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BookDigital Media

Access audit handbook

Author:
GRANT Alison
Publisher:
Centre for Accessible Environments; RIBA Publishing
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
130p., DVD
Place of publication:
London

This is a multimedia planning tool for auditing the accessibility of buildings and services, and writing reports in appropriate formats in the context of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, funding requirements and best practice in building management. The handbook offers straightforward guidance about undertaking access audits and the various report formats to best communicate recommendations. Practical advice is supported by a range of case studies and an authoritative worked example of a successful report based on a real-life access audit. This is supplemented by a series of up-to-date auditing checklists and a DVD that includes both editable, electronic versions of the checklists and an award-winning film, Access Audits: a planning tool for businesses, which will provide a good understanding of what access audits are, their purpose and how to carry one out.

Journal article

Disability and employment in the USA: the quest for best practices

Author:
SMITS Stanley J.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(6), October 2004, pp.647-662.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Reviews the progress in developing policy, national infrastructure, and services in support of disabled people seeking employment in the USA. It reports on a study of best practices in the aftermath of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Workforce Investment Act.

Book

Service for all: making it happen; a report from the Service for All conference held on 18 June 2003 in Edinburgh

Author:
SERVICE FOR ALL CONFERENCE
Publisher:
Scottish Human Services Trust
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The conference aimed to bring people together to exchange information, examples of good practice and ideas about making NHS services more accessible. The main elements of the event were to: understand access from the perspective of people with disabilities, people with mental health problems and older people, what helps and what are the main problems?; identify good practice in Scotland and start a database of good practice; share ideas around practical solutions and on ways to get advice and help from others; and inform ongoing development of policies and advice for the Scottish Executive and the NHS in Scotland on how the NHS and people who use services can work together to improve access. Under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, the NHS and other service providers have to think actively about how to make services accessible. This legislation is important but making this happen is not just about following legislation. It is about people sharing a vision of what a service for all looks like, of imagining better and working together to make it real.

Journal article Full text available online for free

MS: challenges and strategies

Authors:
EVERINGTON Shanta, BLOOMFIELD Jo
Journal article citation:
Disability, Pregnancy and Parenthood International, 67, Winter 2009, pp.4-5.
Publisher:
National Centre for Disabled Parents

Jo Bloomfield, a mother with MS, from Bedford, UK talks about some of the challenges of parenting with multiple sclerosis (MS) and about her experiences of accessing her sons’ school as a disabled parent.

Book

Making connections: developing inclusive leisure in policy and practice

Author:
MURRAY Pippa
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
61p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This report tries to identify the barriers faced by young disabled people from discussions between young people and service providers. It highlights the social imperative for leisure to be accessible to all. Recommendations and advice are provided for those wishing to replicate such a consultation exercise. Young disabled people are commonly excluded from mainstream leisure services and activities. This report reviews young disabled people’s experience of leisure provision and access, and how leisure providers can work with them to develop more inclusive facilities. The study reports on a project in which young disabled people and service providers came together to discuss the young people’s needs and requirements for leisure, and how these discussions developed. Scattered with quotes from the young people themselves, the report identifies the barriers young people face, including isolation, lack of money and transport, inaccessible buildings and unhelpful attitudes. It reports the young people’s own attitudes to their situation, and their aims and aspirations for the future. It makes a clear case for why leisure should be accessible to all as well as giving many good practice suggestions.

Book Full text available online for free

Everybody here?: play and leisure for disabled children and young people; a Contact a Family survey of families' experiences in the UK

Author:
SHELLEY Pauline
Publisher:
Contact a Family
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
41p.
Place of publication:
London

This report from Contact a Family draws on the experiences of over 1000 families with disabled children in trying to access everyday leisure opportunities across the UK, including swimming pools, cinemas, after school clubs, holiday playschemes and major attractions. Not surprisingly the answer to the question ‘Is everybody here?’ is a very clear no. It provides an overview of current legislation and government policy, identifies the barriers to participation, and ends with clear sets of recommendations to providers and policy-makers. There is also a useful appendix listing attractions positively recommended by parents.

Book

National Information Forum: annual review 2002-03

Author:
NATIONAL INFORMATION FORUM
Publisher:
National Information Forum
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

The National Information Forum is a voluntary organisation committed to encouraging the provision of accessible information, by every means possible, for disabled people, asylum seekers, refugees and anyone else disadvantaged in gaining access to information so that they may lead lives of choice in our communities. The aims are to: raise awareness among service providers of the need to make information available in ways that are appropriate to the user; promote and publicise good practice in providing information; and to develop training materials on how best to provide accessible information. This report outlines the work of the organisation to the year ended 31st May 2003.

Book

Inclusive projects: a guide to best on preparing and delivering project briefs to secure access

Author:
DISABLED PERSONS TRANSPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Publisher:
Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
88p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide offers best practice advice on how all participants in the development process can contribute to the delivery of a high quality inclusive environment that provides access to all members of society, including disabled people. the guide: explains the meaning of inclusive environments and conveys the social, legal and commercial benefits; describes the typical stages of the development process; highlights the significant role that ‘Project Briefs’ play in defining the access requirements of a project at every stage; underlines the importance of proactively (rather than through expectation) converting the project briefs into inclusive environments; explains the pivotal role that the ‘Access Champion’ plays in the project briefing and development processes; and explains the roles that the other key participants play in the project briefing and development processes. The guide also provides: best practice guidance on writing project briefs for inclusive environments; best practice guidance on converting the project briefs into inclusive environments; guidance on identifying and appointing a suitable Access Champion; real life examples of common problems and the reasons for them; and a glossary of key terms.

Book Full text available online for free

Report of the task and finish group on care pathways for long term neurological conditions

Author:
WALES. Welsh Assembly Government. Task and Finish Group on Care Pathways for Long Term Neurological Conditions
Publisher:
Wales. Welsh Assembly Government
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This report by the Welsh Neuroscience Expert Group Care Pathways sub-group outlines a process for the development of care pathways to support children, young people and adults with long term neurological conditions. The aim of these pathways is to help people with long term neurological conditions manage their condition, maintain independence and achieve the best possible quality of life through an integrated process of education, information sharing, assessment, care planning and service delivery. It is suggested that this would be as delineated in the National Service Framework for Long Term Conditions for England. Areas addressed are: early recognition, diagnosis and treatment; acute care; early specialist rehabilitation; community and longer term rehabilitation; transitions; vocational and educational rehabilitation; equipment and accommodation; personal care and support for the sufferer, their families and carers; palliative care, care within hospital and other health or social care settings; quality assurance, audit and development.

Book

Our life, our say: a good practice guide to young disabled people's peer mentoring/support

Author:
BETHELL Julie
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
96p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This report is a good-practice guide based on an evaluation of an action research project that was designed to support young disabled people making the transition towards adulthood and inclusive living. It draws on the experience of the Young Disabled People's Peer Mentoring Project based within Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People (GMCDP). The guide is based on the views and experiences of young disabled people, their friends, families, and the professionals, organisations and services who support them in making the transition to adulthood. The guide aims to: give advice to young disabled people and others on how to start their own project; highlight the benefits of self-organisation for youth groups; look at the kind of values and practical resources necessary to make sure the groups succeed ; help support workers and organisations let go of control and involve young disabled people at every level of organisations; and show workers and organisations how to facilitate young disabled people's self-directed groups. With a range of practical suggestions and tips, the guide also highlights: the barriers that young disabled people face; what should be done to address those barriers; the right approach to setting up similar projects; who needs to be involved in making a project genuinely inclusive; and the practical aspects of setting up a project - transport, venue, administration, and accessibility of information.

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