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Book

Making connections: developing inclusive leisure in policy and practice

Author:
MURRAY Pippa
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
61p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This report tries to identify the barriers faced by young disabled people from discussions between young people and service providers. It highlights the social imperative for leisure to be accessible to all. Recommendations and advice are provided for those wishing to replicate such a consultation exercise. Young disabled people are commonly excluded from mainstream leisure services and activities. This report reviews young disabled people’s experience of leisure provision and access, and how leisure providers can work with them to develop more inclusive facilities. The study reports on a project in which young disabled people and service providers came together to discuss the young people’s needs and requirements for leisure, and how these discussions developed. Scattered with quotes from the young people themselves, the report identifies the barriers young people face, including isolation, lack of money and transport, inaccessible buildings and unhelpful attitudes. It reports the young people’s own attitudes to their situation, and their aims and aspirations for the future. It makes a clear case for why leisure should be accessible to all as well as giving many good practice suggestions.

Book Full text available online for free

Everybody here?: play and leisure for disabled children and young people; a Contact a Family survey of families' experiences in the UK

Author:
SHELLEY Pauline
Publisher:
Contact a Family
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
41p.
Place of publication:
London

This report from Contact a Family draws on the experiences of over 1000 families with disabled children in trying to access everyday leisure opportunities across the UK, including swimming pools, cinemas, after school clubs, holiday playschemes and major attractions. Not surprisingly the answer to the question ‘Is everybody here?’ is a very clear no. It provides an overview of current legislation and government policy, identifies the barriers to participation, and ends with clear sets of recommendations to providers and policy-makers. There is also a useful appendix listing attractions positively recommended by parents.

Book

Creating independence and inclusion: youth personal assistance support scheme; good practice guidelines

Author:
JADE Rowan
Publisher:
National Youth Agency
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
69p. + video
Place of publication:
Leicester

The youth personal assistance support scheme (PASS) was set up by the West of England Centre for Inclusive Living to promote the independence, equality and inclusion through the provision of personal assistance to young disabled people. It is based on the belief that young disabled people should have the same rights as adults. This report and video illustrate the development and future plans of the project and invites other organisations to learn from the good practices developed.

Book

Move on up: supporting young disabled people in their transition to adulthood

Author:
MORRIS Jenny
Publisher:
Barnardo's
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
77p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Barkingside

Explores good practice examples of initiatives which prepare young disabled people for adulthood, and presents a set of guidelines based on these which are intended to apply both to leaving care services and those which are specifically targeted at young disabled people, some of whom may be leaving care, others of whom will be leaving home. In four sections; transition to adulthood and young disabled people; supporting this transition; rights and entitlements; and good practice guidelines.

Book

Valued or forgotten: independent visitors and disabled young people

Author:
KNIGHT Abigail
Publisher:
National Children's Bureau
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
76p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

All local authorities are required, under the Children Act 1989, to appoint independent visitors for children and young people who are looked after by the local authority and have little or no contact with their parents. Looks at independent visitor schemes for disabled young people, giving examples of good practice and examining issues or problems which have been experienced. Features the views of young people themselves, giving examples of how independent visitors have affected their lives. Makes a number of recommendations to local authorities and voluntary agencies involved in setting up and running independent visitor schemes, detailing how these services can be developed.

Book

Services for young people with chronic disorders in their transition from childhood to adult life

Editors:
KURTZ Zarrina, HOPKINS Anthony
Publisher:
Royal College of Physicians
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
179p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Looks at what happens to young people with chronic illness or disability as they make the transition from paediatric to adult services. Uses as examples conditions such as cystic fibrosis, epilepsy and diabetes. The need for multidisciplinary involvement is stressed as is the need to base actions on the wishes and the special needs of the young person. Includes guidelines for good practice in the transfer between services.

Book

Our life, our say: a good practice guide to young disabled people's peer mentoring/support

Author:
BETHELL Julie
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
96p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This report is a good-practice guide based on an evaluation of an action research project that was designed to support young disabled people making the transition towards adulthood and inclusive living. It draws on the experience of the Young Disabled People's Peer Mentoring Project based within Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People (GMCDP). The guide is based on the views and experiences of young disabled people, their friends, families, and the professionals, organisations and services who support them in making the transition to adulthood. The guide aims to: give advice to young disabled people and others on how to start their own project; highlight the benefits of self-organisation for youth groups; look at the kind of values and practical resources necessary to make sure the groups succeed ; help support workers and organisations let go of control and involve young disabled people at every level of organisations; and show workers and organisations how to facilitate young disabled people's self-directed groups. With a range of practical suggestions and tips, the guide also highlights: the barriers that young disabled people face; what should be done to address those barriers; the right approach to setting up similar projects; who needs to be involved in making a project genuinely inclusive; and the practical aspects of setting up a project - transport, venue, administration, and accessibility of information.

Book

Group care with children and young people

Author:
THOMPSON Neil
Publisher:
Russell House
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
112p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Lyme Regis
Edition:
2nd

This book can be of help to anyone who works in group care with children and young people whether they are living away from home, for example in children’s homes, hospitals, residential schools, or are in the care of others during the day, for example, at family centres. It cannot give all the answers, but it does enable carers to: improve the important service they provide for children in need and their families; explore and reflect on the many issues that arise in this difficult and demanding, but also rewarding work, linking their practice, prior experience and reading; share ideas and learning with colleagues and be able to use them as a learning resource too; cope with the work’s many pressures; carry on learning and developing. The key concepts and issues relating to group care are clearly explained and are illustrated with relevant practice examples, helpful diagrams and so on. Guidance on good practice is given, including advice on how to avoid some of the common pitfalls and how to develop the skills which make for good child care.

Book

Good practice guidelines

Author:
BARNARDO's
Publisher:
Barnardo's
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Barkingside

These good practice guidelines are intended for services which seek to support young disabled people in their transition to adulthood. The guidelines concern what service providers should try to do. They are based on what young disabled people themselves have said about what helps and does not help in the experience of growing up and becoming more independent.

Book

Disabled children and the law: research and good practice

Authors:
READ Janet, CLEMENTS Luke
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
303p.,list of orgs.
Place of publication:
London

Draws on research on the needs of disabled children, young adults and their families, and indicates how the law can be used to promote good practice and policy development. Explains the overlapping legal responsibilities of social services, health and education, and how to facilitate coordinated practice. Emphasises the importance of an anti-discriminatory approach and of involving parents and children in decision making and advocacy. Includes extensive appendices of resource materials.

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