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Journal article

Social norms and their implications for disability

Author:
MURPHY John W.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 4(1/2), 2005, pp.153-163.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This paper discusses how and why the norms for defining disability continue to change. This analysis illustrates the social nature of the disability and that changing norms continue to define the meaning of disability. The paper is grounded in a postmodern perspective, a notion that has only entered the field of disability in the 21st century. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Presage of a paradigm shift?: beyond the social model of disability toward resistance theories of disability

Authors:
GABEL Susan, PETERS Susan
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(6), October 2004, pp.585-600.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Over the last decade, a growing number of scholars in Disability Studies have begun to critique the social model of disability. This paper documents the movement in these critiques, analyzing several ways paradigms and theories have been used in relation to the social model and the ways in which resistance plays a part in these paradigms. In the second part of the paper, we begin to explore the implications of resistance theory for disability theory, noting that resistance appears to exist throughout all paradigms at play in disability studies while it is rarely explicitly addressed. The authors conclude by describing the potential use of resistance theory for both theory and praxis.

Journal article

The use and abuse of models of disability

Authors:
LLEWELLYN A., HOGAN K.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(1), January 2000, pp.157-165.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Throughout history, theorists have made use of the technology of the day to provide explanatory models of the behaviour they observe in order to provide an improved understanding of human behaviour. This article shows that models do have their place within disability research and discusses the implications of using the medical and social models of disability, together with two models from development psychology, namely the transactional model and systems theory, will be discussed. Argues that the usage of these models can aid understanding of disability in both research and clinical settings.

Journal article

The 'normal' and the monstrous in disability research

Author:
CLEAR Mike
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(4), July 1999, pp.435-448.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article contributes to the ongoing discussion of doing and writing disability research by revisiting research as politics, exposing the meeting point of modern and post-modern approaches, and proposing a stronger materiality, and reintegration of theory and practice. The implications are that a personalised approach is needed to explore critically across disciplinary boundaries, beyond unilateral discourse into assumed knowledge. Discusses some key approaches, which when taken together support critical exploration.

Journal article

Writing disability history: problems perspectives and sources

Author:
BREDBERG Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(2), March 1999, pp.189-201.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper presents a critique of the uses of history that currently predominate within disability studies and also offers suggestions for ways in which disability history may be made more relevant to the emancipatory role of the discipline, more rigorous and more complete.

Journal article

Disability and social work: applications from poststructuralism, postmodernism and feminism

Author:
FAWCETT Barbara
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 28(2), April 1998, pp.263-277.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Argues that poststructural and postmodern perspectives have something useful to offer social work, provided these orientations are informed by the 'social critical power of feminism'. A case study is used to consider the utility of applying feminist poststructural and postmodern perspectives. It is contended that these orientations not only serve to link practice to theory in a different way and to open up new avenues for exploration, but can also be seen to make a contribution to the current debate about the current constitution of social work.

Journal article

Constructions and creations: idealism, materialism and disability theory

Author:
PRIESTLEY Mark
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 13(1), February 1998, pp.75-94.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article suggests that a proper understanding of disability theory requires more than a distinction between individual and social model approaches. It is also helpful to distinguish between materialist and idealist explanations. These two dimensions are used to generate a four-fold typology which highlights important differences between the main approaches. Social model approaches are examined in more detail and the article concludes that although social constructionist accounts have been useful they do not provide a sufficient level of explanation.

Journal article

Children's experiences of disability: pointers to a social model of childhood disability

Authors:
CONNORS Clare, STALKER Kirsten
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 22(1), January 2007, pp.19-33.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The social model of disability has paid little attention to disabled children, with few attempts to explore how far it provides an adequate explanatory framework for their experiences. This paper reports findings from a two-year study exploring the lived experiences of 26 disabled children aged 7-15. They experienced disability in four ways - in terms of impairment, difference, other people's behaviour towards them, and material barriers. Most young people presented themselves as similar to non-disabled children: it is suggested they may have lacked a positive language with which to discuss difference. It is further argued that Thomas's (1999) social relational model of disability can help inform understandings of children's experiences, with 'barriers to being' having particular significance.

Journal article

How is disability understood?: an examination of sociological approaches

Author:
THOMAS Carol
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(6), October 2004, pp.569-583.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper considers sociological understandings of what constitutes disability. Current meanings of disability in both disability studies and medical sociology are examined and compared, using selected articles from leading authors in each discipline as case studies. These disciplines are often represented as offering starkly contrasting approaches to disability, with their differences amounting to a disciplinary 'divide'. It is argued that, on closer inspection, common ground can be found between some writers in disability studies and medical sociology. It is suggested that this situation has arisen because, in disability studies, the social relational understanding of disability developed by Vic Finkelstein and Paul Hunt in the 1970s has been lost over time, overshadowed by the rise to prominence of its offspring: the social model of disability. The paper concludes with some reflections on the need to revive a social relational understanding of disability.

Book

Disability issues for social workers and human services professionals in the twenty-first century

Editors:
MURPHY John W., PARDECK John T., (eds.)
Publisher:
Haworth Social Work Practice Press
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
174p.
Place of publication:
Binghamton, NY

This text provides authoritative information that will prove to be of critical importance for disability professionals in the coming years. It covers aspects of disability that have not been well covered in the literature—issues surrounding spirituality, civil rights, and the “medical model vs. social (or minority) model” (of viewing disability) controversy. It examines the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act in the wake of the Supreme Court’s narrowing of the Act’s powers and explore newly developed theories designed to more accurately define the true meaning of disability.

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