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Book Full text available online for free

'Independence allowance': developing a new vision for attendance allowance in England

Authors:
LLOYD James, STRATEGIC SOCIETY CENTRE, INDEPENDENT AGE
Publishers:
Strategic Society Centre, Independent Age
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
64
Place of publication:
London

At a time of intense pressure on public spending, and tightening eligibility criteria in the English social care system, this report asks: what is Attendance Allowance (AA) and how does the AA system function currently; and what are the options for making more use of the AA system in a way that improves both the outcomes of recipients and value-for-money in public spending? Two pieces of research published alongside this report are used: 'Attendance allowance in England' (Strategic Society Centre); and 'Attendance Allowance on a low income' (Independent Age). The report suggests that AA needs to be reformed, and identifies three distinct approaches: data-sharing; information and advice; and, supporting ‘independence behaviours’. It concludes that AA payments "need to be framed in more positive, empowering terms" and should therefore "adopt a new name that reflects the changed aims and aspirations for disability payments to older people: Independence Allowance." (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Disability benefits for older people: how does the UK attendance allowance system really work?

Author:
PUDNEY Steve
Publisher:
University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
32p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Colchester

Attendance Allowance is a system of cash benefits available, in principle, to everyone over the age of 65 with substantial care needs arising from physical or mental impairment. Recommendations for the diversion of resources from cash benefits have been made in the Wanless report and the government Green Paper on social care. This report argues that, before a decision can be made on the future of Attendance Allowance, it is important to understand how the system works in terms of its actual delivery of benefit to people, rather than its stated rules and aims. This report uses data from the UK Family Resources Survey for the 3 years 2002/3 – 2004/5 to analyse data on the relationship between disability and receipt of the Attendance Allowance disability benefit by older people. Despite being non-means-tested, the findings show that Attendance Allowance is implicitly income-targeted and strongly targeted on those with care needs. The analysis focuses particularly on the receipt of higher-rate benefit, intended for those in need of day-and-night care. Although the rules would suggest that the odds of receiving higher-rate payment would depend only on the extent of care needs, the findings showed that, in practice, higher-rate payments are significantly negatively related to age and income. The allocation of higher-rate Attendance Allowance awards also strongly favours people with physical rather than cognitive disabilities.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Alarm over allowances

Author:
HUNTER Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 17.9.09, 2009, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Government proposals in the green paper 'Shaping the future of care together'  have presented a risk that the attendance allowance could be integrated into the general social care system. This article reports on the opposition from disability user groups who believe the attendance allowance should remain a separate non-means tested benefit. A short case study showing the benefits the allowance provided one woman with a visual impairment is included.

Book Full text available online for free

The impact of disability benefits: a feasibility study

Author:
BERTHOUD Richard
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
44p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

An introduction giving the background on the benefits designed to meet disabled people's extra costs is followed by an overview of Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance, a chapter asking who benefits, and chapters on take-up, claims and adjudication; impacts on spending and outcomes; counterfactuals; data requirements; and the research plan. Information is given in tables and figures.

Book Full text available online for free

Review of international evidence on the cost of disability

Authors:
STAPLETON David, PROTIK Ali, STONE Christal
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
53p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Allowance programmes are a conceptually appealing way to help people with disabilities and their families pay for the goods and services that such individuals often need. This report examines how the international literature on the extra costs of disability could contribute to an assessment of the Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Attendance Allowance (AA) programmes in the UK The report presents rigorous evidence from a U.S. demonstration, that allowances can improve the lives of people with disabilities, relative to programmes that deliver agency services financed directly by the government. It also finds that, of all definitions of the extra cost of disability encountered in the literature, the 'expenditure equivalence' definition – the amount of additional income a person with a disability would require to achieve the same standard of living as a similar person without a disability - stands out as the most salient for assessing the adequacy of allowances. The report finds very little evidence from either programmes in other countries, or the research literature to support an assessment of allowance amounts in the UK programmes. A few studies, including a UK study, use the expenditure equivalence definition to demonstrate that the extra cost of disability can be very high, but their findings are not directly applicable to DLA and AA. The approach of these studies could potentially be applied to analysis of existing or new UK data in support of an assessment of the two programmes.

Book Full text available online for free

Streamlining the assessment of attendance allowance applications with social care assessment: an evaluation of two London pilots

Author:
HILTON John
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
London

Under the auspices of the LinkAge Plus programme, the Department for Work and Pensions commissioned two London boroughs to pilot a joining up of the process of applying for Attendance Allowance with the assessment for social care support. 'Streamlined assessment' is based on the principle that customers should provide information only once to access more than one service and that there is scope to adopt a customer-centred approach to service provision. This evaluation looks at the experiences and learning from the pilots.

Book

An introduction to disability living allowance

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Social Security. Benefits Agency
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Social Security. Benefits Agency
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
41p.,list of orgs.
Place of publication:
London

Booklet aimed at people who give advice and information to disabled people. Provides background information on: the background to DLA, the main changes, attendance allowance, qualifying conditions, the period of a DLA award, how to claim, how it is paid, review and appeal rights, how DLA affects other benefits, where the claim is processed, and who to direct enquiries to.

Book

Allowances and pensions for disability: a study of recipients' views of four schemes administered by the Department of Social Security, carried out on behalf of the National Audit Office

Authors:
COSTIGAN Paddy, RITCHIE Jane, WHITE Clarissa
Publisher:
Social and Community Planning Research
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
93p.,tables.
Place of publication:
London

The schemes examined were: attendance allowance; mobility allowance; invalid care allowance; and war pensions.

Journal article

The five year battle

Authors:
LLOYD Jeremy, FRANKLIN Julia
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 27.9.90, 1990, p.10.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

From the 1st October 1990 people with a terminal illness will be able to claim Attendance Allowance without having to meet the usual qualifying rules - this marks the culmination of a five year campaign by the Association of Hospice Workers.

Journal article

When help is at a premium

Author:
BENNETT Tony
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.8.90, 1990, pp.23-26.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Many frail elderly people are missing out on Attendance Allowance and the new Severe Disability Premium.

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