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Book

Raising a din: the final report of a region-wide disability information project which promoted cross-agency work via Disability Information Networks

Author:
CLARKE Alison
Publisher:
Anglia and Oxford Regional Health Authority
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
90p.,diags.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Report on the Oxford Disability Information Project which aims to share lessons and make recommendations.

Book Full text available online for free

Care at its best: overview report of the multidisciplinary regional inspection of the service for disabled children in hospital: October 2005

Author:
MCMAHON Maire
Publisher:
Northern Ireland. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
126p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

For most children and young people, hospital stays can be a daunting experience, but they are usually short and relatively rare events in a child’s life. For a significant number of disabled children, however, hospital admissions can be frequent and prolonged. Their needs bring many additional challenges to the children, their families and the hospital team, as well as to those responsible for their continuing care in the community. It is crucial that all involved in the care of such children should work together in the best possible ways to secure the best possible outcomes for them. This document provides an inspection framework to enable this to happen.

Journal article

Disability in the family: a case for reworking our commitments

Author:
DEWEES Marty
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 3(1), 2004, pp.3-20.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This American article describes a vision for reworking social work's frequently marginal commitment to disability work. Through the lens of an interdisciplinary Maternal Child Health project for children with neurodisabilities and their families, it advocates for several shifts in the profession's commitments. These include a heightened focus on disability practice, a non-pathologizing family-centered approach, the integration of direct and indirect social work methods, and the membership of social workers in interdisciplinary teaming efforts designed to work with families who have children with disabilities. The paper also describes an interdisciplinary project opportunity for students, educators, and practitioners to renew their commitment to families who have children with disabilities in the current practice context and suggests some strategies for generalization to all social work students. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Multidisciplinary quality assessment: the case of a child development team, part 3

Author:
HOWARD Lynne M.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 57(11), November 1994, pp.437-440.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

The third and final part of a series of articles. Explores the findings of the interviews with a range of carers of children with varying diagnoses attending the child development centre. Conclusions are drawn from the research and suggestions made for areas requiring further investigation.

Journal article

Health visitors' role in services for children with disabilities

Authors:
YERBURY Margaret, THOMAS Jim
Journal article citation:
Health Visitor, 67(3), March 1994, pp.86-87.
Publisher:
Health Visitors' Association

Health visitors play a vital role within the specialist child development team providing support for children with disabilities and their families. Reports the findings of a study which revealed the significant contribution of health visitors and nurses in such teams in contributing to the ability of families to develop skills to meet their child's special needs and maximise the child's potential. The study also revealed concern among parents and professionals where no specialist health visiting support was available. This vital service may be at risk from cuts in the health visiting services.

Journal article

The provision of support services: for young adults with physical and mental handicaps

Authors:
THOMAS Andrew P., et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap, 16(3), September 1988, pp.92-96.
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap

The existing deficiencies could be remedied by multi-disciplinary teams for adults with handicaps.

Journal article

Assistive tools for disability arts: collaborative experiences in working with disabled artists and stakeholders

Author:
CREED Chris
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 10(2), 2016, pp.121-129.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the experiences in working collaboratively with physically impaired visual artists and other stakeholders (e.g. disability arts organisations, charities, personal assistants, special needs colleges, assistive technologists, etc.) to explore the potential of digital assistive tools to support and transform practice. Design/methodology/approach: The authors strategically identified key organisations as project partners including Disability Arts Shropshire, Arts Council England, the British Council, SCOPE, and National Star College (a large special needs college). This multi-disciplinary team worked together to develop relationships with disabled artists and to collaboratively influence the research focus around investigating the current practice of physically impaired artists and the impact of digital technologies on artistic work. Findings: The collaborations with disabled artists and stakeholders throughout the research process have enriched the project, broadened and deepened research impact, and enabled a firsthand understanding of the issues around using assistive technology for artistic work. Artists and stakeholders have become pro-active collaborators and advocates for the project as opposed to being used only for evaluation purposes. A flexible research approach was crucial in helping to facilitate research studies and enhance impact of the work. Originality/value: This paper is the first to discuss experiences in working with physically impaired visual artists – including the benefits of a collaborative approach and the considerations that must be made when conducting research in this area. The observations are also relevant to researchers working with disabled participants in other fields. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Inter-agency working with disabled children and young people: conference report; Llandudno, 11th April 2002

Author:
INTER-AGENCY WORKING WITH DISABLED CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE
Publisher:
Wales. Welsh Assembly Government
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
33p.

The aims of this conference where: to share good practice; to enable policy makers and practitioners to reflect on practice in their own agencies in light of current research on what works, and children and young people's perspectives; and to contribute to the wider issues of policy development in this rapidly changing area of social welfare practice.

Book Full text available online for free

One town for my body, another for my mind: services for people with physical impairments and mental health support needs

Author:
MORRIS Jenny
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
76p.
Place of publication:
York

Reports on high levels of dissatisfaction among mental health services users with physical impairments. Two-thirds reported difficulty accessing services. Key concerns included lack of assistance, accessible environments, withdrawal of medication for physical impairment on admission and non-availability when needed, community mental health workers' unfamiliarity with impairments, lack of a co-ordinated approach by GPs and psychiatrists, and fragmented physical/mental needs. People wanted to be seen as whole, with services and professionals communicating and working together. Concludes that services should work together to prevent needs being fragmented by professional and service boundaries.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 2004, 2004, pp.17-22.
Publisher:
Community Care

Part of a special issue focusing on the Children Bill and the green paper, Every Child Matters, arguing that the latter is short on solutions to support disabled children's parents but some schemes are pointing the way. Argues the paper could be more sensitive to circumstances and needs: disabled children who attend special schools some distance from home; the effect of inadequate transport; care before and after school; parents in work taking jobs below their skill levels; better integration - families complain of having to repeat their story to different people; one main contact; and schemes rooted in established multi-agency working.

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