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BookDigital Media

Epilepsy and learning disabilities: a video training pack to aid teaching on epilepsy and its management

Authors:
CODLING Mary, et al
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
43p., 2 videocassettes
Place of publication:
Brighton
Book

Brain injury and epilepsy

Author:
RICKARDS Hugh
Publisher:
Headway
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
29p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham
Edition:
2nd

Injury to the brain in the form of a scar increases the risk of an epileptic attack. This is more likely to happen in a penetrating injury, where the skull has been fractured and the brain pierced by the skull or some other foreign object. Although the wound heals, the resulting scar causes the electrical activity in that area to be unstable and liable to bursts of uncontrollable activity. Seizures brought on by a head injury often occur within the first week after the injury, but the first may not appear until one or two years have passed. A person is not considered free of seizures until 2 or 3 seizure-free years have passed. In the UK it is usual for a person to surrender their driving licence until a time when a doctor decides the person is seizure-free.

Book

Report of the working group on services for people with epilepsy: a report to the Department of Health and Social Security, the Department of Education and Science and the Welsh Office

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Security
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
77p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

The child with epilepsy

Author:
DINNAGE Rosemary
Publisher:
NFER-Nelson
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
68p.
Place of publication:
Windsor
Journal article

Service responses to people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy: a systematic review

Authors:
ROBERTSON Janet, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 30(1), 2017, pp.1-32.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Epilepsy is highly prevalent in people with intellectual disabilities and is associated with increased mortality and high healthcare usage. This systematic review summarises research on service responses to people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy. Method: Studies published from 1990 were identified via electronic searches using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO and Web of Science, regarding epilepsy for staff, carers and people with intellectual disabilities were highlighted. Conclusion: There are no methodologically robust studies on service-related interventions for people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy. Further research on improving service delivery is required to substantiate findings reported here. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Reaching out to carers innovation fund 2010/11: Department of Health: final report

Author:
GARDINER Bridget
Publisher:
Epilepsy Society
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
3p.
Place of publication:
Chalfont St. Peter

The final report of work undertaken by the Epilepsy Society, which was funded by the Department of Health,  to find out the information and support needs of those caring for people with epilepsy. The project contacted carers through the Society's Epilepsy Information Network and through their helpline, website and forum. As well as finding out what carers of people with epilepsy need, the project

Journal article

Specialist mental healthcare for children with epilepsy: child and adolescent mental health service liaison with neuroscience

Authors:
JOHNSTONE Ross J., MORTON Michael J. S.
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 33(10), October 2009, pp.384-386.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This paper presents a liaison model for the management of children with more complex epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Services used by children with epilepsy were seen by a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) liaison psychiatry team in the West of Scotland. Case notes of patients with epilepsy were reviewed to determine service involvement. The majority of patients attended

Journal article

Quality of life among people with epilepsy: implications for psychosocial intervention

Authors:
N. JANARDHAN, JOHNSON John, PARTHASARATHY R.
Journal article citation:
Indian Journal of Social Work, 68(3), July 2007, pp.369-379.
Publisher:
Tata Institute of Social Sciences

The psychosocial functioning and quality of life in a group of people with epilepsy whose seizures were well controlled were compared to those of a group where seizures were not well controlled (those attending a refractory clinic). The total sample consisted of 60 epileptic patients (30 from a refractory epilepsy clinic in Bangalore, India and 30 from a neurology out-patient department). Those whose epilepsy was not controlled had low psychosocial functioning and adjustment to epilepsy. The majority of people with uncontrolled epilepsy also reported high level of distress and more memory problems, problems in attention and concentration and language problems.

Journal article

Indicated benefits of bed epilepsy sensors to users of a telecare service in the Republic of Ireland

Author:
FISK Malcolm J.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 3(1), March 2009, pp.37-40.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper examines, by reference to a telecare service evaluation in the Republic of Ireland, the role and potential of bed epilepsy sensors. It points to benefits for both users and carers that arise from the sensors both enabling speedy responses in the event of a seizure, and in their providing reassurance and a better quality of life for both parties.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Neuropsychiatric morbidity in focal epilepsy

Authors:
ADAMS Sophia J., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 192(6), June 2008, pp.464-469.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Previous work has identified elevated prevalence rates for psychiatric disorders in individuals with medically refractory focal epilepsy, particularly temporal lobe epilepsy. Many studies were undertaken before the advent of video electroencephalogram monitoring (VEM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three hundred and nineteen individuals with focal epilepsy admitted for VEM were seen over an 11-year period. The lifetime history of depression and psychosis, epileptic site, laterality and type of lesion were determined by clinical assessment, VEM and MRI scan. There was a significant association between the prevalence of depressive symptoms and non-lesional focal epilepsy. There were no significant differences in prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders between the groups with temporal lobe epilepsy and those with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. These findings contrast with previous findings in smaller cohorts. The association between non-lesional focal epilepsy and depression may be due to the effects of a more diffuse epileptogenic area.

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