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Journal article

Validation of the measure of processes of care for use when there is no child development centre

Authors:
McCONACHIE H., LOGAN S.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(1), January 2003, pp.35-45.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Clinical governance requires measurement of health care outcomes. The Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC) is a postal questionnaire developed in Canada to reflect parents’ perceptions of the quality of services received. Examines the MPOC's usefulness for service evaluation for children with disabilities and their families. The MPOC was revised minimally for British idiom, taking out explicit references to a ‘Centre’. Surveys of parents using child disability services were carried out in 3 rural and 2 urban communities, where there are no child development centres, with a total of 495 analysable questionnaires returned. In addition, 32 parents using a home nursing service for children with multiple disabilities completed questionnaires. The return rate ranged from 49% to 67%. Factor analysis confirmed a 5-factor solution but only one factor mapped clearly onto the Canadian structure. Using the revised structure, the surveys provide evidence of the discriminating potential of the MPOC, comparing the perceptions of parents who do or do not have a care co-ordinator, and comparing recipients of a home nursing service with matched users of general services. The MPOC can be used as a measure of outcome for child disability services of differing organisational structures.

Book

Outcomes in social care practice: outcomes in community care practice; number seven

Editors:
QURESHI Hazel, (ed.)
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
213p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

The final report of a research project investigating practical ways in which a focus on the results of services could be used to improve social care for older people and disabled people. It describes five practical projects, each investigating a different approach to improving services through a focus on outcomes. Each project was undertaken by a social services department working jointly with SPRU.

Book Full text available online for free

Outcomes for disabled service users

Authors:
HARRIS Jennifer, et al
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
90p.
Place of publication:
York

Social service provision to younger disabled people is not often at the forefront of policy debate. However, the Government recognises the distinct contribution that disabled people make to the economy and the waste of potential that ensues when key services do not assist them. Often the type of assistance that younger disabled people require needs to be more flexible, or of a different type, than that offered by social services. For example, people may require assistance with making decisions concerning work, both paid and voluntary, or in parenting. This study explored ways of incorporating these and other types of assistance into assessment processes. In the study these were called ‘outcomes’ and they were incorporated into new assessment documents for use by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals.

Book Full text available online for free

Desirable outcomes of of WORKSTEP: user and provider views

Authors:
MEAH Angela, THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
110p.
Place of publication:
London

In this report disabled people said it was important to set themselves goals and experience achieving them. Achieving things through their jobs, they said, encouraged them to set goals outside work, like learning to travel independently or to drive. Going to work gave disabled people the chance to meet new people and make friends. This was especially important to people with learning disabilities who complained of feeling bored when ‘stuck at home’. The routine of work was important to people with mental health conditions. They said it offered a distraction from their condition and gave them a sense of an ‘ordinary life’. Disabled people said that having a job was a sign of ‘wellness’ and getting on with life.

Book Full text available online for free

A new vision for adult social care: scoping service users' views

Authors:
HUDSON Bob, DEAREY Melissa, GLENDINNING Caroline
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
42p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

In order to ascertain the ideas and views of service users, the researchers made contact with an extensive list of organisations that represent the interests of service users. The researchers aimed to reflect the entire spectrum of potential users of adult social care services and included organisations representing disabled adults, older people, family carers, drug and alcohol users and other groups of service users.  The paper is in three sections. Section 1 looks at the desired outcomes of a new approach from the perspective of users of services. Section 2 identifies the service principles that would underpin the accomplishment of the outcomes identified in Section 1. Section 3 identifies some implementation issues concerned with matters of structure and process.

Journal article

Mainstreaming equality: the implications for disabled people

Author:
WITCHER Sally
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 4(1), January 2005, pp.55-64.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Mainstreaming equality involves integrating equality considerations from the outset into how an organization operates, its policies and practices. Whether this works to the advantage of disabled people depends critically on the quality of understanding of equality issues for different groups. This paper begins by clarifying goals for social justice, social inclusion and equality and then considers the salience of disabled people as a social category. It briefly reviews different equality strategies, before focusing on mainstreaming and its potential to promote cultural change and socially just distribution. An analytical framework to support mainstreaming is outlined. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of disabled people's involvement with mainstreaming equality if outcomes are to promote social justice.

