Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"falls"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 301

Book

A review of research on falls among elderly people

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Trade and Industry,|Age Concern
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
86p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Lighting and falls on stairs in the homes of older people with sight loss

Authors:
SHAHEEN Aliah, et al
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
London

The research explored the effects of varying lighting conditions on the movement of older people with sight loss as they climb up and down stairs, and in particular the clearance, or distance between their feet and the steps. Twelve participants (eight males and four females) with an average age of 77 years took part in the study. The results of this study showed that there were no statistically significant differences in clearance measures under the different lighting conditions used in the study. This means that the better lighting conditions did not affect the participants’ risk of falling. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Falls in older people with sight loss: a review of emerging research and key action points

Author:
THOMAS POCKLINGTON TRUST
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

Draws on recent research to summarise what is known about falls and falls prevention amongst older people with sight loss. It explores the implications of research findings for action to address and reduce the risk of falls among older people with sight loss and suggests key issues for health and social care professionals to consider when working with older people, many of whom may have sight loss, and for sight loss specialists to consider when addressing individuals’ risks of falls. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Patient safety culture and the association with safe resident care in nursing homes

Authors:
THOMAS Kali S., et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 52(6), December 2012, pp.802-811.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

... and residents who fell. Physical restraint use was related to falls after controlling for structural characteristics and PSC. In practical terms the findings translate into a 10% increase in the PSC score in an average 110 bed facility having 3-4 fewer residents who are physically restrained. It is suggested that staff in these NHs may be more aware of the alternatives to physical restraint and may

Journal article

How are the costs of care for medical falls distributed? The costs of medical falls by component of cost, timing, and injury severity

Authors:
BOHL Alex A., et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 52(5), October 2012, pp.664-675.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Health care costs are known to increase in the year following a fall. This study examined the components of cost that drive this increase over time, stratified by injury severity. Data were drawn from cost and utilisation information (2004-2007) for persons enrolled in an integrated care delivery system in Seattle. The study used a longitudinal cohort design, with each individual providing 2–3 years data. A total of 8,969 medical fallers were identified using ICD codes and 8,956 nonfaller controls were included matched by age and gender. Total costs were partitioned into 7 components: inpatient, outpatient, emergency, radiology, pharmacy, postacute care, and “other.” It appears that the large increase in costs after a hospitalised fall is mainly associated with inpatient and postacute care. The spike in costs after a nonhospitalised fall is attributable to outpatient and “other” (e.g., ambulatory surgery or community health services) components. Hospitalised fallers’ inpatient, emergency, postacute care, outpatient, and radiology costs were not always greater than those for nonhospitalised fallers. It is concluded that the components associated with increased costs after a medical fall vary over time and by injury severity. The authors suggest that future studies should examine whether delivering certain acute and postacute health services after a fall improve health and reduce cost trajectories more than others.

Journal article

Fall detectors: a review of the literature

Authors:
WARD Gillian, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 6(3), 2012, pp.202-215.
Publisher:
Emerald

This review explored the recent literature regarding the development of fall detector technology. The review was part of a service evaluation on the use of fall detectors across the region funded by NHS West Midlands. The authors also discuss the application and use of products designed to detect falls and alert help from end-user and health and social care staff perspectives. The literature of robust evidence regarding different approaches to technology in the management and detection of falls. Users had mixed views regarding the use of fall detectors, with some people having concerns about privacy, lack of human contact, user-friendliness and appropriate training, whilst others clearly identified the benefits of detecting falls and raising an alert. The implications of these findings

Journal article

Depression: a modifiable factor in fearful older fallers transitioning to frailty?

Authors:
MHAOLÁIN Aine M. Ni, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(7), July 2012, pp.727-733.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

It is suggested that fear of falling, one of the most common fears among community-dwelling older people, is as serious a health problem as the falls themselves. It often leads to activity avoidance. The authors believe that understanding fear of falling may help to identify strategies to reduce concern in the vulnerable old. This cross sectional study evaluated the psychological factors associated with fear of falling in a group of fallers transitioning to frailty compared with robust or non-frail fallers. A total of 301 fallers (mean age 75 years) underwent assessment. Fear of falling was measured using the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale, and frailty using the Biological Syndrome Model. Psychological assessment included anxiety, depression, loneliness, personality factors and cognition.

Journal article

There's no apprenticeship for Alzheimer's: the caring relationship when an older person experiencing dementia falls

Authors:
MCINTYRE Anne, REYNOLDS Frances
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 32(5), July 2012, pp.873-896.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Older people experiencing dementia are twice as likely to fall, resulting in serious injury, reduction in everyday activity and admission to long-term care. Carer burden also increases when a care-recipient falls. This study investigated the experiences of falling of community-living older people with dementia and their carers. Participants included 9 older people with Alzheimer's disease and their ten carers, recruited from a large mental health National Health Service trust. The antecedents, falls events and consequences of falls were discussed. Findings revealed three themes: ‘learning as you go’, ‘we're always together’, ‘nobody was interested’. The findings demonstrated how falling accentuates the impact of dementia on the dyad. Spouse-carers' discussion of their own falls highlighted

Journal article

The ABC scale and fall risk: a systematic review

Authors:
STASNY Bernadette Marie, et al
Journal article citation:
Physical and Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics, 29(3), September 2011, pp.233-242.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

This systematic review focuses on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale in order to assess how well it predicts falls in older adults living in the community. The evidence is from only three studies, all of which were judged to be good quality. The results suggest that the ABC scale is a useful measure of balance confidence in older adults, but research on its ability to predict falls is limited. Large, longer-term, prospective studies are needed.

Journal article

Falls after discharge from hospital: is there a gap between older peoples’ knowledge about falls prevention strategies and the research evidence?

Authors:
HILL Anne-Marie, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 51(5), October 2011, pp.653-662.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

This study explored whether older people were prepared to engage in appropriate falls prevention strategies after discharge from hospital in Swan Districts hospital, Perth, Australia. Three hundred and thirty three older patients about to be discharged from hospital were surveyed about their knowledge regarding falls prevention strategies. Participants were asked to suggest strategies to reduce their falls risk at home after discharge, and their responses were compared with reported research evidence for falls prevention interventions. Strategies were classified into 7 categories: behavioural; support while mobilising; approach to movement; physical environment; visual; medical; and activities or exercise. Although exercise has been identified as an effective falls risk reduction strategy, only about 3% of participants suggested engaging in exercises. Falls prevention was most often conceptualised by participants as requiring one or two strategies for avoiding an accidental event, rather than engaging in sustained multiple risk reduction behaviours. Overall, patients had low levels of knowledge about appropriate falls prevention strategies. The authors concluded that health care workers should design and deliver falls prevention education programmes specifically targeted to older people discharged from hospital.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts