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Journal article

The prevalence of anxiety in older adults: methodological issues and a review of the literature

Authors:
BRYANT Christina, JACKSON Henry, AMES David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Affective Disorders, 109(3), 2008, pp.233-250.
Publisher:
Elsevier

A systematic review of literature on anxiety in people over 60, published between 1980 and 2007, finds prevalence rates for anxiety disorders of 1.2% to 15% in community settings, and 1% to 28% in clinical settings. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms is much higher, ranging from 15% to 52.3% in community samples, and 15% to 56% in clinical samples. These discrepancies are partly attributable to conceptual and methodological inconsistencies in the literature. The review finds that Generalised Anxiety Disorder is the most common anxiety disorder among older people, but issues relating to co-morbidity and the nature of anxiety in old age remain unresolved. This hampers the design of interventions and highlights the need for further research with a primary focus on anxiety.

Journal article

Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment

Authors:
FIELDER Andrea Louise, et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 8(4), 2015, pp.179-192.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: This paper tests the effectiveness of a self-directed cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) booklet allowing immediate access to treatment for anxiety during alcohol use disorder (AUD) interventions. Design/methodology/approach: Parallel pilot randomised controlled trial: 69 individuals in AUD treatment, continued to receive treatment alone (control: n=29) or in addition, a self-directed, four week CBT booklet to manage anxiety (intervention: n=40). Primary outcome measures were changes in state (SAnx) and trait anxiety (TAnx) at four weeks. Secondary outcome measures were changes in adaptive (ACop), maladaptive (MCop) coping and quality of life (QoL, physical (PHQoL), psychological (PSQoL), social (SQoL), environment (EQoL)) at four weeks. Findings: Participants had significantly higher SAnx and TAnx baseline scores compared to the general population. There were no statistically significant group changes in SAnx or TAnx. Control group allocation predicted improvement in ACop, MCop, PHQoL, PSQoL and SQoL; CBT group allocation predicted improvement in EQoL. All effect sizes were small to moderate. Percentage of book completion did not determine changes in anxiety, coping or quality of life. Originality/value: A four week self-directed CBT booklet did not significantly reduce anxiety during AUD treatment. Larger sample sizes will determine the most suitable treatment delivery mode for this type of CBT. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Failure and delay in treatment-seeking across anxiety disorders

Authors:
JOHNSON Emily M., COLES Meredith E.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 49(6), 2013, pp.668-674.
Publisher:
Springer

Anxiety disorders are a significant mental health problem. Despite the availability of effective treatments most sufferers do not seek help. The current study assesses delays in treatment-seeking, failure to seek treatment, and reasons for delaying treatment for individuals with anxiety disorders. Data were drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Surveys including 3,805 participants and analyses focused on treatment-seeking variables. Results indicate that individuals with anxiety disorders are less likely to seek treatment from a professional and more likely to experience delays in obtaining both any treatment, and effective treatment, than individuals with other forms of mental illness (in this case unipolar depression or substance use disorders). Deficits in mental health literacy (knowledge and beliefs about mental illness) were commonly endorsed as reasons for having delayed seeking treatment. The current study highlights the importance of improving knowledge about anxiety disorders to improve treatment-seeking. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Women coping with chronic disease: the psychosocial impact of lupus

Authors:
AUERBACH Charles, BECKERMAN Nancy L., BLANCO Irene
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Service Research, 39(5), 2013, pp.606-615.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

... providing services to patients with lupus. Key findings include the following: Frequent flare-ups resulted in the highest need for assistance with feelings of depression, anxiety, and socioeconomic challenges. Hair loss had the most significant impact on depression, anxiety, and socioeconomic coping. Being hospitalized in the past year for lupus also significantly impacted depression, anxiety, and socioeconomic coping. And, finally, the participants reported that having friends to rely on reduced their reported depression and anxiety. Fatigue from lupus was seen as the highest correlate of anxiety. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Self-concept in early stage dementia: profile, course, correlates, predictors and implications for quality of life

Authors:
CLARE Linda, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 28(5), 2013, pp.494-503.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

