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Personal safety

Author:
SCOPE
Publisher:
SCOPE
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

Personal safety for physically disabled people is about recognising possible dangers and knowing what steps can  be taken to stay safe.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Making headway

Authors:
GEORGE Mike, NEEDHAM Carol
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 14.6.01, May 2001, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

There are few services provided for people with brain injuries with the result that too much pressure is placed on their carers. Talks to a social worker about the difficulties she had in obtaining support for her client and his carer.

Journal article

Seeing sense

Author:
GEORGE Mike
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 15.6.00, 2000, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A social worker explains how she intervened to help her visually impaired client when his employer what him to retire.

Journal article

Sexual victimization of youth with a physical disability: an examination of prevalence rates, and risk and protective factors

Authors:
MUELLER-JOHNSON Katrin, EISNER Manuel P., OBSUTH Ingrid
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(17), 2014, pp.3180-3206.
Publisher:
Sage

Children with disabilities have been shown to be at greater risk of victimisation than those without. This study used data from a national school-based survey of adolescents (n = 6,749, mean age = 15.41, SD = .66) in Switzerland to investigate sexual victimisation (SV) among physically disabled youth. Two subtypes of SV were differentiated: contact SV, including penetration or touching/kissing, and non-contact SV, such as exhibitionism, verbal harassment, exposure to sexual acts, or cyber SV. A total of 360 (5.1%) youth self-identified as having a physical disability. Lifetime prevalence rates for contact SV were 25.95% for girls with a physical disability (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29 compared with able-bodied girls), 18.50% for boys with physical disability (OR = 2.78 compared with able-bodied boys), and 22.35% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.74 compared with able-bodied youth). For non-contact SV, the lifetime prevalence was 48.11% for girls with a physical disability (OR = 1.44 compared with able-bodied girls), 31.76% for boys with physical disability (OR = 1.95 compared with able-bodied boys), and 40.28% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.67 compared with able-bodied youth). After controlling for other risk factors, physical disability was a significant predictor of contact and non-contact SV for boys, but not for girls. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Examining the impact of disability status on intimate partner violence victimization in a population sample

Authors:
HAHN Josephine W., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(17), 2014, pp.3063-3085.
Publisher:
Sage

This study examined effects of impairments in physical and mental health on the risk of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (18 years. A total of 34,563 adults completed interviews in two waves of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Physical and mental health impairments, as well as IPV victimization, were assessed using validated surveys in the total sample and by gender. In the total sample, physical health impairments at Wave 1 and mental health impairments at Wave 1 were significantly associated with higher risk of IPV victimization at Wave 2, compared with those without reported impairments. Higher risk of later IPV victimization was also seen among females who reported physical health impairments and mental health impairments compared with those who did not report similar limitations. Among males, higher risk of IPV victimization was significantly associated with mental health impairments, compared with those without mental health impairments. Adults with physical and mental health impairments may benefit from targeted interventions aimed at preventing IPV. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

An evaluation of recovery factors for foster care alumni with physical or psychiatric impairments: predictors of psychological outcomes

Authors:
ANCTIL Tina M., et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 29(8), August 2007, pp.1021-1034.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This study fills a gap in the existing literature by exploring developmentally appropriate services that have the potential to improve psychological outcomes across the lifetime for children and adolescents with physical and/or psychiatric impairments in foster care. With an American national sample of adults (N = 564) who were previously in foster care (i.e., alumni) and diagnosed with a physical or mental impairment, this investigation assessed the long-term psychological effects of risk factors associated with being in foster care. By focusing on the recovery process within the resilience framework, the investigation addressed the impact of risk and protective factors on self-esteem, overall mental health, and the number of psychiatric diagnoses in foster care. Multiple regression results indicate that living with foster parents that were perceived as helpful and receiving mental health services were significant for self-esteem outcomes. Having unstable foster care placements was associated with a greater likelihood of mental health diagnoses persisting into adulthood. Most notably, when evaluating the long-term effect of specific risk factors associated with foster care (e.g., child abuse and neglect and placement experiences), alongside services designed to enhance and develop protective factors, the risk factors' effect was negligible on adult psychological outcomes.

Journal article

Early identification: are speech/language-impaired toddlers at increased risk for Developmental Coordination Disorder?

Authors:
GAINES R., MISSIUNA C.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(3), May 2007, pp.325-332.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a movement skill disorder which impacts upon a child’s ability to perform age-appropriate self-care and academic tasks. DCD is commonly comorbid with speech/language learning disabilities. The present study was conducted to determine whether children who had been identified with speech/language delays as toddlers demonstrated characteristics of DCD and/or speech/language problems at kindergarten age. Speech/language and motor assessments who were followed up at 63–80 months of age. Of the 40 children, 18 showed evidence of significant motor impairment and two-thirds of these met diagnostic criteria for DCD at follow-up. Twelve children were identified as having persistent speech/language problems and, of these, nine presented with significant motor co-ordination difficulties. Parental report of gross motor and fine motor problems at follow-up correlated highly with actual motor impairment scores. Young children who are in early intervention programmes for speech/language delays may have significant co-ordination difficulties that will become more evident at kindergarten age when motor deficits begin to impact self-care and academic tasks. Clinical implications for early recognition of motor issues by speech/language pathologists and the potential use of parental reporting tools are addressed.

Book Full text available online for free

Experiences of the job retention and rehabilitation pilot

Authors:
FARRELL Christopher, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
208p.
Place of publication:
London

The Job Retention and Rehabilitation pilot is testing ways of supporting the employment of people on sick leave at risk of leaving employment. It is a joint DWP and Department of Health initiative. The pilot is being carried out in six geographical areas and commenced in April 2003. The evaluation is being carried out in collaboration with the National Centre for Social Research and consists of a large programme of quantitative and qualitative research including the first major use of random assignment techniques in the UK. SPRU's input will be mainly in the qualitative elements of the research design. The aim of the pilots is to test methods to help people who have been out of work because of sickness or disability for between six and 26 weeks to return to employment as soon as possible.

Book Full text available online for free

Impacts of the job retention and rehabilitation pilot

Authors:
PURDON Susan, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
172p.
Place of publication:
London

The Job Retention and Rehabilitation Pilot (JRRP) was undertaken to test out boosting the usual help for those off work due to sickness and ill health, to return to and retain their job. The report presents information about the experience of participating in the trial, and the second report provides a quantitative assessment of the impacts of the trial on return-to-work rates, health, and other measures. Key findings of the impact assessment were that this particular method of recruiting and assisting people to retain employment was not effective, the interventions had no significant impact on the group of people recruited into the trial across key return-to-work measures. Similar rates of return to work were observed in the intervention groups as in the control group. There were however some minor impacts, both positive and negative, on certain subgroups: specifically, improved return-to-work rates for those off work because of an injury; and lower return-to-work rates for those with mental health issues.

Journal article

The impact of involuntary job loss on those disabled by society: a pilot study to encourage effective participation

Authors:
BRADLEY E. J., et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(3), May 2004, pp.245-258.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Over half of the people who become disabled whilst employed are thought to be pressured into leaving their job. This study investigates the experience of involuntary retirement/redundancy due to disability. Three researchers who had all experienced such involuntary job loss were trained to conduct the research. Semi-structured interviews were designed and conducted by disabled researchers. The training of the researchers enabled them to successfully conduct a research project. The results of the project show the impact of involuntary job loss due to disability to be considerable. This study would suggest that government reforms to create new opportunities for disabled people of a working age are well overdue. Although there were some problems experienced with the amount of training required and the lack of objectivity, training disabled researchers to conduct research proved to be a valuable experience for both the researchers and the facilitators.

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