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Journal article

Pay and dismay

Authors:
ANDREWS Chrispin, AKANDE Michelle
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.05.05, 2005, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on some of the ongoing difficulties and barriers that exist in implementing direct payments. Presents the experiences of one user of direct payments in Manchester who eventually resigned from the scheme when it left her without the care she needed.

Journal article

We need support too

Author:
THORP Samantha
Journal article citation:
Children Now, 25.05.05, 2005, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
Haymarket

The Parenting Fund was set up as a way to get voluntary and community parenting support programmes to a wider audience. Reports on some of the projects that have benefited from the fund so far. Includes details of the Parent Support Project at Asperger East Anglia; the Centre for Fatherhood in Durham and the Speakeasy project which helps parents talk to their children about sex and relationships.

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Reaching parents: implementing parenting programmes

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
3p.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing highlights strategies for making parenting programmes more accessible and acceptable to socially disadvantaged families. Strategies are grouped into two main areas: a) making changes to the delivery of programmes and b) making changes at a more strategic level. A number of possible strategies are listed under each heading.

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LGBTQ & caring

Authors:
CARERS WALES, PRIDE CYMRU
Publisher:
Carers Wales
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This booklet provides information for unpaid carers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans* or queer (LGBTQ+), looks at the additional challenges they face and outlines what support is available. It includes help on identifying as a carer, managing the caring journey and accessing support, as well as information on end-of-life affairs. It also includes the real stories of LGBTQ+ carers across Wales, who have benefited from support. (Edited publisher abstract)

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A healthy state of mind: improving young people's mental fitness

Author:
CHANNA Kulvir
Publisher:
Localis
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
50
Place of publication:
London

This report focuses on how to create a mental health system which supports young people earlier and with far greater flexibility than presently exists. The report examines: the impact of the first point of contact on young people as they initially seek help with their mental fitness; how to increase the availability of support and guidance from non-mental health professionals, and improve existing access points for young people as they seek out information; and how encouraging young people to have greater resilience, agency and independence will have a positive effect on how specialist CAMHS are able to deliver their services. The report highlights the need to better help young people with their mental health. Addressing severe mental health issues earlier and supporting greater mental fitness gives agency and independence to young people as they cope with difficult and often distressing circumstances. The report suggests that reforms to the mental health system must allow young people who are in crisis to access the specialist services they need far more quickly. The wide body of non-mental health professionals working with young people – as part of the community around them – can be better equipped and prepared to provide the right support under such an approach. Encouraging greater provision of school-based mental health support and providing statutory school-based support is one method of securing this within the education sector. Also, further training in mental health can support teachers, social workers and GPs alike. Whilst the report focuses on specific professional settings (e.g. schools, care settings), the principle that underpins the thinking is universal: where possible support young people in a way that encourages resilience in their mental wellbeing and focus specialist resources on supporting those presenting with severe mental health issues. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Is this inside public space dementia-inclusive? A checklist for use by dementia groups

Authors:
INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. Edinburgh Centre for Research on the Experience of Dementia, HAMMONDCARE. Dementia Centre
Publisher:
Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8

A checklist to assess how inclusive inside public spaces, such as leisure centres and cafes, are for people with dementia. The checklist has been designed to help dementia groups when carrying out environmental audits of venues and facilities and covers ten key areas to consider. It has been tested and refined by members of DEEP (The Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project). (Edited publisher abstract)

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Is this outside public space dementia-inclusive?

Authors:
INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. Edinburgh Centre for Research on the Experience of Dementia, HAMMONDCARE. Dementia Centre
Publisher:
Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8

A checklist to assess how inclusive outside public spaces, such as parks or approaches to public buildings are for people with dementia. The checklist has been designed to help dementia groups when carrying out environmental audits of venues and facilities and covers nine key areas to consider. It has been tested and refined by members of DEEP (The Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project). (Edited publisher abstract)

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Addressing barriers to work for disabled people and those with long term health conditions in Brighton & Hove: research report

Authors:
BENNETT Lauren, RAY Kathryn, WILSON Tony
Publisher:
Learning and Work Institute
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
65
Place of publication:
Leicester

A research study into the barriers to employment, volunteering and skills development for disabled people and individuals with long term health conditions in Brighton & Hove. The research comprised a scoping stage, stakeholder research and consultation workshops. Key themes covered in the report include: experiences of employment support – those further from work wanted more intensive and personalised employment support, including help to prepare for work, look for work and to apply for jobs and disabled people’s experiences of support often reflected the quality of their relationship with the adviser or staff who supported them; provision of support in Brighton & Hove – there is a range of provision available in Brighton & Hove, but a lack of awareness of such provision amongst employees and local residents; experiences of employment – some employers held misconceptions about disabled people and individuals with health conditions, including the automatic assumption that disabled employees would have a physical impairment and therefore be unsuitable for certain roles; support for employers – when employers received appropriate support, this was often key to their decision and ability to hire a disabled person. However, there was a lack of awareness of wider local and national support services amongst employers and employees. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Safe later lives: older people and domestic abuse

Author:
SAFELIVES
Publisher:
SafeLives
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
31
Place of publication:
London

This report focuses on older victims of domestic abuse, a group often overlooked in the literature that tends to focus on younger victims and perpetrators. It estimates that in the last year approximately 120,000 individuals aged 65+ have experienced at least one form of abuse (psychological, physical, sexual or financial). The report outlines the following six key findings: systematic invisibility of older people who are not represented in domestic abuse services and lack of recognition amongst some professionals of the phenomenon; long term abuse and dependency issues, which may add additional pressures to stay with an abusive partner; generational attitudes about abuse may make it hard to identify; increased risk of adult family abuse; services are not effectively targeted at older victims, and do not always meet their needs; and need for more coordination between services. The report argues that social care services need training to understand the dynamics of abuse in a caring relationship; they should target older people with messages that empower them to recognise their situation as abuse, and raise awareness of support available; and that services working with adults and their older parents must be trained to recognise abuse, and have clear referral pathways. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Mapping therapeutic services for sexual abuse in the UK in 2015

Authors:
ALLNOCK Debbie, SNEDDON Helga, ACKERLEY Elizabeth
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire. International Centre
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
100
Place of publication:
London

Sets out the results of a mapping exercise to identify UK specialist and non-specialist therapeutic services for children and young people who have experienced sexual abuse, including sexual exploitation. It investigated the gap between met and unmet need, services' experiences of funding and commissioning and the nature of services provided to children and young people. The report reveals an overall gap (a 12% current gap and an anticipated gap of 17% in future) in referral provision across the services in the sample to children and young people who have experienced child sexual abuse / exploitation. The mapping exercise revealed that a large number of services across the UK comprised of both specialist and generalist services which exist across statutory, voluntary and private sectors and in some case comprise multiagency initiatives. Across specialist services, funding continues to be provided through insecure and short-term funding cycles which are at odds with the nature of the provision required to adequately support children and young people with these experiences. CAMHs remain difficult to access and the situation appears to be declining in some areas in the face of funding cuts in recent years. Almost all services, however, set eligibility criteria to restrict access. Age is one of the more common criteria and the mapping exercise has shown that, at least among the current sample, services for younger children are scarce while services for older children and adolescents are in somewhat greater supply. There report makes three priority recommendations which have emerged from the mapping exercise: the need for better data on referrals; the need for comprehensive support for children and young people; and the need for a more stable and less complex commissioning and funding process. (Edited publisher abstract)

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