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Journal article Full text available online for free

Fusion of mental health and incapacity legislation

Authors:
DAWSON John, SZMUKLER George
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 188(6), June 2006, pp.504-509.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The enactment of a single legislative scheme governing nonconsensual treatment of both ‘physical’ and ‘mental’ illnesses, based on incapacity principles, has been mooted in recent law reform debates in the UK. The authors propose a framework for such legislation and consider in more detail the provisions it should contain. The design of legislation that combines the strengths of both incapacity and civil commitment schemes can be readily imagined, based on the criteria for intervention in England and Wales found in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Such legislation would reduce unjustified legal discrimination against mentally disordered persons and apply consistent ethical principles across medical law.

Journal article

It takes two to tango: the integration of people with disabilities into society

Authors:
VAN DE VEL Leontine, et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(3), May 2005, pp.311-329.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The concept of integration is not well defined. It not known how people with disabilities experience integration. In this study qualitative methods were used. The aim of the article is to define a model of successful integration based on the perspectives of people with disabilities and people within their social environment. Integration consists of five elements: functioning ordinarily without receiving special attention, mixing with others that are not disabled, taking part in society, trying to realize one’s potential and directing one’s own life. Integration is obtained through a process of interaction between a person with a disability and society. This process is influenced by personal, societal and support factors. The individual with a disability and society have a mutual responsibility with respect to integration.

Journal article

Choices and rights: eugenics, genetics and disability equality

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 13(5), November 1998, pp.665-681.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article explores some current issues in human genetics and pre-natal diagnosis and develops an informed analysis from a disability equality perspective.

Book Full text available online for free

Dignity and older Europeans: final report of focus groups of Spanish professionals

Author:
BLASCO Sergio Arino
Publisher:
Dignity and Older Europeans Consortium
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
76p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

The right to, and the need for dignity is frequently cited in policy documents relating to the health and social care of older people. It is also expressed as an important value in professional codes and declarations of human rights. Yet concerns about the standards of care for a growing number of older people abound despite global ageing being a well-recognised Dignity and Older Europeans is an international research project which brings together a range of academics, clinicians, and user groups to explore the concept of dignity in the lives of Older Europeans. The project spanned 3 years until December 2004 and involved 8 partners from 6 European countries including Spain.

Book

Educating for dignity: a multi-disciplinary workbook

Author:
DIGNITY AND OLDER EUROPEANS CONSORTIUM
Publisher:
Dignity and Older Europeans Consortium
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
93p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This study material was developed from an international research project 'Dignity and Older Europeans'. The material is derived from contributions from older people; health and social care professionals and other members of the public in the six countries which took part in the research UK (England and Wales), France, Ireland, Spain, Sweden and Slovakia. The learning activites are presented in four sections: Old Age - what does it mean?; Understanding Dignity; Dignity in care; and The impact of the system. Each section includes narratives based around the key themes that emerged from the study. The concluding section offers a brief discussion of the exercises and provides an overview of the main findings.

Journal article

Dignity and the older European: policy recommendations

Authors:
EDGAR Andrew, NORDENFELT Lennart
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 6(2), July 2005, pp.17-20.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

The Dignity and Older Europeans Research Group had produced a series of recommendations on policy.  The policy recommendations are inspired by the data gathered from focus groups, as well as by the theoretical reflections on the concept of 'dignity'.  This article introduces four core policy recommendations.  The first reflects the rights of the older person, the second calls for the removal of ageism and ageist practices, the third concerns the regulatory frameworks needs in service provision and the fourth reflects the welfare entitlements of older people.

Journal article

Educating for dignity

Authors:
TADD Win, DIEPPE Paul
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 6(2), July 2005, pp.4-9.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project.  Following a discussion of the development process, the materials themselves are described.  The materials include a poster of the dignity balance, which contains five core messages and illustrates the impact of both enhancing and violating individual dignity.  The second product is a leaflet that also includes the dignity balance and lists of actions and approaches that will promote dignity or result in indignity.  The final product to date is a multidisciplinary workbook, which is described in some detail. The workbook Educating for Dignity provides a brief outline of the theoretical model of dignity, and four different sections based on the empirical findings: understanding dignity, old age - what is it like to be an older person, dignity in care, and the impact of the system.

Journal article

Electronic assistive technology: benefits for all?

Author:
GATWARD John
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 7(4), December 2004, pp.13-17.
Publisher:
Emerald

For more than a decade there has been a powerful drive towards providing care services to older and disabled people in their own homes. Technology is beginning to provide devices and systems to help do this in a practical way that not only benefits service users and their carers but also has the potential to be very cost-effective. However, the ethics of telecare will increasingly demand attention. Highlights the need to address the problems of social isolation by care systems designed to use electronic assistive technology.

Book

Implementing the social model of disability: theory and research

Editors:
BARNES Colin, MERCER Geof
Publisher:
Disability Press
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
233p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Leeds

This book contains 13 chapters on the theoretical and research implications of the social model of disability. Over the last three decades disability activists have established the social model of disability as a comprehensive critique of mainstream academic theories and policy approaches. The contributors, including established figures and newcomers to the field, raise a number of important controversies and concerns central to theorising and researching disability in the 21st century. Taken together they provide ample testimony to the continuing vitality of debates around the social model in disability studies.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Whose life is it anyway?

Author:
DOWSON Steve
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 24.07.03, 2003, pp.38-39.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

There is apparently little concern about the possible impact of the new genetic sciences on the shape of humankind. The public may have qualms about some developments, such as human cloning, but the prospect of using the new knowledge to eradicate inherited illness and impairment is apparently welcomed without qualification. Some disability organisations, however, are expressing deep concern about where the science is leading us. Those people who most loudly defend the rights of disabled people are likely to base their position on a broader framework of human rights - a framework that will make them equally vehement in support of "a woman's right to choose".

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