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Journal article

People into Employment: supporting people with disabilities and carers into work

Author:
ARKSEY Hilary
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(3), May 2003, pp.283-292.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Carers and people with disabilities are disadvantaged groups at risk of social exclusion. Work is an important route to inclusion, but carers and people with disabilities are under-represented in the workforce. Reports key findings from a new study that evaluated People into Employment (PIE), a pilot employment project in north-east England designed to support people with disabilities, carers and former carers in gaining mainstream work, aiming to identify what clients, partner agencies and employers perceived to be PIE's most important services, its strengths and areas where there was scope for further development. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected at the mid-point and at the end of the project through 2 questionnaire surveys and interviews with clients, the project development officer, partner agencies and employers. Drawing on the 'pathway model', the findings show that PIE's interventions included mobilising, matching, mediating and supporting activities. Key ingredients of success include: tailor-made job-search activities and training; adjusting the pace at which people move towards sustained employment; recognising and responding to the differing needs of people with disabilities, carers and former carers; confidence boosting; accompanying clients to job interviews; good job matching; and ongoing practical and emotional support for both clients and employers. Rudimentary calculations suggest that the cost per job to the project is less than the cost per job for large national projects. Overall, these findings illustrate how access to employment via flexible job-search services geared up to the local labour market can successfully promote social inclusion for carers and people with disabilities.

Book Full text available online for free

A small matter of equality: living with restricted growth

Authors:
SHAKESPEARE Tom, WRIGHT Michael, THOMPSON Sue
Publisher:
Restricted Growth Association
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
Yeovil

Adults with restricted growth, or dwarfism, are far more disabled by social barriers and by medical problems than has previously been realised, according to this report. A team of researchers at Newcastle University, led by sociologist Dr Tom Shakespeare and geneticist Dr Michael Wright, conducted the three-year study, which was managed by the Restricted Growth Association. The study is the largest research project of its kind to have been carried out into the quality of life of adults affected by conditions that cause restricted growth. Restricted Growth affects approximately one in 10,000 births each year. Some 75 per cent of individuals born with restricted growth conditions are born to two parents of average height. One of the key findings of the study was that almost all restricted growth people suffer unwanted public attention. Some 97 per cent of respondents said they have experienced name calling, while others cited problems with abuse including mockery, and sometimes even physical violence.

Book Full text available online for free

What works and looking ahead: UK policies and practices facilitating employment of disabled people

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
67p.
Place of publication:
York

There is unprecedented policy commitment to raise the employment level of disabled people, as part of a wider strategy to tackle poverty, social exclusion, discrimination and welfare dependency. Government is committed to evidence-based policy making, and this paper brings together detailed evidence from robust and high quality research on ‘what works’.

Journal article

Disability, work, and welfare: challenging the social exclusion of disabled people

Authors:
BARNES Colin, MERCER Geof
Journal article citation:
Work Employment and Society, 19(3), September 2005, pp.527-545.
Publisher:
Sage

This article engages with debates relating to social policy and disabled people’s exclusion from the British labour market. Drawing on recent developments from within the disabled people’s movement, in particular, the concept of independent living and the social model of disability, and the associated disability studies literature, a critical evaluation of orthodox sociological theories of work, unemployment, and under-employment in relation to disabled people’s exclusion from the workplace is provided. It is argued that analyses of work and disability have failed to address in sufficient depth or breadth the various social and environmental barriers that confront disabled people. It is suggested that a reconfiguration of the meaning of work for disabled people - drawing on and commensurate with disabled people’s perspectives as expressed by the philosophy of independent living - and a social model analysis of their oppression is needed and long overdue.

Journal article

Understanding emerging disabilities

Authors:
FOX Michael H., KIM Kyung Mee
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(4), June 2004, pp.323-337.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This research seeks to understand social and environmental characteristics that distinguish emerging from traditional disability populations. The authors qualitatively analysed how emerging disabilities are understood by persons with disabilities, and used these themes with a public use data source to analyse differences between emerging and traditional disabilities. Findings first illustrate the difficulty in diagnosing and categorizing emerging disabilities. This is true for both persons who have these conditions and medical personnel who are expected to interpret them. Compared with persons with traditional disabilities, persons with emerging disabilities had less education, greater difficulties with activities of daily living, lower income, less private insurance, more frequent medical care and were less likely to work. The picture emerges of that of an underclass within society. There is an ongoing need for a referral and support system with greater recognition and acceptance of all disabilities, especially within independent living centers and among employers.

Book

That kind of life: social exclusion and young disabled people with high levels of support needs

Author:
MORRIS Jenny,
Publisher:
SCOPE
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
49p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report is concerned with the experiences of a group of children and young people who are at a high risk of social exclusion. It is based on the experiences of forty four young people aged between fifteen and twenty, all of whom have high levels of support needs.

Journal article

Play and opportunity for disabled children

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Childright, 172, December 2000, p.11.
Publisher:
Children's Legal Centre

Presents some of the key points from the recent publication, 'Side by Side', which looks at the inclusion and participation of disabled children in play environments.

Journal article

Report exposes the same old attitudes

Author:
WINCHESTER Ruth
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.7.00, 2000, p.11.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on how views of disabled people are proving to be resistant to change despite government campaigns.

Journal article

Disablement in the informational age

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(4), June 2000, pp.619-636.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper article employment data from the USA and UK on the process of informationalisation, in order to ascertain if it is having a particular impact on the construction of disablement. It finds that disabled people are more likely to be excluded from employment in the informational sector and that the current reforms of welfare may remove some of the safety net provision that have been part of the hegemony of care established under industrialisation. It concludes by suggesting that social exclusion, which removes the notion of deservingness, may replace disability as a social process in the twenty-first century.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 2000, 2000, pp.8-10.
Publisher:
Community Care

Direct payments are designed to allow disabled people to purchase their own services, so that they themselves can tailor their care to their needs. But recent research suggests that the payments have had mixed results in helping them to escape the cycle of social exclusion.

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