Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"conduct disorders"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 1184

Journal article

Sustained performance and regulation of effort in clinical and non-clinical hyperactive children

Authors:
BERLIN L., et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(4), July 2003, pp.257-267.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Studied sustained performance and its relation to regulation of effort among 4 groups of children: 2 clinical sub-groups diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) – one with and one without comorbid oppositional defiant disorder (ODD); a control sample without a diagnosis of ADHD but with parental reports of hyperactivity; and a normal control sample. Sustained performance of 64 was studied using a choice reaction time task with long interstimulus intervals, and hyperactive behaviour and regulation of effort was rated throughout. The clinical sample differed from the normal controls regarding all measures of overall, but not initial, performance. When studying performance over time the ADHD group was shown to differ from the normal controls with regard to omissions, mean reaction time and regulation of effort. No significant differences were found between the ADHD children with or without comorbid ODD. The non-clinical hyperactive children differed from the normal controls with regard to reaction time, initially and overall, and regulation of effort overall. Deficits in sustained performance among ADHD children appear to be evident when long interstimulus intervals are used, and these are related to poor regulation of effort. Further, the observed differences between ADHD children and normal controls do not appear to be a result of comorbid conduct problems. The non-clinical hyperactive children were more similar to the control group than to the ADHD group.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Modifying behaviour: encopresis

Author:
BUNYAN A.
Journal article citation:
Adoption and Fostering, 11(3), 1987, pp.48-51.
Publisher:
British Association for Adoption and Fostering
Journal article

Mental disorders in juveniles who sexually offended: a meta-analysis

Authors:
BOONMANN Cyril, et al
Journal article citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 24, 2015, pp.241-249.
Publisher:
Elsevier

In order to establish the prevalence of mental disorders in juveniles who sexually offended (JSOs) a meta-analysis was carried out based on studies reporting on the prevalence rates of mental disorders in JSOs. Differences in mental disorders between JSOs and juveniles who offended non-sexually (non-JSOs) were also assessed. In total, 21 studies reporting on mental disorders in 2951 JSOs and 18,688 non-JSOs were included. In the total group of JSOs, 69% met the criteria for at least one mental disorder; comorbidity was present in 44%. The most common externalising and internalising disorders were respectively conduct disorder (CD; 51%) and anxiety disorder (18%). Compared to non-JSOs, JSOs were less often diagnosed with a Disruptive Behaviour Disorder (DBD, i.e., CD and/or Oppositional Deviant Disorder [ODD]), an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and a Substance Use Disorder (SUD). No significant differences were found for internalising disorders. In conclusion, although the prevalence of externalising disorders is higher in non-JSOs, mental disorders are highly prevalent in JSOs. Even though results of the current meta-analysis may overestimate prevalence rates (e.g., due to publication bias), screening of JSOs should focus on mental disorders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Context influences the motivation for stereotypic and repetitive behaviour in children diagnosed with intellectual disability with and without autism

Authors:
JOOSTEN Annette V., BUNDY Anita C., EINFELD Stewart L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 25(3), May 2012, pp.262-270.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Stereotypical and repetitive behaviours are part of normal child development. However while they diminish during the second year in typically developing children they often continue in those with intellectual disability and autism. Motivation seems to change with context, but there is little empirical evidence to support this. Data describing stereotypic behaviours from 279 Revised Motivation Assessment Scales (MAS:R) was evaluated using Rasch analysis. Data were gathered from two groups of Australian children (mean age 9.7 years): Group 1 with intellectual disability (n = 37) and Group 2 with both intellectual disability and autism (n = 37). Behaviour was examined in three contexts: free time, transition and while engaged in tasks. MAS:R distinguishes two intrinsic motivators: enhanced sensation and decreased anxiety and three extrinsic motivators: seeking attention or objects or escape. Significant differences in motivators were observed during free time and transition. No one motivator predominated while children were engaged in tasks. For both groups, sensory enhancement was a more likely motivator in free time and anxiety reduction was a more likely motivator during transition. Transition was the context most likely to influence extrinsic motivators, but there were significant differences between the groups. The authors conclude that context influences the motivation for stereotyped and repetitive behaviours; transition appears to have a particularly powerful effect.

Journal article

Learning patterns in social skills training programs: an exploratory study

Authors:
PREECE Sasha, MELLOR David
Journal article citation:
Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 26(2), April 2009, pp.87-101.
Publisher:
Springer

While Social Skills Training programs have been shown to improve the social skills of children with Disruptive Behaviour Disorders, the pattern of change in the participants’ learning during the training period remains unknown. Identifying this pattern could assist in determining whether more or less training hours are required to maximize the benefits of such programs within available resources. The current study aimed to replicate the social skills improvements found in previous research, and to explore the pattern of improvements in social knowledge and social performance that occurs during a Social Skills Training program. Two groups of eight males with behavioural problems attended 14 one-hour sessions of Social Skills Training. Multisources, multisettings and multimethods were used to measure social knowledge and social performance across five test phases. Multivariate analyses did not support previous findings showing overall improvements in social knowledge and social performance. Patterns of learning were not found to be consistent across different measures.

