a requirement to develop structures to support joint working including joint training. This tool intends to augment joint training activities, by developing opportunities for a shared learning within integrated services. This process would begin within the induction period for all new staff to an organisation including support staff and professionally qualified staff. This tool recognises that induction is the foundation to the development of individuals and the organisation. All organisations have induction processes that support new employees. This tool maps a process that allows induction of staff to integrated services and should be conducted to allow this experience to be carried out together with interagency colleagues, enabling shared learning and experience, and supporting joint working in the near future. The key outcome of this simple tool is to prepare the employee to provide the best quality of service within an integrated service. The tool would support this by allowing the employee to work through a number of activities and exercises assisting their adjustment and early development in their new place of employment.

Journal article

Wise up on...integrated services

Author:
de CASTELLA Tom
Journal article citation:
Youth Work Now, December 2007, p.24.
Publisher:
Haymarket Professional Publications Ltd.
Place of publication:
London

The 'Youth Matters' green paper called for every local authority in England to have integrated youth support service in place before the end of 2008. This article explores what this means in practice and how it affects the delivery of youth work on the ground.

Journal article

Making connections: effective development of the intermediate tier

Authors:
HERBERT Gill, LAKE Geoff
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 13(1), February 2005, pp.35-42.
Publisher:
Emerald

Distils messages from an extensive period of consultancy involving 25 primary care trusts and their local authority and acute and mental health services partners. Emphasis was on sharing experience of implementing national policies and learning together, which facilitated co-evolution within whole systems.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

What does integrated working mean to you?

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
7 mins
Place of publication:
London

A short video which shows what 'integration' means to different people - professionals and people who use services. Health and social care often work together with a shared purpose, to improve the lives of people who use services, and their carers through the provision of person-centred, coordinated care. The film looks at five areas of integration: research, policy, organisational issues, the effect on staff, service users and carers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Integrated working: what does integrated working mean to you

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2013
Place of publication:
London

A short video which shows what 'integration' means to different people - professionals and people who use services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Integrated care in practice – the South Eastern Sydney experience

Authors:
STEWART Gregory, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 25(1), 2017, pp.49-60.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the recent efforts of a large publicly funded healthcare organisation in Sydney, Australia to implement integrated care (IC) “at scale and pace” in the messy, real-world context of a District Health Service. Design/methodology/approach: The paper outlines the theoretical and practical considerations used to design and develop a localised IC Strategy informed by the “House of Care” model (NHS England, 2016). Findings: The need for cross-agency partnership, a shared narrative, joint leadership and an IC Strategy underpinned by proven theoretical models model is described. Originality/value: This paper highlights key factors relating to implementation and evaluation of a local IC Strategy in the real world. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Moving from the margins: the challenges of building integrated local services

Authors:
ANDERSON Hannah, et al
Publishers:
Turning Point, Collaborate
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
15
Place of publication:
London

Discussion paper jointly produced by Collaborate and Turning Point, which presents seven key insights for building integrated public services. It argues local integrated services should be at the heart of strategies for social renewal and public service reform. The paper draws on the findings of a roundtable of experts which looked at why integrated services remain on the edge of public services. It highlights the behavioural, cultural and systemic challenges to greater integration. The paper also provides examples of different integrated services models, including Turning Point’s Connected Care model, the MEAM Approach developed by Making Every Adult Matter, and the West London Zone for Children and Young People. These three different approaches all demonstrate aspects of the seven insights, which is evidenced throughout the paper. The paper can be used to inform the commissioning, design and delivery of integrated services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Working in teams

Authors:
JELPHS Kim, DICKINSON Helen, MILLER Robin
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
144
Place of publication:
Bristol
Edition:
2nd ed.

This revised edition brings together cutting-edge thinking about team working, and considers how this can be turned into practice within the context of interagency settings. Working in teams sounds simple but the reality is often more difficult within complex health and social care systems. The book introduces a range of theories, models and research to demonstrate the benefits – and pitfalls – inherent in team working in collaborative settings. Through real-life examples the guide focuses on how inter-agency teams may be made to function more effectively. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social network analysis and social work inquiry

Authors:
GILLIEATT Sue, et al
Journal article citation:
Australian Social Work, 68(3), 2015, pp.338-351.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Understanding and positively impacting social networks is core to social work practice and research. As a research method, social network analysis (SNA) provides an important mechanism for mapping various types of networks as well as the relationships and exchanges between network actors. This research reviews how SNA have been applied to social work inquiry, and describes how SNA was used together with qualitative methods to a consortium of mental health and related services in Australia to explore the complexity of service integration. In the study 19 people were interviewed. SNA was then used to examine indicators of service integration such as the frequency, type, and direction of information exchanges including referral pathways (to and from). Graphical representations of both information exchange and referral pathways for managers and service providers were produced. When combined with other research methods and information, social network analysis is shown to be a useful tool providing both visual and sociometric evidence of relational activities, thus creating a strong basis for advocacy and social change. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Japan's vision of a 'total care' future looks bright

Author:
HAYASHI Mayumi
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 124(6404), 27 June 2014, pp.25-27.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Describes the Japanese government's ambitious "2025 vision" for the delivery of health care for its ageing population through the establishment of a localised 'comprehensive "total care" provision. (Edited publisher abstract)

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