... and the distribution did not differ significantly from expected values. Although caregiver ratings were slightly lower, discrepancies were small. There were no significant changes over time in self-ratings or informant ratings or discrepancies. At Time 1, self-ratings were predicted by anxiety, depression and memory, caregiver ratings were predicted by caregiver distress and by depression in the person with dementia and discrepancies were predicted by caregiver distress. These models remained predictive at later time points. Self-rated self-concept predicted quality of life, with the relationship only partially mediated by depression and anxiety. Self-concept appears largely intact in early stage dementia, but in view of the association between self-concept and quality of life, a preventive approach focused on supporting (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Normative data for the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS) in multiple sclerosis

Authors:
ATKINS Lizzy, NEWBY Gavin, PIMM John
Journal article citation:
Social Care and Neurodisability, 3(4), 2012, pp.172-178.
Publisher:
Emerald

Depression and anxiety are common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study aimed to investigate the use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS) as a useful tool for measuring anxiety and depression in people with MS who live in the community. Another aim was to provide normative data specific to MS to help in the assessment of anxiety and depression for clinicians and researchers. The study was part of a larger community postal survey investigating the relationship between mood and self-reported cognitive difficulties in MS. A total of 144 individuals with MS in this study completed the HADS. The findings showed that individuals with MS report significantly greater levels of anxiety and depression than a healthy population, with prevalence rates of moderate/severe anxiety

Journal article

Researching the mental health status of asylum seekers: reflections and suggestions for practice

Authors:
BERNARDES Dora, WRIGHT John, LIVINGSTONE Andrew G.
Journal article citation:
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care, 9(3), 2012, pp.201-208.
Publisher:
Insight Medical Publishing

This study investigated aspects of the mental health of asylum seekers who had recently arrived in the UK. It used the Post-Migration Living Difficulties Scale, the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, the PTSD Symptom Scale Interview, the Clinical Outcomes Routine Evaluation and in-depth interviews. A total of 29 asylum seekers, 26 of whom were male, representing 13 countries, agreed to take

Journal article

Understanding catastrophizing from a misdirected problem-solving perspective

Authors:
FLINK Ida K., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Health Psychology, 17(2), May 2012, pp.408-419.
Publisher:
British Psychological Society

Catastrophising is an irrational thought leading to a belief that something is far worse than it actually is. This study investigated “pain catastrophising” from a problem-solving perspective. The links between catastrophising, problem framing, and problem-solving behaviour are examined through two possible models of mediation – the misdirected problem solving model and the fear-anxiety-avoidance model. A general population sample of 173 from three counties in middle Sweden with perceived problems with spinal pain filled out questionnaires twice; catastrophising and problem framing were assessed on the first occasion and health care seeking was assessed 7 months later. Findings confirmed the concepts included in the misdirected problem solving model. However, the direction of the relations was more in line with the fear-anxiety-avoidance model. More specifically, the mediation analyses provided support for viewing catastrophising as a mediator of the relation between medical problem framing and medically oriented problem-solving behaviour. The authors highlighted the need to examine and address problem framing and catastrophising in back pain patients.

Journal article

Depression: a modifiable factor in fearful older fallers transitioning to frailty?

Authors:
MHAOLÁIN Aine M. Ni, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(7), July 2012, pp.727-733.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

... associated with fear of falling in a group of fallers transitioning to frailty compared with robust or non-frail fallers. A total of 301 fallers (mean age 75 years) underwent assessment. Fear of falling was measured using the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale, and frailty using the Biological Syndrome Model. Psychological assessment included anxiety, depression, loneliness, personality factors and cognition.

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People with Asperger syndrome and employment

Authors:
HILL Elisabeth, McINTOSH Barbara, PERKINS David
Publisher:
Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

... 15% of those with Asperger syndrome are in employment. This report presents the findings of a small project in which four adults with Asperger Syndrome were supported at work. During the project a mental health occupational therapy specialist and an employment consultant jointly ran sessions with each participant to identify areas of difficulty that cause anxiety. These areas were addressed

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