Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"dying"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 343

Book Full text available online for free

Let's talk about death and dying: how to have difficult conversations

Author:
CARTER Lesley
Publishers:
Age UK, Malnutrition Task Force
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
32
Place of publication:
London

This booklet is designed to help people start positive conversations about death with the people they care about to enable them to be sure that people's worries about dying and death are acknowledged. It looks at why it is important to talk about dying, barrier to having conversations about death, questions to talk about, and the physical changes that happen to people as they come to the end (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Using volunteers to support end-of-life care

Authors:
BIRD Sharon, et al
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 112(14), 2016, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

This article reports on an innovative model of care using trained volunteers to provide support and comfort for patients who were dying, their families and friends. The programme was introduced at a Liverpool Trust in 2012. Volunteers completed a training programme and also received support with regular supervision as well as psychological and peer support. The service found that volunteers can make a substantial contribution to meet the needs of people people who are dying and their families. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The provision of care for residents dying in UK nursing care homes

Authors:
KINLEY Julie, et al
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 43(3), 2014, pp.375-379.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Objectives: To identify the care currently provided to residents dying in UK nursing care homes. Method: Study participants were residents who had died within 38 nursing care homes in southeast England over a 3-year period. The nursing care homes had been recruited to take part in a cluster randomised controlled trial looking at different models of facilitation while implementing the Gold their last 6 months of life was variable. Conclusions: Nursing care homes have established links with some external healthcare providers. These links included the GP, palliative care nurses and physiotherapy. As dependency of resident increase with 56% residents dying within a year of admission these links need to be expanded. The provision of health care that meets the needs of future nursing care home

Book Full text available online for free

Time to choose: making choice at the end of life a reality

Author:
MACMILLAN CANCER SUPPORT
Publisher:
Macmillan Cancer Support
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
28

Macmillan's vision is that people who are nearing the end of life will be supported to make decisions that allow them and their family or carers to be prepared for their death; also that their care will be well coordinated and planned so that they die in the place and in the way that they have chosen. This report examines the importance of choice at the end of life and the barriers to such choice. It suggests solutions, for example having greater access to community services, improving planning and coordination, and providing free social care to people at the end of life. It also recommends that the Care Bill currently going through Parliament should make it clear that health services and local authorities have joint responsibility for identifying and signposting carers to information, advice and support. It concludes that there should be a "national choice offer", to ensure those people who want to die at home get the support they need. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

No dress rehearsals: four key priorities to ensure we get and of life care right first time

Author:
NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR PALLIATIVE CARE
Publisher:
National Council for Palliative Care
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

As the End of Life Care Strategy reaches its third anniversary, this document begins by drawing on the report  'Care and compassion' to highlight recent failures to meet the strategy in NHS care for older people. The National Council for Palliative Care and the Dying Matters coalition then present four key collective actions they believe need to be put into practice if society is to change how society cares for dying people. 1) Build capacity and capability in the community; 2) Support staff and professionals at all levels in changing attitudes; 3) Exercise leadership and equip champions for end of life care; and 4) Campaign and mobilise society.

Journal

Death Studies

Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

This journal covers the areas of bereavement and loss, grief therapy, death attitudes, suicide, and death education. It provides an international interdisciplinary forum for a variety of professionals share results of research and practice, with the aim of better understanding the human encounter with death and assisting those who work with the dying and their families. Coverage on Social Care

Book

Difficult conversations: making it easier to talk to people with dementia about the end of life

Author:
NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR PALLIATIVE CARE
Publisher:
National Council for Palliative Care
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
22p.
Place of publication:
London

This booklet provides advice for those caring for someone with dementia, unpaid or professional, who want to talk about end of life wishes to enhance quality of life. It is based on conversations with approximately fifty people affected by dementia; people with dementia; carers and former carers. The booklet briefly highlights why it is important to talk about end of life wishes, important areas to talk about, the consequences if issues aren't discussed and the best time to talk about end of life. Includes a list of useful resources.

Book Full text available online for free

Living well: thinking and planning for the end of your life

Authors:
HELEN SANDERSON ASSOCIATES, LANCASHIRE County Council
Publisher:
HSA Press
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
Stockport

A guide to help older people think about and record what is important to them now, and what they want in the future – i.e. end of your life planning. The whole guide, or just the sections that are relevant to an individual, can be completed either individually or with family, friends or staff.  It includes sections on: what is my history… my important memories?; thinking about relationships; what does a good day and a bad day look like for me?; what is important to me now, and how I want to be supported; what is working and not working in my life and what do I want to change?; if I could, I would…; what I want and do not want in the future - my hopes and fears; making changes to my life - my action plan. The guide has been based on the person centred thinking tools developed by The Learning Community for Person Centred Practices.

Digital Media

Can you see me?

Authors:
WARING Amanda, (Director)
Publisher:
National Council for Palliative Care
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
DVD
Place of publication:
London

This film aims to encourage providers and commissioners of end of life care to consider everyone in their community. It focuses on the needs of people who are often invisible, including those who are: homeless; in prison; have learning disabilities; are from black, minority ethnic communities; and who have conditions other than cancer. It describes end of life care needs, how to respond and ways to ask people what they want.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

St Christopher's blog: Malcolm Payne

Author:
PAYNE Malcolm;
Publisher:
St Christopher's Hospice
Place of publication:
London

Malcolm Payne's blog focuses on developments in social care and social work that affect palliative and end-of-life care. It is part of the information work of St Christopher's Hospice, London.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts