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Journal article

Social work with disabled people

Author:
OLIVER M.
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 6.4.89, 1989, p.21.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Explains why an individualist approach to disability is an inappropriate and even disablist model for social work intervention.

Book

Early intervention and disability prevention programmes in Singapore

Author:
SINGAPORE. Ministry of Community Development
Publisher:
Singapore. Ministry of Community Development
Publication year:
1985
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
Singapore
Journal article

Examining the evidence for interventions with children with developmental coordination disorder

Author:
ARMSTRONG Dorothy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75(12), December 2012, pp.532-540.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This critical review of the literature examines the evidence for the effectiveness of a selection of interventions for improving occupational performance in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The search criteria included: children whose primary diagnosis was DCD; research into the effectiveness of an intervention or interventions; interventions that fit with occupational therapy practice (although not necessarily carried out by an occupational therapist); published in peer-reviewed journals; published since 1984; and available in English. The following databases were included: EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC. All articles retrieved were screened for relevance and their reference lists scanned. Nineteen articles were appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Of the approaches reviewed, the evidence points to interventions that use client’s activities of daily living as part of the intervention, such as CO-OP (Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance), as being most effective in improving occupational performance. Other approaches reviewed include; sensory integration, servomotor task training, goal-orientated group intervention, exercise programmes, and compensatory approaches.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Fusion of mental health and incapacity legislation

Authors:
DAWSON John, SZMUKLER George
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 188(6), June 2006, pp.504-509.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The enactment of a single legislative scheme governing nonconsensual treatment of both ‘physical’ and ‘mental’ illnesses, based on incapacity principles, has been mooted in recent law reform debates in the UK. The authors propose a framework for such legislation and consider in more detail the provisions it should contain. The design of legislation that combines the strengths of both incapacity and civil commitment schemes can be readily imagined, based on the criteria for intervention in England and Wales found in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Such legislation would reduce unjustified legal discrimination against mentally disordered persons and apply consistent ethical principles across medical law.

Journal article

Families

Author:
HENRICSON Clem
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 2004, 2004, pp.23-28.
Publisher:
Community Care

Part of a special issue focusing on the Children Bill and the green paper, Every Child Matters, which shows clearly that the Government views family support and taking families out of risk as central to its social inclusion and social cohesion agenda. The timing, nature and effects of interventions are discussed, and practice points for families at risk and disabled parents listed, ending with discussion of cultural competence, integration of knowledge, and a checklist for good practice.

Journal article

A job-seeking self-efficacy scale for people with physical disabilities: preliminary development and psychometric testing

Authors:
BARLOW Julie, WRIGHT Chris, CULLEN Lesley
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 30(1), February 2002, pp.37-53.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

People with disabilities are at an increased risk of unemployment. The role of interventions aiming to enhance the employment prospects of people with disabilities is receiving increased attention. However, evaluation is hampered by the paucity of measures specific to the needs of the target population. The purpose of the present study was to develop and conduct preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of a job-seeking self-efficacy (JSS) scale that reflected the experiences of people with physical disabilities.

Journal article

Disabling ideology in health and welfare: the case of occupational therapy

Author:
ABBERLEY Paul
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 10(2), June 1995, pp.221-232.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Argues, on the basis of an analysis of data from interviews with practitioners, that the rhetoric of partnership and the 'holistic' approach employed by Occupational Therapists is to be understood as an ideology which serves the occupation's professionalising project. Distinguishes Occupational Therapy from other health and welfare specialisms, to perpetuate the notion that disability is an individual problem to which professional intervention can provide the solution, and ascribes responsibility for any perceived failure in therapy to the client rather than the practitioner.

Journal article

Exploring the effects of group therapy for the visually impaired

Authors:
NAYLOR Paige D., LABBE Elise E
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(1), 2017, pp.18-28.
Publisher:
Sage

Individuals with visual impairments may experience varying levels of stress due to their vision loss. This study investigated the effectiveness of a brief stress management group therapy intervention for visually impaired individuals. The measure for evaluating participants’ stress levels was the Calgary Symptoms of Stress Inventory (C-SOSI), and overall well-being was measured via the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). The study evaluated 36 participants, all experiencing varying levels of vision loss, recruited from a regional vision rehabilitation centre. Approximately half of the participants were men (16) and half were women (20). The mean age of participants was 48.2 years (standard deviation [SD] = 12.9 years). This was a predominately African American sample (72%). The C-SOSI was administered before and after participation in an 8-week stress management group. The ORS was administered at every session. Well-being was significantly increased during the first round of the intervention (p = .02). No statistically significant decreases for stress during the first round of the intervention were observed. Those that enrolled in the intervention for a second round of treatment had a significant decrease for stress (p = .001), but not for well-being. Overall, hypotheses were partially supported. Stress scores decreased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant reduction in stress scores was found for those individuals in the second round of the intervention. Well-being also increased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant increase was found only for the first round of the intervention. These results may suggest that individuals need approximately 16 weeks of the intervention to experience significant reductions in their stress levels. The results and implications of the current treatment protocol are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social participation of teenagers and young adults with developmental co-ordination disorder and strategies that could help them: results from a scoping review

Authors:
GAGNON-ROY M., JASMIN E., CAMDEN C.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 42(6), 2016, pp.840-851.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: The impact of developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) on teenagers' and young adults' participation is not well documented. This article aims to synthesize the current knowledge on social participation, which is the performance of an individual in realizing his or her daily activities and social roles within its life environment. Strategies and interventions to support youths (15–25 years old) with DCD were also synthesized. Methods: A scoping review interrogating three databases and using ‘snowballing techniques’ was performed to identify both scientific and grey literature published between 2004 and 2014. Over 1000 documents were screened and 57 were read in full; 28 met inclusion criteria. A charting form based on 12 life habits described in the disability creation process and developed by two reviewers was used to extract data and report the results. Results: All life habits were reported to be affected for teenagers and young adults with DCD, with education and interpersonal relationships being the most frequently discussed. During adolescence and adulthood, new tasks and subsequent difficulties emerge, such as driving. Mental health difficulties emerged as a key theme. Few strategies and interventions were described to support social participation of youths with DCD. Conclusion: Many life habits are challenging for youths with DCD, but few evidence-based strategies and interventions have been designed to help them to increase their social participation. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Evaluation of an agency-based occupational therapy intervention to facilitate aging in place

Authors:
SHEFFIELD Chava, SMITH Charles A., BECKER Mary
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 53(6), 2013, pp.907-918.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Purpose: The United States faces a growing population of older adults and accompanying functional disabilities, coupled with constrained public resources and diminishing informal supports. A variety of interventions that aim to improve client outcomes have been studied, but to date, there is limited translational research that examines the efficacy of moving such interventions from clinical trials to agency settings. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate a restorative occupational therapy intervention relative to “usual care” among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention included a detailed assessment from a person–environment perspective and provision of adaptive equipment and home modifications where appropriate. The intervention (n = 31) and control groups (n = 29) were evaluated at 3 months and assessed for changes in functional status, home safety, falls, health-related quality of life (HRQoL; EQ5D), depression, social support, and fear of falling; a 4 subgroup analysis also examined outcomes by waiting list status. An informal economic evaluation compared the intervention to usual care. Results: Findings indicated improvements in home safety (p < .0005, b = −15.87), HRQoL (p = .03, b = 0.08), and fear of falling (p < .05, b = 2.22). Findings did not show improvement in functional status or reduction in actual falls. The intervention resulted in a 39% reduction in recommended hours of personal care, which if implemented, could result in significant cost savings. Implications: The study adds to the growing literature of occupational therapy interventions for older adults, and the findings support the concept that restorative approaches can be successfully implemented in public agencies. (Publisher abstract)

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