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Journal article

The in-crowd

Author:
GREENWOOD Lynne
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 29.1.04, 2004, pp.40-41.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Obstacles that make it difficult for disabled people to use healthcare premises will soon be outlawed when the Disability Discrimination Act is fully enforced. Looks at what support is available when trusts have to convert their premises.

Journal article

Can do, can't do?

Author:
CARLISLE Daloni
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 22.11.95, 1995, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Can Do, short for Changing Abilities Now: Disability Options, was established by Dumfries and Galloway Health Board to provide services to people with disabilities aged 16-65. This innovative project is now waiting to hear if it has a future.

Journal article

Variations in providers capacity to offer accessible health care for people with disabilities

Authors:
BACHMAN Sara S., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 6(3), 2007, pp.47-63.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Results from a comprehensive Massachusetts-based survey of providers about access to health care for people with primarily physical disabilities are presented, and suggest that a minority of providers report difficulties. Dentists and mental health/substance abuse providers are significantly less likely than others to report that they provide accessible services, are less likely to report having received training related to mobility impairment, the installation of mirrors and accessible doors at their premises, and the provision of help with personal care needs. Conversely, they are more likely to report that their premises pose barriers for disabled people. A social work framework for understanding the individual in a social environment may be the most effective for creating innovative strategies for addressing the complex and multi-dimensional needs of people with disabilities who experience limited access to health care services.(Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

An advocate for care

Author:
OXTOBY Kathy
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 1.08.06, 2006, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The author explains the development of a disability nurse specialist, whose post was developed to improve the hospital experience of people with disabilities and the nurses caring for them.

Journal article

Health care for women with disabilities: population-based evidence of disparities

Authors:
PARISH Susan L., HUH Jungwon
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Work, 3(1), February 2006, pp.7-15.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Despite having similar or better potential access to health care, women with disabilities experience worse health care and worse preventive care than nondisabled women. This study examined the health care of a national probability sample of 8,721 disabled and 45,522 nondisabled women living in the United States. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age and household income, were estimated for eight measures of health care, including three measures of potential access to care, two measures of receipt of preventive services, and postponement of care. Findings signal potentially serious consequences for women with disabilities, who require care at higher rates than their nondisabled counterparts and are at increased risk of developing secondary conditions if their care needs are not met.

Book

Meeting the needs of children with disabilities: families and professionals facing the challenge together

Author:
WARNER Helen K.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
166p.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Children with disabilities have needs that reflect the needs of every child of their age or stage of development, but in addition they will have other needs that are unique and special to them. This text provides the reader with an insight into the needs of children with both physical and learning disabilities, particularly within an acute care setting.

Book Full text available online for free

Babies with anomalies: a Scottish overview

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Programme for Clinical Effectiveness in Reproductive Health
Publisher:
ISD Publications
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report aims to provide an overview, based on a range of data sources, of the prevalence of, and mortality due to, all forms of congenital anomoly. In addition, three specific categories of anomoly have been chosen for more detailed study. The selected anomoly are: congenital heart disease, cleft lip and palate and neural tube defects.

Book

Talking about aphasia: living with loss of language after stroke

Authors:
PARR Susie, et al
Publisher:
Open University Press
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
157p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Buckingham

Looks at living with aphasia, a language impairment which can result from stroke. Draws on in-depth interviews with fifty aphasic people to explore the experience of aphasia from the dramatic onset of stroke and loss of language to the gradual revelation of its long term consequences.

Journal article

Multidisciplinary quality assessment: the case of a child development team, part 3

Author:
HOWARD Lynne M.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 57(11), November 1994, pp.437-440.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

The third and final part of a series of articles. Explores the findings of the interviews with a range of carers of children with varying diagnoses attending the child development centre. Conclusions are drawn from the research and suggestions made for areas requiring further investigation.

Journal article

Comparing service use of Early Head Start families of children with and without disabilities

Authors:
ZAJICEK-FARBER Michaela L., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Social Work, 14(2), March 2011, pp.159-178.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In the United States, the Early Head Start (EHS) aims to ensure that children from low-income families have good health, strong families and positive early learning experiences. It helps promote positive child development for the very young. This research compared patterns of service utilisation reported by EHS families of children with and without disabilities by secondary analysis of data from the longitudinal investigation of the effectiveness of EHS. Two hundred and eleven families who had data on their disability and services at 7, 16 and 28 months participated. Results indicated comparable positive trends for both groups of families for receipt of services corresponding to EHS performance standards promoting child and family development, family support, and health care. Service challenges remain in the low use of dental services overall and the higher use of acute health care services for children with disabilities. The authors conclude that further research is required to investigate causes and outcomes of service uptake.

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