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Digital Media Full text available online for free

Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - CPD accredited online course

Publisher:
NOFAS-UK
Place of publication:
London

An estimated 6,000 to 7,000 babies are born in Britain each year with alcohol related brain damage known as Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). FASD - The Course aims to provide information about Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. FASD - The Course can be taken at the learners own pace. It has been designed for health, mental health, social service providers, educators and any professionals in the UK working with children, adolescents and adults affected by FASD. Parents, caregivers and family members may also find the course useful. The course provides an overview of FASD history, risk factors for Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, signs, symptoms, prevention and suggested treatment. Permission to adapt this course for the UK has been granted by the US Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Journal article Full text available online for free

One drink too many?

Author:
MCCARTHY Bridget
Journal article citation:
Social Work Now: the Practice Journal of Child, Youth and Family, 29, December 2004, pp.4-9.
Publisher:
Child, Youth and Family (Department of Child, Youth and Family Services, Te Tari Awhina I te Tamaiti, te Rangatahi, tae atu ki te Whanau)

Discusses foetal alcohol disorders and their implications for the social services.

Journal article

"How could I have done this?" Thoughts of mothers of children with fetal alcohol syndrome

Authors:
ZABOTKA Joelle, BRADLEY Carolyn, ESCUETA MaryTherese
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 17(3), 2017, pp.258-274.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Biological mothers of children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) must cope with the struggles of parenting a child with special needs with the knowledge that their children’s problems are due to their alcohol use during pregnancy. Qualitative interviews were conducted by telephone with 11 biological mothers of children with FAS. This group of mothers understood their use of alcohol during pregnancy through reliance on the disease model, inaccurate or incomplete knowledge of the consequences of drinking during pregnancy, the advice of others, and a lack of awareness of the pregnancy. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Initial report of the inquiry into the current picture of FASD in the UK today

Author:
ALL PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON FASD
Publishers:
All Parliamentary Group on FASD, FASD Trust
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
22
Place of publication:
London

Report of an inquiry into Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in the UK. The report draws on written and oral evidence from parents and carers of children with FASD, organisations and professionals, including a private session with a group of parents, carers, and two people affected by FASD. Themes from the evidence are discussed in the following areas: pregnancy and alcohol, medical perspective, the impact on parents, carers and people with FASD; children in care or adopted who are affected by FASD; education; economic impact; the alcohol industry; and how the UK compares with other countries in terms of raising awareness and providing support. The report concludes that the UK is behind similarly-developed countries in implementing prevention guidelines and services to support people affected by FASD. The Inquiry also found that whilst more children are being diagnosed with FASD, there is still a major gap in appropriate support and advice post-diagnosis. Recommendations include: ensuring that comprehensive training is provided to social workers and other staff so they are fully aware of the issue of FASD; that adoption preparation clearly identifies the likelihood of adopting a child with FASD, what FASD is and how to adapt parenting strategies accordingly; and that post-adoption support is tailored to meet the needs of children with FASD and their parents. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Canadian children and youth in care: the cost of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Care Forum, 43(1), 2014, pp.83-96.
Publisher:
Springer

Background: A high prevalence of prenatal alcohol exposure has been reported among children in care and thus, the risk of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) in this population is high. Objective: The purpose of the current study was to estimate the number of children (0–18 years) in care with FASD and to determine the associated cost by age group, gender, and province/territory in Canada in 2011. Methods: The prevalence of children in care by province/territory was obtained from the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal, and the number of children in care with FASD for each province/territory was estimated from available epidemiological studies. In order to calculate the total cost per province/territory, the cost per individual per day, by age group, was applied to the respective number of children in care with FASD. Results: The estimated number of children in care with FASD ranged from 2,225 to 7,620, with an annual cost of care ranging from 57.9to198.3 million Canadian dollars (CND). The highest overall cost (29.5to101.1 million CND) was for 11–15 year-olds. Conclusion: The study findings can be used to demonstrate the substantial economic burden that FASD places on the child welfare system. Attention towards the needs of this population and prevention efforts to reduce FASD incidence in Canada, and other countries are urgently needed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The impact of raising a child with FASD upon carers: findings from a mixed methodology study in the UK

Authors:
MUKHERJEE Raja A. S., WRAY Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Adoption and Fostering, 37(1), 2013, pp.43-56.
Publisher:
British Association for Adoption and Fostering

Research suggests that caring for a child with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) creates unique challenges for carers. To investigate this, three focus groups and education sessions, attended by 66 people, were held in the UK. Knowledge about FASD and its impact on families was evaluated using the focus groups, the Parental Stress Index and knowledge questionnaire. Eight broad themes were identified from thematic analysis of the focus groups. The findings suggest more support is needed for carers of children with FASD, especially as carers grow older. The implication for current practice should be further evaluated in this group (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Autism spectrum disorder and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Part I: a comparison of parenting stress

Authors:
WATSON Shelley L., COONS Kelly D., HAYES Stephanie A.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 38(2), 2013, pp.95-104.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

To compare the stress of parents of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) 25 parents of children with ASD and 25 parents of children with FASD completed the Parenting Stress Index – Short Form (PSI-SF) and the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress – Friedrich's Version (QRS-F). Although both parent groups reported elevated stress, PSI-SF results indicated that parents of children with FASD were experiencing significantly more stress compared to parents of children with ASD. No significant differences were found between groups on the total QRS-F, but parents of children with FASD had higher scores on the Pessimism subscale. The authors call for measures grounded in theory as well as mixed methods research that includes the subjective experience of parents’ stress. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: not just another pretty face

Authors:
RILEY Edward P., et al
Journal article citation:
Seen and Heard, 21(4), December 2011, pp.32-50.
Publisher:
NAGALRO
Place of publication:
Esher

This article presents an in-depth analysis of the effect of alcohol as a substance capable of interfering with the development of a foetus, interfering with normal brain development during pregnancy, resulting in birth defects leading to a diagnosis of Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) or Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). It analyses the teratogenic effects of alcohol on the brain and behaviour, including brain size, intellectual ability, language and regional brain abnormalities. It also analyses secondary disabilities, including mental health issues and social functioning. In ending, the article argues for the identification of high-risk individuals prior to pregnancy as a preventative measure.

Book Full text available online for free

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder: case studies

Author:
WORCESTERSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL. Early Years and Childcare Service
Publisher:
Worcestershire County Council. Early Years and Childcare Service
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
3p.
Place of publication:
Worcester

Two case studies are presented to highlight the condition of Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The first case study is from a practitioner perspective and describes the practitioners experience of working with a child with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in an early years setting. The second case study provides a family perspective and the parents experience of bringing up their son and the professionals that have been involved in his life. The document is one of the resources to come from the Building Bridges with Understanding project.

Journal article

Caregiver perceptions of the community integration of adults with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in British Columbia

Authors:
CLARK Erica, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 21(5), September 2008, pp.446-456.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Adults with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) require support to be part of the community; however, most have few supports other than family and friends. The purpose of this study was to assess caregiver perceptions of community integration of adults with FASD living in British Columbia. The Assimilation, Integration, Marginalization and Segregation (AIMS) Interview and Functional Assessment were used to assess community integration and the level of support needed respectively. Scores on the AIMS indicated that most of the adults with FASD were integrated (i.e. disability related needs were identified and supported) in the following domains: medical, dental and housing; however, a large percentage were marginalized in other domains. Living with a caregiver had the greatest positive impact on integration while a history of incarceration or confinement had a negative impact. Although most of the adults with FASD had achieved community integration in some areas; this was, to some extent, because of the support of family and friends.

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