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Book Full text available online for free

Equality in Scotland guide in data sources 2002

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Central Statistics Unit
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Central Statistics Unit
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Equal opportunities is your business too: guidance for Scotland

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Commission for racial Equality
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Commission for Racial Equality
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Explaining the role of sex on disability: a population-based study

Authors:
WRAY Linda A., BLAUM Caroline S.
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 41(4), August 2001, pp.499-510.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The authors investigate whether sex has a direct independent effect on disability or whether sex has an interactive effect on the relationship between chronic diseases/conditions and disability, and whether these effects differed in middle-aged versus older adults. Find that the effect of sex on activities of daily living difficulty is largely explained by social and health-related covariates in middle-aged and older adults. In contrast, the independent association of female sex with decreased strength and mobility in both groups cannot be explained by our models' social or health-related variables. In addition, the positive association of body mass index with mobility difficulty is significantly worse for women than for men.

Journal article

Disability, gender, and unemployment relationships in the United States from the behavioural risk factor surveillance system

Authors:
RANDOLPH Diane Smith, ANDRESEN Elena M.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(4), June 2004, pp.403-418.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Women with disabilities face simultaneous oppression in employment due to discrimination with regard to disability and gender. This article investigates the potential disparity in participation in employment for women, particularly women with disabilities. We analysed weighted data from disability surveillance programs and the Behavioural Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) on over 47,000 respondents. The disability BRFSS was a telephone survey in 11 states and Washington DC. Logistic regression analyses produced adjusted models of the association between gender and employment. Compared with people without disabilities, there were disparities found for people with disabilities, and women with and without disabilities, with the larger discrepancy for women without disabilities. Additional detail about level of employment is needed to make conclusive statements; however, it is clear that disparities in employment continue to exist for women, regardless of their disability status.

Journal article

Disabling masculinity: the isolation of a captive audience

Author:
WILDE Alison
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(4), June 2004, pp.355-370.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

In this article, the author proposes that disabled people tend to engage with and interpret images of people with impairments in a variety of ways that have some degree of correspondence to their structural contexts and their differential access to discursive resources. Contending that gender concerns play a crucial role in the interpretative performances of both disabled and non-disabled participants, it is argued that soap operas are an alienating experience for men in general. I propose that the placement of impairment and disability narratives within the soap opera's structure, as a specific genre, is a particularly demeaning experience for disabled men. Finally, the author raises some questions about agency and resistance in such viewing practices, making specific reference to the experiences of disabled men.

Journal article

The bumpy road to womanhood

Author:
BARRON Karin
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 12(2), April 1997, pp.223-239.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Discusses the results of a qualitative study dealing with societal constraints with regard to womanhood for physically disabled women in Sweden. Findings show that young women are subjected to stereotyped views on what having an impairment involves and have to deal with certain normative criteria of what constitutes womanhood. Despite rejecting the traditional subservient role of 'the disabled' and of women generally, the young women yearn for the pursuing of tasks, such as the caring for children and the home, closely liked to the traditional role of (non-disabled) women. It is argued that this can be understood as a means of counterbalancing an early acquired role of the passive recipient. Alongside a positive identification with the group of 'the disabled', the interviewees strive towards being seen as something other than disabled, i.e. as women.

Book

The experiences of disabled women: findings

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
1995
Place of publication:
York

Disabled women feel they suffer from a broad range of discrimination according to the Disabled Women's Project. The project was designed to reach disabled women who had not had any previous contact with the disability movement and groups of women who were likely to be particularly discriminated against, such as black disabled women, disabled lesbians and disabled older women.

Journal article

Sexual victimization of youth with a physical disability: an examination of prevalence rates, and risk and protective factors

Authors:
MUELLER-JOHNSON Katrin, EISNER Manuel P., OBSUTH Ingrid
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(17), 2014, pp.3180-3206.
Publisher:
Sage

Children with disabilities have been shown to be at greater risk of victimisation than those without. This study used data from a national school-based survey of adolescents (n = 6,749, mean age = 15.41, SD = .66) in Switzerland to investigate sexual victimisation (SV) among physically disabled youth. Two subtypes of SV were differentiated: contact SV, including penetration or touching/kissing, and non-contact SV, such as exhibitionism, verbal harassment, exposure to sexual acts, or cyber SV. A total of 360 (5.1%) youth self-identified as having a physical disability. Lifetime prevalence rates for contact SV were 25.95% for girls with a physical disability (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29 compared with able-bodied girls), 18.50% for boys with physical disability (OR = 2.78 compared with able-bodied boys), and 22.35% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.74 compared with able-bodied youth). For non-contact SV, the lifetime prevalence was 48.11% for girls with a physical disability (OR = 1.44 compared with able-bodied girls), 31.76% for boys with physical disability (OR = 1.95 compared with able-bodied boys), and 40.28% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.67 compared with able-bodied youth). After controlling for other risk factors, physical disability was a significant predictor of contact and non-contact SV for boys, but not for girls. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘I know that aside from my arms I’m normal’: negotiating the incoherencies of a ‘VACTERL identity’

Author:
KALFA Ora
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(1), 2012, pp.65-79.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

VACTERL Association, a medical diagnosis that represents a broad range of characteristics, affects the following body systems: vertebrae; anal; cardiovascular; trachea; esophageal; renal and radial; and limb. A person with three or more problems in any combination may be recognized as fitting in the VACTERL Association. Auditory, growth, sex, and reproductive characteristics are often present as well. Thus far, VACTERL has only been examined within the medical system, and, within that framework, it has become identified as an anomaly and ‘disability,’ leaving the embodied experiential realities of individuals who live with it unexplored. This paper reports on a qualitative study with eight self-identified women with VACTERL Association. All participants were from across the North American continent. The study provides an introduction to the experiences of these women and provides an exploration of the elements and processes of identity negotiation, with particular focus on the intersection between gender and ability. As well, the impact of a medical label as it affects identity formation is examined. Implications for future research are presented.

Journal article

Time away from “smelling the roses”: where do mothers raising children with disabilities find the time to work?

Author:
BRANDON Peter
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(4), August 2007, pp.667-679.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Using the Australian Time Use survey (TUS), this study examined time allocation among working parents raising children with disabilities. Findings showed that raising children with disabilities reduced the time working mothers had for leisure activities, but increased the time for socializing activities. Consistent with the literature, the latter effect probably reflects the special need of working mothers raising children with disabilities for strong social networks offering regular support. While a mother's time for personal care was reduced by a child with a disability, a father's time for personal care was unaffected. Thus, mothers were relatively more disadvantaged than fathers in terms of total time for themselves. This study offers new knowledge on the impact of childhood disability on working parents’ time for personal care and leisure, activities that can improve their psychological and physical well-being.

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