Book Full text available online for free

Developing an outcomes model for disabled children in Scotland

Author:
CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
67
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Disabled children have broadly the same aspirations as non-disabled children and the outcomes they would like to achieve are therefore similar. However, for many disabled children and young people, there are fundamental outcomes that need to be achieved as a foundation for others, including and especially, communication. This project focused on better understanding ‘outcome models’ for all children and young people and for children and young people in the diverse and challenging context of disability. This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government’s Children’s Rights and Wellbeing Division to identify and develop an outcomes model based on Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC), and the SHANARRI indicators of wellbeing (“Safe, Healthy, Achieving, Nurtured, Active, Respected, Responsible, Included”) for disabled children and young people in Scotland. It was to include both children with disabilities as defined by the Equality Act 2010 and those defined as having additional support needs in the context of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004. The project was modified early on to focus on mapping outcomes work that is already in progress, and to identify the essential components of outcomes models. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Developing an outcomes model for disabled children in Scotland

Author:
CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
3
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government’s Children’s Rights and Wellbeing Division to identify and develop an outcomes model based on Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC), and the SHANARRI indicators of wellbeing, for disabled children and young people in Scotland. It was to include both children with disabilities as defined by the Equality Act 2010 and those defined as having additional support needs in the context of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004. The project was modified early on to focus on mapping outcomes work that is already in progress, and to identify the essential components of outcomes models. These research findings summarises the main report's findings. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Comparing service use of Early Head Start families of children with and without disabilities

Authors:
ZAJICEK-FARBER Michaela L., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Social Work, 14(2), March 2011, pp.159-178.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In the United States, the Early Head Start (EHS) aims to ensure that children from low-income families have good health, strong families and positive early learning experiences. It helps promote positive child development for the very young. This research compared patterns of service utilisation reported by EHS families of children with and without disabilities by secondary analysis of data from the longitudinal investigation of the effectiveness of EHS. Two hundred and eleven families who had data on their disability and services at 7, 16 and 28 months participated. Results indicated comparable positive trends for both groups of families for receipt of services corresponding to EHS performance standards promoting child and family development, family support, and health care. Service challenges remain in the low use of dental services overall and the higher use of acute health care services for children with disabilities. The authors conclude that further research is required to investigate causes and outcomes of service uptake.

Journal article

Use of standardised assessments and outcome measures among a sample of Irish occupational therapists working with adults with physical disabilities

Authors:
STAPLETON Tadhg, MCBREARTY Ciara
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72(2), February 2009, pp.55-64.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This study was carried out to explore the current usage of standardised assessments and outcome measures by occupational therapists working with adults with physical disabilities. A survey research design, using a postal questionnaire specifically designed for the study, was employed. Completed questionnaires were returned by 109 occupational therapists working in a variety of settings, including acute care, community and inpatient rehabilitation. A range of standardised assessments and outcome measures was in use, with an average of four different measures being used by the individual respondents. The most commonly used measures were the Mini Mental State Examination (Folstein et al 1975), Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (Wilson et al 1985), Functional Independence Measure (Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation 1999), Barthel Index (Mahoney and Barthel 1965) and the Chessington Occupational Therapy Neurological Assessment Battery (Tyerman et al 1986). However, the consistency of use tended to be low. The barriers to a more consistent use of standardised assessments and outcome measures included time restraints, the unsuitability of the available measures and a lack of sensitivity of the available measures to capture the effectiveness of occupational therapy. The findings support those of previous studies exploring this issue among occupational therapists from different areas of practice. The respondents in this study highlighted the need for a multifaceted approach, encompassing educational, managerial and individual responsibility, to address the issue of the usage of standardised assessments and outcome measures among occupational therapists.

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