Journal article

Do perceptions of dysfunction and normality mediate clinicians' judgements of adolescent antisocial behavior?

Authors:
KIRK Stuart A., HSIEH Derek H.
Journal article citation:
Social Service Review, 83(2), June 2009, pp.245-266.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) requires clinicians making a judgment of mental disorder to first make complex mediating inferences about internal dysfunction and rule out the possibility that behaviours are normal reactions to a problematic environment. Responding to a case vignette in which the social context of antisocial behaviour was systematically varied, a sample of 1,500 social workers, psychologists, and psychiatrists made judgments about the presence of mental disorder, internal dysfunction, and normality in the antisocial behaviour of a youth. Perceptions about the presence of internal dysfunction and normality are found to be related to judgments of mental disorder, but they do not fully mediate the relationship between the influence of social context and judgments of mental disorder.

Journal article

Learning disabilities and serious crime - sex offences

Authors:
READ Fiona, READ Elspeth
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 6(1), April 2009, pp.37-51.
Publisher:
South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust and University of Huddersfield

This review paper follows on from two previous reviews of the literature with regard to, firstly, learning disability and murder and, secondly, learning disability and arson. This paper, in turn, examines the relationship, if any, between learning disability and sexual offence. The approach taken in all these papers involves the concept of Disruptive Behaviour Disorder as being the group of behaviour and personality disorders most involved in the aetiology of these criminal and anti-social behaviours. Disruptive behaviour disorders comprise: Oppositional Defiant Disorder Conduct Disorder; Anti-social Personality Disorder; Intermittent Explosive Disorder. The common characteristics of these disorders comprise aggression, irritability, over-activity, high arousal, and repetitive behaviour.

Journal article

Agitation in the morning: symptom of depression in dementia?

Authors:
THEISON Anna-Katharina, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(4), April 2009, pp.335-340.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Data were collected from three independent nursing homes in an urban setting in Germany. Trained nursing home staff pre-selected 110 demented and agitated patients with a minimum age of 60 years. Three main groups were formed based on agitation peak either: in the morning, evening or none. Each is respectively: sunrisers, sundowners and constants. Agitation was assessed by the same staff twice a day for a 2-week timeframe using the CMAI (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory); MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) for dementia re-evaluation and staging; CSDD (Cornell Score for Depression in Dementia) for depression screening. Sixty-three (60%) of all patients were depressive but only 16 patients of them were treated with antidepressants. Forty-four patients were classified as belonging to the sunriser group, 38 to the sundowners and 23 to the constants. There were no significant differences in depression between the three groups. The data supports that the diagnosis of depression is still often overlooked in demented and agitated persons .

Journal article

Combating the solitude of shame

Author:
HALL Paula
Journal article citation:
Therapy Today, 19(10), December 2008, pp.14-17.
Publisher:
British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

Discusses the benefits of group treatment programmes for men suffering with sexually compulsive behaviours.

Journal article

Behaviour problems and social competence deficits associated with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: effects of age and gender

Authors:
THORELL L. B., RYDELL A. M.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 34(5), September 2008, pp.584-595.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Previous research has shown that children with high levels of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms often have a wide variety of associated behaviour problems. However, relatively little is known regarding to what extent these associated behaviour problems are present to the same degree in younger as well as older children and in girls as well as in boys. This Swedish study used parent ratings to examine effects of age and gender on behaviour problems, social competence, negative impact on everyday life, and family burden among pre-school and school-aged children high in ADHD symptoms (n = 60) and comparison children (n = 499). With regard to age, the pre-school children did not differ from the school-aged children on any of the different types of problem behaviour or with regard to social competence. The interactions between age and group were not significant. The behaviour problems of older children did, however, have more negative impact on the child's daily life and induced higher levels of family burden compared with problems of younger children, especially among children with high levels of ADHD symptoms. Boys were more severely affected than girls with regard to ADHD symptom severity, most associated problem behaviours, as well as negative impact and family burden. Significant interactions of ADHD symptoms and gender were also found, which indicated that gender differences were primarily found among children with high levels of ADHD symptoms. Children with high levels of ADHD symptoms have many associated behaviour problems, even in pre-school years, and boys with high levels of ADHD symptoms are more severely affected compared with girls.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts