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Book

Ageism: a benchmark of public attitudes in Britain

Authors:
RAY Sujata, SHARP Ellen, ABRAMS Dominic
Publisher:
Age Concern England
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
74p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Ageism is not obvious.  But it may result in  having different treatment at your local GP’s surgery or your local hospital or affect you when applying for holiday or car insurance. It may even stop you getting a job. Ageism has a dramatic, detrimental effect on older people but this is often not acknowledged. Age Concern is highlighting this as a major issue that needs to be addressed in order to ensure the fair treatment of older people.

Book

Ageism

Author:
BYTHEWAY Bill
Publisher:
Open University Press
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
154p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Buckingham

Reviews the literature on ageism and sets it in a historical context. Considers the settings in which ageism can occur and identifies issues that are basic in determining a theory of ageism. Includes case studies.

Book

Aspects of ageism: a discussion paper

Author:
NORMAN Alison
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
23p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Safe later lives: older people and domestic abuse

Author:
SAFELIVES
Publisher:
SafeLives
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
31
Place of publication:
London

This report focuses on older victims of domestic abuse, a group often overlooked in the literature that tends to focus on younger victims and perpetrators. It estimates that in the last year approximately 120,000 individuals aged 65+ have experienced at least one form of abuse (psychological, physical, sexual or financial). The report outlines the following six key findings: systematic invisibility of older people who are not represented in domestic abuse services and lack of recognition amongst some professionals of the phenomenon; long term abuse and dependency issues, which may add additional pressures to stay with an abusive partner; generational attitudes about abuse may make it hard to identify; increased risk of adult family abuse; services are not effectively targeted at older victims, and do not always meet their needs; and need for more coordination between services. The report argues that social care services need training to understand the dynamics of abuse in a caring relationship; they should target older people with messages that empower them to recognise their situation as abuse, and raise awareness of support available; and that services working with adults and their older parents must be trained to recognise abuse, and have clear referral pathways. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental health service discrimination against older people

Authors:
ANDERSON David, et al
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 37(3), 2013, pp.98-103.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

To provide a picture of availability and equality of access to mental health services for older people prior to the Equality Act. In 2010, a questionnaire was sent to health commissioners in England, Scotland and Wales under a Freedom of Information request. This information was requested for 11 services: in-patient, out-patient, community mental health team (CMHT), CRHT (24 hours and office hours), assertive outreach, intermediate care, dedicated general hospital liaison, rehabilitation, low secure, and specialist psychotherapy. Overall, 132 (76%) replied. Of 11 services, 7 were either unavailable or did not provide equality of access to older people in more than a third of commissioning areas. The greatest inequality found for CRHT and assertive outreach services preferentially developed to serve the needs of younger adults. When provided by specialist older people’s mental health, services were more often considered to ensure equality. Increasing need resulting from an ageing population is unlikely to be met in the face of current inequality. Inequality on the basis of age is the result of government policy and not the existence of specialist services for older people. Single age-inclusive services may create indirect age discrimination. Availability alone is insufficient to demonstrate equality of access. Monitoring the effects of legislation must take this into account. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

When is a carer’s employment at risk? Longitudinal analysis of unpaid care and employment in midlife in England

Authors:
KING Derek, PICKARD Linda
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(3), 2013, pp.303-314.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article examines the thresholds at which provision of unpaid care affects employment in England. Previous research has shown that providing care for 20 or more hours a week has a negative effect on employment. The present article explores the impact of a lower threshold and asks whether provision of care for 10 or more hours a week has a negative effect on employment. The article focuses on women and men aged between 50 and State Pension Age (60 for women, 65 for men). The study uses data from the first four waves of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), collected in 2002/2003, 2004/2005, 2006/2007 and 2008/2009. Across these waves, there are 17 123 people aged 50–59/64 years, of whom 9% provide unpaid care to an adult. Using logistic regression analysis of the longitudinal data, the study finds that employed women in their fifties who start providing care for <10 hours a week are significantly more likely to remain in employment one wave later than similar women who have not started to provide care. In contrast, employed women in their fifties who start providing care for 10 or more hours a week are significantly less likely to remain in employment one wave later than similar women who have not started to provide care. Employed men aged between 50 and State Pension Age, who provide care for 10 or more hours a week at the beginning of the period have a significantly reduced employment rate one wave later than those who do not provide care. The study therefore suggests that carers’ employment may be negatively affected when care is provided at a lower intensity than is generally estimated in England. This has important implications for local authorities, who have a duty to provide services to carers whose employment is at risk. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Government Equalities Office: Equality Bill: making it work: ending age discrimination in services and public functions

