Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"physical disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 95

Journal article

Side by side

Author:
CROSS Merry
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 20.1.94, 1994, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at difficulties in a working relationship that can arise between child protection workers and disability professionals. The main problems result from a power imbalance, ignorance of each others' specialisms and the consequences of society's marginalisation of disability. Suggests co-training as a answer to breaking down the barriers. Looks at what can be gained from such training.

Journal article

Reforming community care - a perspective from New Zealand

Author:
WATSON Paul
Journal article citation:
Local Government Studies, 20(3), Autumn 1994, pp.374-378.
Publisher:
Routledge

Looks at the experience of New Zealand in managing community care, in particular disability support services.

Book

Children first: working with children and disability

Author:
MIDDLETON Laura
Publisher:
Venture Press/British Association of Social Workers
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
135p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Aims to demystify and remove the fear from working with disability and translate the philosophy of the Children Act 1989 into practice. Provides a guide to all legislation affecting disabled children, including the Disabled Persons Act 1986 and the Education Reform Act 1988. Alerts professionals to the risk of abuse of disabled children. Explores the needs of parents and relates current social theories of disabilities to attitudes adopted towards children.

Journal article

Disability in the family: a case for reworking our commitments

Author:
DEWEES Marty
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 3(1), 2004, pp.3-20.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This American article describes a vision for reworking social work's frequently marginal commitment to disability work. Through the lens of an interdisciplinary Maternal Child Health project for children with neurodisabilities and their families, it advocates for several shifts in the profession's commitments. These include a heightened focus on disability practice, a non-pathologizing family-centered approach, the integration of direct and indirect social work methods, and the membership of social workers in interdisciplinary teaming efforts designed to work with families who have children with disabilities. The paper also describes an interdisciplinary project opportunity for students, educators, and practitioners to renew their commitment to families who have children with disabilities in the current practice context and suggests some strategies for generalization to all social work students. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Book Full text available online for free

Children's experiences of disability: a positive outlook

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Education Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
16p.
Journal article

Socialtj"nsten och omgivningen. (The Social Services and Society at large.)

Author:
BOKLUND Ann
Journal article citation:
Nordisk Sosialt Arbeid, 13(3), 1993, pp.24-40.
Publisher:
Universitetsforlaget AS

The Swedish Social Service Act was introduced in 1982. The intentions of the legislators are expressed in the preparatory work on the Act. The three programmes - Care for the Aged & Disabled (CAD), Daycare for children (DCC), and the Personal Social Services (PSS) - should cooperate and the organization of the Social Services should be coordinated and integrated. In this article the organization of these programmes under the same Social Services Municipal Committee and managerial staff is analysed from a specific organizational theoretical viewpoint. The analysis shows that each of the Social Service's three programmes can be regarded as a separate one, each with its own way of reacting and responding to changes, influences and demands of society at large.

Journal article

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Shangri‐La: foreshadowing the Independent Living Movement in Warm Springs, Georgia, 1926–1945

Author:
HOLLAND Daniel
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 21(5), August 2006, pp.513-535.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is well known to have disguised and minimized his disability in his role as a political leader. Less well known is the remarkable nature of the colony he established for people with disabilities from polio in Warm Springs, Georgia in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. The colony at Warm Springs represents a unique historical community in which disability was not stigmatized; where people with disabilities controlled their own resources and their own lives; and where the medical model of disability was repudiated. As such, the Warm Springs community represents a remarkable period and place in disability history that warrants continued study. New evidence drawn from the archives of the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation, the FDR Presidential Library in Hyde Park, New York and the personal scrapbooks of former residents of the Warm Springs colony provides further support for the theory that FDR’s Warm Springs colony represented an early precursor to the philosophies and values promoted by the Independent Living Movement that emerged 50 years later. The Warm Springs colony offered an unprecedented approach to rehabilitation and independent living for people with disabilities from polio in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, and because of this provides an invaluable lesson from history that deserves ongoing attention.

Journal article

The international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF), a new tool for social workers

Author:
BARROW Frederica H.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 5(1), 2006, pp.65-73.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The World Health Organization (WHO) ratified the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in 2001. This followed a ten year period of international development which shifted emphasis from a system concerned with the consequences of disease to a system concerned with human functionality and health. Disability advocates contributed to this system which has potential as a tool for social work classification and assessment. In this article, background information is provided, the system is briefly described, and guidance is offered regarding training options as a way of introducing it as a new assessment tool for social workers. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Book

Social work with young people in care: looking after children in theory and practice

Author:
THOMAS Nigel
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
212p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

This text offers an introduction to social work with children and young people who are looked after away from home. The book explains the context in which children are looked after, the range of services available, and the research evidence, laying the groundwork for developing good practice skills. It emphasises the importance of listening to children and to issues of disability and ethnicity.

Journal article

Disabled children and their families in Ukraine: health and mental health issues for families caring for their disabled child at home

Author:
BRIDGE Gillian
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Health Care, 39(1/2), 2004, pp.89-105.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In the Eastern European countries included in the communist system of the USSR, parents of disabled children were encouraged to commit their disabled child to institutional care. There were strict legal regulations excluding them from schools. Medical assessments were used for care decisions. Nevertheless many parents decided to care for their disabled child at home within the family. Ukraine became an independent country in 1991, when communism was replaced by liberal democracy within a free market system. Western solutions have been sought for many social problems existing, but 'hidden,' under the old regime. For more of the parents of disabled children, this has meant embracing ideas of caring for their disabled children in the community, and providing for their social, educational, and medical needs, which have previously been denied. The issue of disability is a serious one for Ukraine where the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in 1986 caused extensive radiation poisoning. This almost certainly led to an increase in the number of disabled children being born and an increase in the incidence of various forms of cancer. This paper is based on a series of observation visits to some of the many self-help groups established by parents, usually mothers, for their disabled children. It draws attention to the emotional stress experienced both by parents and their disabled children in the process of attempting to come to terms with the disabling conditions, and the denial of the normal rights of childhood resulting from prejudice, poor resources, ignorance, and restrictive legislation. Attempts have been made to identify the possible role and tasks of professional social workers within this context. International comparisons show that many parents and their children do not benefit from the medical model of disability, and that serious consequences include the development of depressive illness among those who find that little help is available from public services. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts