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Book Full text available online for free

Inspection of services for people with physical or sensory impairments: Trafford Council: April 2007

Authors:
TALBOT Sue, et al
Publisher:
Commission for Social Care Inspection. North West
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
Manchester
Journal article Full text available online for free

Housing and disabled parents

Author:
WATES Michele
Journal article citation:
Disability, Pregnancy and Parenthood International, Summer 2005, pp.8-11.
Publisher:
National Centre for Disabled Parents

Many disabled parents face daily difficulties in meeting their child's needs because they live in housing that is not suitable to their needs. This article briefly highlights recent research and also provides personal accounts by disabled parents which underline the problems they face. The article also includes a selection of relevant organisations and resources.

Journal article

Visual impairment in childhood: insights from a community-based survey

Authors:
FLANAGAN N.M., JACKSON A.J., HILL A.E.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(6), November 2003, pp.493-499.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aimed to produce a profile of visual impairment (VI) in childhood with a view to informing future services and raise awareness of the need for comprehensive assessment including developmental remediation and educational advice, against the background that the concept of VI in childhood has changed over the last 30 years. The number of children with an isolated visual problem has decreased and the numbers with VI and coexisting neurological disability has increased. Seventy-six children with VI were identified from multiple sources including hospital and community paediatricians and statutory blind registers giving a childhood prevalence of 1.61 per 1,000. Thirty-two per cent had a normal pattern of development. Global delays/severe learning difficulty were found in 43%. Only 21% had an isolated VI. Additional medical problems were present in 79% of which cerebral palsy, occurring in 33%, was the most common. Nine per cent were classified as totally blind. Cortical visual impairment was diagnosed in 45%. Twenty-two per cent were registered blind or partially sighted. Most cases of VI in children did not appear on the statutory blind or partially sighted registers, thus these have limited value for service development. The practice implications highlight the need for early assessment and advice from a co-ordinated team to optimise visual potential in childhood.

Book

Inspection of services for people with a physical or sensory impairment in the Vale of Glamorgan Council: summary and recommendations

Author:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publisher:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff
Book

Inspection of services for people with a physical or sensory impairment in the Vale of Glamorgan Council

Author:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publisher:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
108p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff
Book

Inspection of services for people with a physical or sensory impairment in Wrexham County Borough Council:July 2001

Author:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publisher:
WALES. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
83p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff
Book

From a different viewpoint: the lives and experiences of visually impaired people

Authors:
FRENCH Sally, SWAIN John
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
80p.,list of orgs.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Workbook designed to help young people explore the lives and experiences of visually impaired people. Uses case studies and interviews and explores issues around disability in general.

Book

Towards independence: policy statement for services for physically and sensorily disabled people

Author:
LANCASHIRE. Social Services Department
Publisher:
Lancashire. Social Services Department
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
47p.,tables.
Place of publication:
Preston
Book

Door to door: a guide to transport for people with disabilities

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Transport
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
168p.,list of orgs.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Guide covering all forms of transport for both local and longer distance journeys. Provides contact points for further information. In 11 sections: getting started (including information on: benefits and allowances; equipment; and mobility for blind and partially sighted people); planning your journey; local trips; travelling in and across London; travelling further afield; cars and driving; travelling abroad; holidays; geographical directory; useful publications; and subject index.

Journal article

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder respond similarly to age-matched controls in both speed and accuracy if goal-directed movements are made across the midline

Authors:
SMITS-ENGLESMAN B. C. M., BLOEM-VAN DER WEL H. E., DUYSENS J.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), November 2006, pp.703-710.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The conventional view among many clinicians is that crossing the midline in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) results in degradation of their performance. However, no kinematic data yet exist to support this view. We therefore tested this assumption in an experimental setting.  A group of age- and gender-matched children with DCD (n = 48) and a group of typically developing children (n = 48) were compared while performing goal-directed movements with a pen on a XY-tablet. The authors examined whether speed or accuracy changed if the goal-directed movements were made towards targets positioned either at the midline, the contralateral (crossed) side or the ipsilateral (uncrossed) side of the body midline. These results showed that movements in the contralateral workspace were less accurate for both groups of children in the tested age range (6–11 years). The movements made towards the targets in the midline were the fastest, and the pen pressure for movements in the ipsilateral space was the highest. However, these effects were similar for children with and without DCD. As expected, children with DCD made more errors, were slower and pressed more erratically on their pen, but this difference was irrespective of the position of their hand in the workspace. Crossing the midline in children with DCD for small amplitude movements (2.5 cm), as tested in this study, does not result in increased degradation of the goal-directed movements compared with their typically developing peers. This implies that, contrary to expectation, there is no evidence for a preferential deficit in DCD in brain structures involved in making movements in the contralateral workspace.

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