Author:
THE ACTUARIAL PROFESSION
Publisher:
The Actuarial Profession
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
London

The Equality Bill, published on 27 April 2009, will make it unlawful to discriminate against someone aged 18 or over because of age when providing services or carrying out public functions. It will not affect products or services for older people where age-based treatment is justified or beneficial. The law will only stop age discrimination where it has negative or harmful consequences. The original intention was for the new law to be implemented in phases, with legislation in force in financial services and all other services, with the exception of health and social care, in 2012. In January 2010, the Government Equalities Office (GEO) produced two policy statements relating to the Equality Bill. A consultation on the national review began on 23 November 2009 and ended on 15 February 2010. This is the consultation document which requested feedback on whether to create specific exceptions around age for health and social care within the legislation.

Journal article

Is ageism in university students associated with elder abuse?

Authors:
YON Yongjie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 8(4), 2011, pp.386-402.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

Previous research suggests young adults, compared to middle aged adults, display higher levels of ageist attitudes toward older people and that elder abuse is increasing. However, little attention has been given to elder abuse by young adults in general. This study investigated the likelihood of elder abuse by young adults enrolled in a university. A total of 206 students completed questionnaires on attitudes toward older persons and their proclivity to elder abuse. Findings suggest that student attitudes were correlated with elder abuse. Proclivity to psychological abuse was 32%, compared to physical abuse at 2.4%. Psychological abuse included stomping out the room, name calling, and shouting or yelling. Threats and destruction of property were less common. The authors concluded that resources should be allocated to existing services in order to raise awareness of the increasing vulnerability of older people, and encourage better intergenerational dialogue.

Journal article

Prevalence and correlates of perceived workplace discrimination among older workers in the United States of America

Authors:
CHOU Rita Jing-Ann, CHOI Namkee G.
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(6), August 2011, pp.1051-1070.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Based on data about 420 older workers aged 50 years and above from a national survey (Midlife in the United States II), this study examined the prevalence of perceived workplace discrimination among older workers, and sociodemographic factors that are associated with workplace discrimination. The analysis indicated that more than 81% of the older workers encountered at least one workplace discriminatory treatment within a year. The article includes tables with details of types and prevalence of perceived workplace discrimination among older workers and differences with age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupation and wage. Lower education, racial/ethnic minority status and lower wages were associated with higher prevalence of perceived workplace discrimination. The findings also showed that supervisor support was more essential than co-worker support in alleviating perceived workplace discrimination. The authors conclude that as older adults are increasing workforce participation, reducing workplace discrimination against older workers deserves more attention.

Book Full text available online for free

A long time coming: part 1: strategies for achieving age equality in mental health services

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
27p.
Place of publication:
Bath

This document reports on the findings of the Achieving Age Equality in Mental Health Network. The Network ran from November 2010 to March 2011 and consisted of 4 different elements: development support to 2 localities based in the Midlands; a call for information on practical examples of age equality in mental health services; analysis of local and national data; and a review of concurrent national and development programmes. The development support provided to the 2 health and social care communities in the Midlands involved the audit of local mental health services to establish whether and where age discrimination exists and to identify priority actions for developing cost effective and inclusive mental health systems for all ages. This document is the first of 2 reports arising from this work. It focuses on the findings, key messages and priorities for achieving age equality. It identifies the critical issues that need urgent attention in order to eradicate age discrimination in mental health services everywhere. A central message is the need for much greater clarity and a shared understanding about age equality in respect of mental health and mental health services. The report sets out 4 priority actions identified by the Network that need to be taken forward at both a local and a national level.

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