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Book

Dependency with dignity: different care provision for the elderly

Authors:
WADE Barbara, SAWYER Lucianne, BELL Judith
Publisher:
Bedford Square Press
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
252p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Follow-up to PHSO report: dying without dignity. First Report of Session 2015–16

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Parliament. House of Commons. Public Administration Select Committee
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
25
Place of publication:
London

This is a follow-up to the ‘Dying without dignity’ report which identified systemic issues affecting the quality and delivery of end of life care and used case studies to show how patients—and those close to them—had been affected by poor care. This report outlines the key areas in which significant and fast-paced improvements are expected. These are: culture, behaviour and training; the provision of integrated, 24/7 palliative and End of Life Care (EOLC) services; and leadership and commissioning. It also invites the Government to set out how it will ensure that the necessary improvements to end of life care provision are delivered. The report highlights the need to ensure that progress can be assessed objectively and suggests that clear targets for improvement are needed to enable such assessments. It concludes that comprehensive monitoring and reporting of progress against targets will also be required, and the Government must set out where responsibility for improving and monitoring end of life care lies. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Working with dignity: a study of the work done within Norwegian incest centres

Author:
PETTERSEN Kaare Torgny
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 16(1), 2013, pp.7-18.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

This study is based on empirical material from a survey among leaders from 19 of the 20 incest centres in Norway, as well as interviews with 13 workers from one of these centres. The Norwegian incest centre movement started in the mid 1980s. The study reveals that these non-governmental institutions understand child sexual abuse as a violation of dignity and that they place emphasis on working with dignity when they deal with victims of child sexual abuse and their families. They see themselves as a supplement to professional therapeutic institutions. They place emphasis on meeting victims of child sexual abuse and their families with the working principle of help to self-help and by being fellow human beings. All of the centres place emphasis on dealing with a violated dignity with security, intimacy, love, belonging, recognition, and respect. The study also shows that 43 per cent of the workers in these centres have themselves experienced child sexual abuse, and that their acknowledgement of previous indignity has given them a self-knowledge that helps them in their work with dignity in the Norwegian incest centres. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Creating a culture to deliver compassionate care

Author:
ONYETT Steve
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 3.4.12, 2012, p.12.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The Delivering Dignity report by the Commission on Dignity in Care for Older People provides direction on how to improve care for older people. Six inter-related issues are highlighted: interacting with care; staying compassionate; the 'Golden rule' of doing to others.  This article argues that a better understanding is needed of how to develop a sustainable culture. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Commitment to the care of people with dementia in general hospitals

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF NURSING
Publisher:
Royal College of Nursing
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
London

A statement outlining the Royal College of Nursing's commitment to the care of people with dementia. The statement outlines five key principles to improve the care of people with dementia in general hospital environments. Each principle is considered essential and additional factors are identified which will support their delivery based on guidance and best practice. It can be used as a checklist to help identify achievements an areas for further development.

Journal article

Five sources of hope for the deeply forgetful: dementia in the twenty-first century

Author:
POST Stephen G.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Care Services Management, 5(3), July 2011, pp.160-167.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Despite all efforts to the contrary, biomedical efforts to delay, prevent, or cure dementia have shown no significant success. This article argues that we need to reassess our perspective on hope, and understand the need for some redirection toward the larger questions of care when no cure is in sight. It argues that it seems appropriate at this point in time to focus more of our hope and possibly resources on care itself, and how we can create cultures that value people who are deeply forgetful. There is no ‘magic bullet’ available yet that promises to slow or cure dementia, although we can have hope in dietary modifications that may delay onset. We can also be hopeful in terms of: compassionate carers who manifest our deepest sense of a shared humanity despite cognitive decline; the increasing evidence for enduring selves beneath the chaos of neurological devastation; and the possibilities of a spiritual-cultural evolution toward acceptance, affirmation, and connection with the deeply forgetful.

Journal article

Stateless by any other name: refused asylum-seekers in the United Kingdom

Authors:
BLITZA Brad K., OTERO-IGLEIAS Miguel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 37(4), April 2011, pp.657-673.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

... on the respondents’ personal identity and created a situation of arbitrariness, rightlessness and extreme vulnerability. This central conclusion calls into question the application of key principles of human rights as they relate to refused asylum seekers, especially the tenets dignity, non-discrimination and the right to a family life.

Book Full text available online for free

DH interventions: dignity in care: input assessment

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
London

This report sets out the range of interventions and activities employed by The Department of Health in taking forward the Dignity in Care Campaign. These include funding and staffing resource, conference and events, websites, and media coverage.

Journal article

Dignity in care

Author:
PHILP Ian
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 11(2), June 2007, pp.11-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

The government's Dignity in Care agenda includes the establishment of a national network of older people's champions. The author, the National Director for Older People, explains what dignity in care means for health and social services, and the role of the Dignity in Care champions.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Dignity in care: choice and control

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
13 minutes 30 seconds
Place of publication:
London

Everyone has the right to make choices about how they live and how their support is provided. This film shows how people with care and support needs can be supported to have choice and control. Three examples shown are owning a budgerigar; deciding between mince with dumplings or a roast chicken dinner; and going shopping. The young men with learning disabilities who draw up their preferred shopping list travel to town unsupported, buy the food, come back and cook it and then eat it. It's important to take time to understand and know the person, their previous lives and past achievements, and to support people to develop things like ‘life story books'. If you treat people as equals, you can make sure they remain in control of what happens to them. (Edited publisher abstract)

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