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Journal article

The use and abuse of models of disability

Authors:
LLEWELLYN A., HOGAN K.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(1), January 2000, pp.157-165.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Throughout history, theorists have made use of the technology of the day to provide explanatory models of the behaviour they observe in order to provide an improved understanding of human behaviour. This article shows that models do have their place within disability research and discusses the implications of using the medical and social models of disability, together with two models from development psychology, namely the transactional model and systems theory, will be discussed. Argues that the usage of these models can aid understanding of disability in both research and clinical settings.

Journal article

Constructions and creations: idealism, materialism and disability theory

Author:
PRIESTLEY Mark
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 13(1), February 1998, pp.75-94.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article suggests that a proper understanding of disability theory requires more than a distinction between individual and social model approaches. It is also helpful to distinguish between materialist and idealist explanations. These two dimensions are used to generate a four-fold typology which highlights important differences between the main approaches. Social model approaches are examined in more detail and the article concludes that although social constructionist accounts have been useful they do not provide a sufficient level of explanation.

Journal article

Integrating models of disability: a reply to Shakespeare and Watson

Author:
JOHNSTON Marie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 12(2), April 1997, pp.307-310.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Comments on the article 'Defending the social model' by Shakespeare and Watson in the preceding pages (pp.293-300), and argues that a model of social influence does not rule out a psychological model.

Book

Encouraging a paradigm shift in services for people with disabilities

Author:
COCKS Errol
Publisher:
Edith Cowan University. Faculty of Health and Human Sciences. Centre for the Dev
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
67p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Perth

Paper discussing the belief that human services, particularly services for people with disabilities, are currently dominated by a "modern formal human services paradigm". Because of some of the assumptions inherent in this paradigm and because of broad societal dislocation, it is argued that modern formal human services operate dysfuntionally and contain elements which are inimical to the interests of both vulnerable people and of society. Provides a critique and analysis of the dominant paradigm and presents an alternative model of service provision.

Journal article

Social work with disabled people

Author:
OLIVER M.
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 6.4.89, 1989, p.21.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Explains why an individualist approach to disability is an inappropriate and even disablist model for social work intervention.

Book

The choice model of case management: standards for quality

Authors:
BANKS Penny, KERR Vivien
Publisher:
Choice
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the principles of case management behind the King's Fund's Case Manager Project.

Journal article

The whats, whys and hows of local model activities

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Contact, 61, Autumn 1989, pp.29-3O.
Publisher:
Royal Assocation for Disability and Rehabilitation

The HELIOS - Handicapped People in Europe Living Independently in an Open Society - project aims at integrating disabled people fully into society.

Book Full text available online for free

A systematic review of the costs and effectiveness of different models of paediatric home care

Authors:
PARKER G., et al
Publisher:
NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
118p.
Place of publication:
Southampton

Technological developments in care, the impact of hospital admission on children and their families, changing policies for severely disabled children, and the costs of health care have encouraged the development of paediatric home care (PHC). However, despite increased provision, evidence about effectiveness, costs and impact remains elusive. The objectives were to establish: the range and types of PHC; the effectiveness and costs of PHC; if and how cost-effectiveness differs between different groups of children; the speed of growth of the evidence base; and  what recommendations could be made for further research.

Journal article

Addressing sexual issues in individuals with chronic health conditions

Authors:
CLAIRBORNE Nancy, RIZZO Victoria M.
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Work, 31(3), August 2006, pp.221-224.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This article aims to provide social workers with information about the PLISSIT model, the intervention used for the treatment of people with disabilities or chronic illness who have sexuality issues. PLISSIT stands for the four levels of intervention: i) permission giving, ii) limited information, iii) specific suggestions, and iv) intensive therapy.

Journal article

How is disability understood?: an examination of sociological approaches

Author:
THOMAS Carol
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(6), October 2004, pp.569-583.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper considers sociological understandings of what constitutes disability. Current meanings of disability in both disability studies and medical sociology are examined and compared, using selected articles from leading authors in each discipline as case studies. These disciplines are often represented as offering starkly contrasting approaches to disability, with their differences amounting to a disciplinary 'divide'. It is argued that, on closer inspection, common ground can be found between some writers in disability studies and medical sociology. It is suggested that this situation has arisen because, in disability studies, the social relational understanding of disability developed by Vic Finkelstein and Paul Hunt in the 1970s has been lost over time, overshadowed by the rise to prominence of its offspring: the social model of disability. The paper concludes with some reflections on the need to revive a social relational understanding of disability.

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