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Journal article

On the shoulders of children

Author:
COOMBES Rebecca
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 12.7.01, 2001, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

There are about 32,000 young carers in the UK. Looks at how a school nurse is helping one of them to cope.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Parents' exclusion zone

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 28.04.05, 2005, pp.50-51.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on the case of two parents with disabilities who want their able-bodied daughter to go to a local school. However the school is over subscribed, it has inaccessible buildings and all school information is available only in written form.

Journal article

Children with a tracheostomy: experience of their carers in school

Authors:
SMITH J.C., WILLIAMS J., GIBBIN K.P.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(4), July 2003, pp.291-296.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aimed to identify children with a tracheostomy in Nottinghamshire schools and determine their supportt, given that tracheostomies are increasingly performed for chronic medical conditions and there are no published studies reporting school experience. Such information would be valuable in planning care and education. Used a questionnaire survey to families and school carers of 11 such children. All children of school age were in full-time education (5 mainstream, 5 special schools). One preschool child attended a family centre. Four had problems finding suitable carers, delaying return to school in 3. Four parents were dissatisfied with aspects of the child's experience at school: 2 felt teaching staff were unsupportive, one was unhappy with the care of the tracheostomy, and one had problems funding a carer. Ten out of 11 school carers were satisfied with their training; 10 would have liked regular update sessions. The amount of care required varied. Those with complex medical problems in a special school setting needed frequent care, and one had required admission to hospital from school. One child had time off school because of lack of carer availability. The severely disabled had less time off school for ill health after the tracheostomy than before. Concludes that children with tracheostomies can successfully and safely achieve full-time education in both mainstream and special schools. A dedicated multidisciplinary team, including parental input, is essential. Regular revision of skills and information sessions for teaching staff would be beneficial.

Book Full text available online for free

The school lives of children and young people with a spinal cord injury

Authors:
KNIGHT Abigail, et al
Publisher:
University of London. Institute of Education. Thomas Coram Research Unit
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
87p.
Place of publication:
London

This research study was carried out by the Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London, between January and July 2008. The study was funded by The Back-Up Trust, an organisation working with spinally injured adults and children, as part of their Schools Project. The main purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of children and young people with a SCI in mainstream school. This was to inform The Back-Up Trust’s Schools Project, which has the aim of improving the quality of school provision for children with a spinal cord injury. The study asked young people, parents and carers about their positive and negative experiences. It also aimed to investigate schools’ experiences of working with young people with a SCI and the challenges and factors that help them work effectively with children with a SCI.

Journal article

Sharing the world: the researcher and the researched

Author:
SHAH Sonali
Journal article citation:
Qualitative Research, 6(2), May 2006, pp.207-220.
Publisher:
Sage

This article explores the methodological opportunities and challenges encountered, as a disabled researcher, while doing research on the educational experiences and career aspirations of a group of young disabled people, still in full-time mainstream or special education. While the key barriers facing disabled researchers are recognized, they are challenged in this article and rather seen as opportunities. Further, they are diluted by the ontological privileges that are at the disposal of the disabled researcher, including the use of empathy, which provides a way of understanding other people's experiences in the context of both similarities and differences between the researcher and the researched. This article focuses on three methods of qualitative enquiry – namely, classroom observation, forum theatre workshops and individual interviews. It explores how they were employed to ensure the voices of young disabled people were captured by the research process in ways that reflect their views and recognize them as active social agents who are able to make decisions about their own futures.

Book

Students with disabilities, learning difficulties and disadvantages: statistics and indicators

Author:
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation
Publisher:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
150p.
Place of publication:
Paris
Book Full text available online for free

Inclusion of disabled children in primary school playgrounds

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

In  recent years the trend has been to educate disabled children in mainstream schools, partly as a response to the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (2001). One of the themes of Every Child Matters (2004) is that children should enjoy and achieve, and this applies to the educational context. Based on qualitative research focusing on disabled children, this study investigated the play in playgrounds of six schools in Yorkshire. It reveals how disabled children were included in play and identifies both organisational, social and physical barriers and good practice to the inclusion of these children in play at both playtimes and lunch-times.

Journal article

Practising group work: a processual account

Authors:
SUKHRAMANI Neelam, BAIG Mohammad Imran
Journal article citation:
Indian Journal of Social Work, 64(1), January 2003, pp.1-32.
Publisher:
Tata Institute of Social Sciences

Group work has been vastly practised, but minimally documented method in the Indian context. This article is an attempt to narrate, as well as to use a theoretical framework to analyse the experiences of working with a group in an integrated school of children with and without physical disabilities. Efforts have been made to detail out each phase by delving into the nature of activities undertaken, the involvement that it elicited from the members, the group dynamics and the role played by the group worker. The article aims to provide a practitioner or a would-be practitioner an account of group work process.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Caring after hours

Author:
WHEATLEY Helen
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 01.09.05, 2005, pp.38-39.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Extended schools could provide a vehicle for tackling inequalities and helping parents back to work and disabled children would benefit from inclusive leisure activities. However, questions remain over how extended services will be staffed, and whether other specialist services will lose out.  The article argues that extended school services need to be attractive and flexible enough for all children.

Journal article

Special status

Author:
BENNETT Anita
Journal article citation:
Young Minds Magazine, 75, March 2005, pp.14-16.
Publisher:
YoungMinds

Investigates the risk to special schools in the drive for inclusion for children with disabilities. A battle is being waged to save schools for children with mental disabilities. The ideology that all children, whatever their special needs, and especially as they reach secondary level, should be educated in mainstream schools is being questioned.

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