Filter results

Search results for ‘Subject term:"therapeutic horticulture"’ Sort:  

Results 11 - 20 of 41

Journal article

Green care and mental health: gardening and farming as health and social care

Author:
SEMPIK Joe
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 14(3), August 2010, pp.15-22.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article discusses the role that gardening, horticulture and farming can play in promoting mental well-being and in supporting the recovery of individuals with mental health problems. Social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) can be described as a community of vulnerable people working together on horticultural activities in a garden or allotment, with the aim of providing mutual support and benefit to their health and well-being. STH projects provide meaningful occupation in a natural setting and some prepare their clients for eventual paid employment. Importantly, STH projects also provide opportunities for social contact and experience of the natural environment. This connected with nature is considered to be an essential element in STH. The article looks at: the history of STH and horticultural therapy; evidence of its effectiveness; and current services and their funding. It argues that STH is an inexpensive way to treat and care for people with mental health problems, and that there is considerable room for expansion of service provision.

Journal article

Gardening and belonging: reflections on how social and therapeutic horticulture may facilitate health, wellbeing and inclusion

Authors:
DIAMANT Emma, WATERHOUSE Andrew
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73(2), February 2010, pp.84-88.
Publisher:
Sage

A sense of belonging is a key element in enabling social inclusion through meaningful occupations. This is evident in occupational science and social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) literature. STH is an emerging therapeutic movement using horticulture-related activities to promote the health and wellbeing of disabled and vulnerable people. How these theories interact in practice was explored at Thrive's STH project in Battersea in London. A workshop conducted with 3 Thrive Battersea's therapists examined how gardening may facilitate health and wellbeing through belonging. The article describes activities discussed by the therapists and aspects of belonging embedded in these activities. The article concludes that Thrive can be viewed as an example of inclusive practice, where a sense of belonging reduces the barriers excluding individuals from participating. The implications for occupational therapy from this rich synergy of occupational science, STH and social inclusion are considered.

Journal article

Gardening as a therapeutic intervention in mental health

Author:
PAGE Mathew
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 11.11.08, 2008, pp.28-30.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

This article describes why on low-secure unit chose to initiative a horticultural therapy project and organise it as a 'workers cooperative'. The therapeutic benefits of gardening are explored, particularly focusing on the social benefits. This article also discusses the issues of hope, which is an intrinsic requirement in gardening.

Journal article

'Gardening without Borders': reflections on the results of a survey of practitioners of an 'unstructured' profession

Authors:
FIELDHOUSE Jon, SEMPIK Joe
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70(10), October 2007, pp.449-453.
Publisher:
Sage

For several years, the social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) movement has been considering its own gradual professionalisation, as a way of raising its profile and ensuring standards of training and practice. A survey of 119 STH practitioners showed that the vast majority of respondents wanted a national body and the registration of projects and/or practitioners; over half wanted a protected job title; and there was a wish for more research-based evidence. The implications of this survey for the STH movement are discussed and issues of potential interest for occupational therapists are highlighted.

Book

Social and therapeutic horticulture: evidence and messages from research

Authors:
SEMPIK Joe, ALDRIDGE Jo, BECKER Saul
Publisher:
Thrive; University of Loughborough. Centre for Child and Family Research
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
60p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Reading

Gardening and horticulture, in many different forms, have been used as a therapy or as an adjunct to therapy in the treatment of illness and disease. They have also been used to achieve social and psychological benefits for disadvantaged individuals and communities, and have been used to promote health, physical and psychological well-being. Analysis of 131 texts presented in this review provides evidence on the outcomes and effectiveness of horticulture and gardening in a number of different therapeutic settings and with different groups of people. The review presents this evidence and draws it together to create a synthesis and a model that will help to explain the processes and outcomes. While there is clear evidence that the outcomes of social and therapeutic horticulture can be positive and multifaceted, for example, in promoting health gain, general well-being, social cohesion, employment, skills development etc. there seems little doubt that this evidence base is currently under-developed and, at times, lacking in scientific rigour. Evidence can take many forms, from the anecdotal and descriptive through to rigorous academic research. This review draws on all these forms of evidence, but as the authors argue, it is evidence from systematic and analytical research which forms the best basis for the development of understanding, policy and practice. The underlying messages from this review concern not just the outcomes of social and therapeutic horticulture but also how fertile an area this is for future research.

Book

Growing together: a practice guide to promoting social inclusion through gardening and horticulture

Authors:
SEMPIK Joe, ALDRIDGE Jo, BECKER Saul
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
66p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

The aim of the project was to identify and assess the effectiveness, benefits and limitations of horticulture and gardening as a tool for promoting social inclusion, health and well-being for vulnerable people (including those with learning difficulties, physical disabilities, mental health problems, older people, ethnic minorities and people living in disadvantaged communities). The project provided information and guidance for the development of horticultural and gardening schemes which aim to promote social inclusion and well-being.  The research also contributed to greater awareness and understanding of the circumstances, experiences and needs of socially excluded people and how gardening can contribute to their social inclusion.  The project included dissemination and training strategies aimed at raising awareness of all these issues among public, social and health care professionals and service users. The research discovered that there are nearly 1,000 therapeutic horticulture projects in the UK working with 22,000 clients each week.  This shows that there are 1,000,000 client placements a  year.

Book Full text available online for free

Social and therapeutic horticulture: the state of practice in the UK

Authors:
SEMPIK Joe, ALDRIDGE Jo, BECKER Saul
Publisher:
Loughborough University. Centre for Child and Family Research
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Loughborough

This summary describes the main findings from a survey of 836 horticulture projects for vulnerable adults in the UK carried out by Thrive in partnership with the Centre for Child and Family Research.

Journal article

Harvesting health, effects of three types of horticultural therapy activities for persons with dementia

Authors:
GIGLIOTTI Christina, JARROTT Shannon, YORGASON Jeremy
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 3(2), June 2004, pp.161-180.
Publisher:
Sage

This exploratory study investigated differential responses of persons with dementia to three types of horticultural therapy (HT) activities: cooking, crafts, and planting. HT activities were conducted three times per week at an adult day service (ADS) programme over a nine-week period. Observational data for each participant were collected during HT and more traditional ADS activities at five-minute intervals using a modified Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) technique. Predominant behaviour and affect of each timeframe were recorderded for participants. High levels of positive affect and engagement were observed during all of the categories of HT activities, but no significant differences were found between the three categories of HT activities. While levels of engagement in the presented HT and traditional activies were similar, the percentage of time spent doing nothing was lower during HT than traditional activities.

Journal article

The healing fields

Author:
GRUT Jenny
Journal article citation:
Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 24(3), Autumn 2003, p.187.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes the work of the Natural Grown Project which was set up by the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture. The project works with refugees and asylum seekers in a long term rehabilitation programme using a combination of horticulture and psychotherapy on two allotment sites and a remembrance garden. Nature is used as a source of healing and as a way of communication.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Say it with flowers

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 17.4.03, 2003, pp.44-45.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at how horticultural therapy has been helping a women with learning difficulties deal with her aggression and challenging behaviour.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to access resource links, advanced search and email alerts