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Journal article

Prevalence and correlates of Capgras syndrome in Alzheimer's Disease

Authors:
HARWOOD Dylan G., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14(6), June 1999, pp.415-420.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The American study examines the prevalence and clinical correlates of Capgras Syndrome (CS) in Alzheimer's Disease, where patients believe that others, their husband, children and doctors, have been replaced by imposters. Results found that CS was prevalent in approximately ten percent of the community-dwelling AD sample. This syndrome was more common at the later stages of the illness and showed relations with increased functional impairment and other psychotic symptomatology.

Journal article

Humour, irony and sarcasm in severe Alzheimer's dementia - a corrective to retrogenesis?

Author:
MOOS Inger
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(2), February 2011, pp.328-346.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Retrogenesis is claimed to be the process by which degenerating mechanisms in the brain, as found in Alzheimer's disease, reverse the order of acquisition of functions in normal child development, including language. The aim of this study was to analyse the communicative competence of people with moderately severe Alzheimer's disease according to FAST (Functional Assessment Staging of Alzheimer's disease) as to the occurrence of humour, irony and sarcasm in conversations with their professional caregivers. The study used data from an earlier study analysing audio recordings of everyday conversations between nursing home residents in Denmark with Alzheimer's disease and their professional caregivers, and focused on 3 participants. The article reports on analysis of the findings from the interviews, with examples. The author concludes that the comprehension and production of humour, irony and sarcasm of the 3 participants in the study are correctives to retrogenesis concerning speech and language abilities in severe Alzheimer's disease.

Journal

Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Publisher:
Elsevier

This is the journal of the Alzheimer's Association in the United States. It publishes the results of studies in: behaviour, biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, pharmacology, physiology, protein chemistry, neurology, neuropathology, psychiatry, geriatrics, neuropsychology, epidemiology, sociology, health services research, health economics, political science and public policy. Content emphasizes interdisciplinary investigations, integrative/translational articles, related to: etiology, risk factors, early detection, disease modifying interventions, prevention of dementia and applications of new technologies in health services. Coverage on Social Care Online from this journal is limited to relevant systematic reviews only.

Journal

Alzheimers Disease Society Newsletter

Publisher:
Alzheimers Disease Society
Digital Media Full text available online for free

Practical approaches to minimising restraint

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
8 minutes 20 seconds
Place of publication:
London

This film uses two examples to illustrate how restraint can be minimised. The first example describes the experience of Peter, who is living in a care home and has a urinary tract infection. A common side effect of such infections is confusion, which is made worse by Peter's Alzheimer's disease. The second story is about Florence, a lady in her 80's who had developed a chest infection and had been admitted to hospital suffering delirium. Key messages for practice are: sometimes it is necessary to apply restraint in the person's best interests; the need for restraint has to be reassessed on each and every occasion as people's needs and capacity change; using a person-centred approach and understanding a person's life story is vital; and talking with colleagues, carers families and people who use services can help to minimise restraint. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A technology-aided program for helping persons with Alzheimer's disease perform daily activities

Authors:
LANCIONI Giulio E., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Enabling Technologies, 11(4), 2017, pp.85-91.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer’s disease experience increasing activity engagement failures, with consequent cognitive, social, and physical drawbacks. The purpose of this paper is to assess a technology-aided program to help these persons to independently start and carry out daily activities at the appropriate times. Design/methodology/approach: The program was implemented with eight participants according to an adapted non-concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. The program provided each participant with: timely reminders about the activities to carry out, verbal instructions about the activity steps, and brief encouragements and praise. Findings: All participants showed improvement during the program, that is, they managed to independently start the activities at the scheduled times and perform those activities with satisfactory levels of accuracy (i.e. with mean percentages of correct steps nearing or exceeding 90). Originality/value: A technology-aided program, such as that used in this study, may help persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer disease engage in daily activities, with possible benefits for their cognitive functioning, social image, and physical condition. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A qualitative study on becoming cared for in Alzheimer's disease: the effects to women's sense of identity

Authors:
BORLEY Gayle, HARDY Shelia
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 21(10), 2017, pp.1017-1022.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objective: To explore the lived experience of becoming cared for and the impact this has on the identity and sense of self of women with Alzheimer's disease. Method: Eight women with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease were interviewed in Northamptonshire, England, on two separate occasions about their experiences relating to needing assistance with instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the approach used to underpin this research. Results: Changes in the women's identity affected by the increased need for assistance with IADL tasks were expressed in terms of: who I am; unhappy being me; fighting to remain me; I'm not the same, but it doesn't worry me; and acceptance and contentment. Conclusion: This study offers an alternative perspective to the view that all women with Alzheimer's disease experience becoming cared for as a negative event in their lives. Some factors universally perceived as being a result of Alzheimer's disease may be a normal part of the life course. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Caregiver burden in family carers of people with dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease

Authors:
SVENDSBOE Ellen, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 31(9), 2016, pp.1075-1083.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: To characterise the differences in caregiver distress between carers of people diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), with a view to differentiating and improving support for caregivers. Methods: This study is a part of two larger Norwegian studies, DemVest (n = 265) and The Norwegian Dementia Register (n = 2220), with data from caregivers and people diagnosed with AD (n = 100) and DLB (n = 86) between 2005 and 2013. The average age was 74.9 years (SD = 7.8). Caregiver distress was rated by the Relative Stress Scale. Diagnosis of the person receiving care was based on a comprehensive standardised assessment program (International Classification of Diseases, Revision 10 or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fourth edition). Additional data collected from people receiving care were neuropsychiatric symptoms, comorbidity and activities of daily living (ADL) score. Linear regression analyses were applied, first unadjusted and then in stepwise-adjusts in addition to descriptive analyses. Results: Caregivers to people with AD (20.2%) and 40% of caregivers for people with DLB experienced moderate or high caregiver burden with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders in the early stage of dementia. High Relative Stress Scale (RSS) total scores in caregivers was significantly associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms and also with impaired ADL functioning. Conclusion: Caregiver distress differed between people caring for someone with AD (15.0) and those caring for someone with DLB (19.9). These findings have direct implications for the needs and resources that could be available for these individuals and indicate the need for further research into caregiver burden in carers to people with DLB. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

New approaches to understanding dementia

Author:
GINESI Laura
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 112(25), 2016, pp.16-19.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Improving understanding of brain disorders is likely to be one of the core aims of physiological research in the 21st century. This article, the second in a four-part series, looks at the main types of dementia and explores emerging theories about how the condition develops. These theories are improving understanding of the neuro-degeneration that characterises the most common forms of dementia, and will help improve care for those living with dementia. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A methodological critique of the National Institute of Aging and Alzheimer’s Association Guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and mild cognitive impairments

Authors:
GARRETT Mario D., VALLE Ramon
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 15(2), 2016, pp.239-254.
Publisher:
Sage

In 2011, the U.S. National Institute on Aging published guidelines for clinical diagnostics for Alzheimer’s disease dementia. These guidelines define a continuum with three stages—an early, pre-clinical stage with no symptoms, followed by mild cognitive impairment, and a final stage of Alzheimer’s disease dementia. This methodological critique examines the validity of this continuum. No studies exist showing the progression of these biomarkers to Alzheimer’s disease. There is also a lack of empirical evidence showing how biomarkers determine mild cognitive impairment, which has multiple etiologies. The guidelines fail to explain anomalies where there are biomarkers but no expression of Alzheimer’s disease. (Publisher abstract)

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