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Delivering housing adaptations for disabled people: a good practice guide

Authors:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
77p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This document describes the various statutory duties laid upon both social services and housing authorities in relation to their adaptations service. It draws on identified good practice from local authorities across the country in advising on the key issues about how the service should be organised and the full process of delivery from first contact with a client to the completion of the adaptation. The purpose of an adaptation is to modify disabling environments in order to restore or enable independent living, privacy, confidence and dignity for individuals and their families. It is therefore not primarily a matter of building work, the provision of equipment or otherwise modifying a dwelling, but providing an individualised solution to the problems of people experiencing a disabling environment. The primary purpose of this document is to advise local authorities on how they can establish a first class service which can deliver adaptations to the homes of disabled people in order to meet their needs and statutory entitlements.

Book

Scope for fair housing: a literature review of housing with support for younger disabled people who require accessible housing

Authors:
ESMOND Dianne, STEWART Jill
Publisher:
SCOPE
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
88p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The project seeks out and highlights good practice in the delivery of accessible housing with support in the community. This initial study considers the background to the provision of housing with support in the community and what is generally considered to represent good practice. It examines the context within which housing and community care policy interact, bringing together previous research findings and good practice advice. Contents include: definition of disability; key housing concepts in relation to disabled people; the demographic context; housing an support issues; interagency cooperation; user involvement; finance; service provision for black disabled people; criteria of good practice.

Book

More scope for fair housing: a good practice guide to housing and support for disabled people

Authors:
ESMOND Diane, et al
Publisher:
SCOPE
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
112p.
Place of publication:
London

Based on the research findings, this report provides guidance on basic principles, which define good practice in provision of housing and support. Schemes identified as representing good practice shared certain characteristics. In terms of tenure, disabled people wanted to see their rights of occupation maximised even though some residents were not fully aware of what sort of agreement they held. In terms of design, disabled people did not want their housing to stand out as being different. Examples included resisting a sign on the outside of the house proclaiming it to be for disabled people, and wanting ramps to be designed to blend into the property rather than unsightly concrete additions. In terms of the type of housing management and support and care provided, the evidence was that residents saw these as separate areas of their lives, and did not wish one to be dependent on the other. In terms of care and support and independent living, disabled people wanted support to be provided for them as individuals not on a group basis. This gave them control over their lives such as when to get up, when to eat and when to go out. This was hampered when support was shared. It is essential that agencies involved recognise and understand what independent living means to disabled people and ensure equality of opportunity for disabled people. In terms of shared or self-contained housing, the research found no consensus over whether shared (with a room of one's own but sharing some facilities) or self-contained housing, is the ideal. People had different preferences. Some who started with shared accommodation later asked to move to self-contained housing, others preferred to continue sharing. In terms of size, whilst it is not possible to be totally prescriptive about how large a scheme should be, it is easy to see that it would be impractical to satisfy the good practice principles in large residential homes or developments. Where the number of residents housed in one place begins to restrict the choice of individual care and support, privacy and autonomy, and where the aim of the scheme is to provide housing which is integrated into the local community and not identified as special housing, then by definition this is bad practice. The good practice schemes identified in the research and the underpinning principles of good practice reflect and endorse the general movement away from special needs and residential homes to more self-contained independent accommodation. In terms of responding to the needs of people from ethnic minorities, where a scheme is being planned or set up to respond to the housing needs of disabled people from ethnic groups, organisations representing the interests of black disabled people should be consulted. The needs of black disabled people must be met at an individual level, and not subjected to stereotypical assumptions. Account must be taken of language and cultural requirements. In terms of creating sustainable environments to ensure effective and efficient use of resources now and in the future, disabled people and representative groups of disabled people should be consulted on their needs. Information should be collected and records kept on the numbers of disabled people and their needs and the whereabouts of adapted or adaptable housing.

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