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Search results for ‘Subject term:"cerebral palsy"’ Sort:  

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Book

I felt like running away: the social and emotional implications of cerebral palsy

Authors:
BAMFORD David, GRIFFITHS Huw, KERNOHAN George
Publisher:
Boys' and Girls' Welfare Society
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
84p.,diags.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cheadle

Research report based on interviews with parents. Examines the impact on family life, and satisfaction or dissatisfaction with services received. Draws conclusions and makes recommendations for improvements in services.

Journal article

Conductors at the crossroads

Author:
REDDING Don
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 16.11.89, 1989, pp.15-18.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Economic and political pressures are threatening to undermine the work of Hungary's Peto Institute, which has become a victim of its own success.

Journal article

Conductors and the team approach

Author:
STEWART J.
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 17.11.88, 1988, p.20.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The multidisciplinary team approach to conductive education.

Journal article

Assistive devices and cerebral palsy: factors influencing the use of assistive devices at home by children with cerebral palsy

Authors:
HUANG I- C., SUGDEN D., BEVERIDGE S.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 35(1), January 2009, pp.130-139.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to explore the usability of assistive devices at home by children with cerebral palsy and consider the underlying factors related to the device usage in this setting mainly from the children's perspectives. Semi-structured interviews were adopted as the main data collection instrument. A total of 30 participants were involved in the study, including 15 Taiwanese children with cerebral palsy and 15 mothers. The results showed a low frequency of device use at home by the participating children. Four factors leading to low device use at home were identified, including children's reluctance, mothers' perspectives, physical environmental barriers and device-related barriers. The results highlight the need, when considering the usability of assistive devices, to take into account three interactive factors, namely, the personal, device and environmental factors. They also demonstrate the importance of taking children's different developmental stages and unique personal experiences into consideration in understanding the influence of assistive device intervention for children with cerebral palsy.

Journal article

Stress in parents of children with cerebral palsy: what sources of stress are we talking about?

Authors:
KETELAAR M., et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 34(6), November 2008, pp.825-829.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) often experience high levels of stress. Little is known however on the different sources of stress parents experience. This study aimed to explore the relation between aspects of parental distress in the parenting role and the child's limitations in functional skills and the child's behavioural difficulties, in parents of children with CP. A cross-sectional study among 42 parents of ambulatory children with CP (age 3–8 years; GMFCS levels I–III) was performed, using the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) and the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS). Regression analysis revealed that the PEDI Functional Skills and VABS Maladaptive behaviour scores explained 27% of the total variance in the PSI Parent domain total stress score. Maladaptive behaviour did significantly contribute to parental stress scores for the Parent domain subscales Attachment, Relationship with spouse, Depression, and, in particular, Sense of competence. Parents' functioning can be affected by behavioural aspects of the child with CP, and sense of competence could be an important variable in this relation. This emphasizes the importance of the development of specific interventions that support the family as a whole.

Book

The family business

Author:
MARSDEN Robert
Publisher:
British Association for Adoption and Fostering
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
142p.
Place of publication:
London

The Family Business is the true story of the adoption of William, a little boy with cerebral palsy, by a middle-aged couple with three birth children. It tells of the journey William and the other members of the family made to get to the point where they felt they were a whole family. The story describes the doubts of the parents in the early days, the confused feelings of William, and some of the frustrations and humorous adventures the family has had in the “disability world”. Narrated by the adoptive father, this is an honest and realistic account of adopting a child with a disability and the impact of adoption on the whole family. It explores the challenges of day-to-day family life and the importance of focusing on the child’s personality rather than his disability. Above all The Family Business provides a positive, upbeat account of the growth of love and the cementing of family bonds.

Digital Media

Stand up the real Glynn Vernon

Authors:
SCOPE, (Producer)
Publisher:
SCOPE
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
(25 mins.), videocassette
Place of publication:
London

Stand up the real Glynn Vernon is the story of one man’s views, opinions, beliefs and plans for the future from someone who happens to have Cerebral Palsy.

Journal article

A pilot study to compare the use of prototypes of multipositional paediatric walking sticks and tripods with conventional sticks and tripods by children with cerebral palsy

Authors:
TOMS B., HARRISON B., BOWER E.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(1), January 2007, pp.96-106.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The researchers designed prototypes of a walking stick and a tripod termed Multipositional Paediatric Walking Aids for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The design won the 'Jenx Award for Innovation in Paediatric Physiotherapy'. The object of this study was to ascertain whether the prototypes had any benefit over conventional designs in children with CP.A small case series within-subject comparison design was used. There were four periods, AABA, each 4 weeks in length. Prototypes were used during period B. Eight children with CP between 4 and 11 years were recruited, four used sticks and four used tripods. Following an orthopaedic assessment, each child had assessments at the Commencement of the study and every 4 weeks thereafter: (1) Energy used while walking using Physiological Cost Index (PCI). (2) Motor abilities using (a) Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88) and (b) Gross Motor Performance Measure (GMPM). (3) Hand/forearm position recorded on a visual analogue. (4) Parent/child questionnaire. Results Physiological Cost Index improved overall when the prototypes were used suggesting the amount of energy used when walking with the prototypes was less than with conventional sticks/tripods. GMFM-88 and GMPM results improved for some but not all children. Results for PCI, GMFM and GMPM were not statistically significant. The hand/forearm position of stick users consistently improved at assessment 4. Questionnaire results indicated that stick users preferred the prototypes. Multipositional sticks/tripods may have benefits over conventional sticks/tripods. Children using sticks rather than tripods preferred the prototypes. The study demonstrates the need to undertake scientifically controlled trials before marketing new equipment.

Book

I can't walk but I can crawl: living with cerebral palsy

Author:
ROSS Joan
Publisher:
Paul Chapman
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
212p.
Place of publication:
London

Joan is an adult with cerebral palsy who grew up when compulsory education was not in place for all children. Her memories of her childhood before inclusion, her development as a teenager and her adult life are chronicled without sentiment and this book offers the reader an autobiography of someone who lives with a significant disability. "I Can't Walk but I can Crawl" is supported by Scope who have provided an introduction and informative commentary about cerebral palsy. The book is of general interest and offers information and inspiration to Scope members and those whose lives are touched by cerebral palsy.

Journal article

A qualitative study, using focused interviews, of the information needs of families whose children's names are on a cerebral palsy register

Authors:
MILLER J., COLLIGAN J., COLVER A.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(6), November 2003, pp.465-471.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Focused interviews with 13 families selected by purposive sampling were used to investigate concern that information held on a register of children with cerebral palsy was not being made available to contributing families and that its existence and purpose were not sufficiently understood. Results showed that many parents would like more information about data on registers including their child, and to be more involved in the design of the register and its reports, but there are practical difficulties in making time available. Although parents were surprised they had not already been given more information about the register's existence and purpose, none were resentful that their child's name was on once reassured about confidentiality and database security. Parents also had general concerns, unrelated to the register, about their need to be treated as equals by professionals, to have more information about equipment and to have earlier and clearer diagnoses. Registers of children with uncommon conditions have well-established roles in epidemiology, planning and research. By fully involving parents in ways suggested by this study, registers can also empower parents. It should also provide reassurance to those who hold such registers without explicit consent that the requirement to now obtain consent should not create resentment or jeopardise completeness.

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