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Journal article

Parents caring for adult children with physical disabilities: the impact of hope and closeness on caregiving benefits

Authors:
SCHWARTZ Chaya, HADAR Lilit
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 88(2), April 2007, pp.273-281.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

In the present study, the authors examined 82 parents of adult children with physical disabilities from Israel. The parents described the benefits of caregiving, and reported positive feelings about their involvement in caregiving as well as a sense of personal growth as a result of caregiving. When parents perceived caregiving as causing less emotional strain (subjective burden), and when they felt higher levels of closeness with their offspring, and expressed higher levels of hope, they were more likely to indicate that caregiving yielded benefits. In the discussion, the authors focus on the importance of developing closeness and hope among parents who care for their adult offspring with physical disabilities. The implications of this conclusion for social work intervention are also discussed.

Book

It isn't fair: siblings of children with disabilities

Editors:
KLEIN Stanley, SCHLEIFER Maxwell J.
Publisher:
Bergin and Garvey
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
192p.
Place of publication:
Westport, CT

Compilation of articles from The Exceptional Parent magazine over the last decade.

Journal article

A phenomenological investigation into the impact of parenthood: Giving a voice to mothers with visual impairment in the United Kingdom

Author:
MOLDEN Helen
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 32(2), 2014, pp.136-147.
Publisher:
Sage

Despite psychological support for parents increasing in prominence in recent UK public policy, there has been a minimal focus on parenting with a disability and specifically scant information on the experiences of what it is like to be a parent with visual impairment. Nine UK mothers, aged 32–47 years, each with a child under 10, were interviewed by telephone to examine how the experience of becoming a parent impacted them. Interview transcripts were examined using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). This article focuses on two meta-themes in the findings: (1) ‘struggles around independence’ and (2) ‘visibility and the impact of the other’s gaze’. They raise issues around both theory and practice of interest to those working in psychological services for people with visual impairment, including (1) the possibility of a new integrative model to conceptualise the experience of parenting with a disability and (2) the mothers’ daily experience of stigmatisation and marginalisation in interaction with the other. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Siblings: coming unstuck and putting back the pieces

Author:
STROHM Kate
Publisher:
David Fulton
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
220p.
Place of publication:
London

The siblings of children with special needs are often the overlooked ones in families struggling to cope. The author is an experienced health professional and journalist who has a sister with cerebral palsy. In this book she shares the story of her journey from confusion and distress to understanding and acceptance. She provides a forum for other siblings to describe their own journeys. She also provides strategies that siblings themselves, parents and practitioners can use to support the brothers and sisters of children with special needs.

Journal article

‘Chocolate … makes you autism’: impairment, disability and childhood identities

Author:
KELLY Bernie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(3), May 2005, pp.261-275.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper discusses perceptions and experiences of impairment and disability from the perspectives of learning disabled children, their parents and their social workers. The author reports on findings from her doctoral study that adults often fail to take into account the views and experiences of learning disabled children. As a result, these children developed their own interpretations of impairment and disability based on their experiences and interactions with others. Whilst this indicates that they are active social interpreters, it also suggests that adults should make greater efforts to inform and consult learning disabled children. The author concludes by reflecting on the relevance of these findings to contemporary theories of disability and childhood.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled parents: examining research assumptions

Authors:
OLSEN Richard, WATES Michele
Publisher:
Research in Practice
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
70p.,bibliog
Place of publication:
Dartington

This review identifies and reviews the existing research on disabled parents and 'young carers' outlining three perspectives: personal, ecological, and organisational. It addresses new directions that could be taken in terms of good and supportive practice. It places this within the legislative, policy and practice context. review. Although it is crucial to the welfare of children that all parents are well supported, much evidence has emerged over the past decade pointing to the fact that it is very hard for parents with chronic illnesses, physical and/or sensory impairments, Deaf parents, those with learning difficulties, those with particular mental health needs and those with drug or alcohol related issues, to access information, resources and support to help them fulfil their parenting responsibilities. This has had serious implications for the welfare of large numbers of families. These groups of parents are collectively described in this review as disabled parents.

Book

Supporting parents: messages from research

Author:
QUINTON David
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
271p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This book explores the range of supports that parents find effective and how those supports might be improved or better mobilized. It draws from studies on the general population as well as specific service users, to highlight issues common to parents in a wide variety of circumstances.

Book

Bigger than the sky: disabled women on parenting

Editors:
WATES Michele, JADE Rowen
Publisher:
Women's Press
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
202p.
Place of publication:
London

This anthology challenges rigid, limiting views of what it means to be a disabled woman, and of what a parent is and does. Disabled women describe having to fight for the right to become pregnant, the pleasure of teaching children the benefits of having a "different" mother; and the delight of involving themselves in a child's life. Whether it be a birth mother, an adoptive parent, a godparent, a friend, or a woman who has made a positive choice not to become a parent, these disabled women are asserting their right to explore the diversity of experience.

Journal article

'It's more of a production': accomplishing mothering using a mobility device

Authors:
McKEEVER Patricia, et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 18(2), March 2003, pp.179-197.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This qualitative study investigated the conditions and experiences of mothers who used wheelchairs and scooters for full-time mobility. In focused, open-ended interviews, 11 mothers of children aged 6 months to 18 years described sociospatial obstacles and facilitators that influenced how they cared for their children and homes. Results suggest that mothering with a disability consists of embodied and emplaced practices. Women often felt 'out of place' as mothers given the relationship between mothering discourse and mobility devices. Furthermore, the embeddedness of mothering in place meant that the social and material conditions of place served not only as antecedents to mothering challenges, but also structured possible solutions.

Journal article

The experience of disability from the perspective of parents of children with profound impairment: is it time for an alternative model of disability?

Author:
BRETT Jane
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 17(7), December 2002, pp.825-843.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article considers the significance of a model of disability in relation to the child with profound impairment and examines the individual and social models of disability in connection with this. It is argued that although these two models cannot be completely dismissed, the models largely ignore the experience and perspective of the profoundly impaired child, their parent(s) and family. This article endeavours to inform an alternative model of disability, the 'Alliance' or cooperative model between child, parent and carer.

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