Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"physical disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 16

Journal article

Shaping the future: report on the blind and partially sighted young people

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Childright, 172, December 2000, p.14.
Publisher:
Children's Legal Centre

Summarises the key findings of a recent report examining the barriers faced by the blind and partially sighted in everyday life. This article focuses on the lack of support these children receive in education.

Journal article

Pharos: self-assessment tools for service development and improvement for schools, educational, and support services for young learners with visual impairment

Authors:
JONES Robert D., PRAIN Iain
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 32(2), 2014, pp.170-174.
Publisher:
Sage

Specialised schools for the visually impaired have been in existence for a great number of years. However, in the latter half of the 20th century there began a debate, which continues today, as to their relevance in an age of inclusion. Those schools that remain may well be greatly experienced in teaching learners with little or no sight. They do not, however, have a preordained right to always exist, particularly as islands in an increasingly interconnected and accountable education system. Pharos is a self-evaluation tool, developed from an European Union (EU) funding school project, which all service providers, including special schools, can assess their progress towards being part of an interconnected model of partnership, sharing, and cooperation so that the diverse educational needs of young people with visual impairment are met. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Educating children with visual impairments in rural South India: examining maternal belief profiles

Author:
JACOB Namita
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(3), May 2005, pp.277-291.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Mothers of young children with visual impairments in rural Tamil Nadu, India, were interviewed to form an understanding of the belief contexts that surround their attitude to accessing education for their children. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques were used in analysis. Descriptive discriminant analysis was used to create belief profiles useful in understanding mothers’ engagement in their child’s education. The belief profiles obtained incorporated mothers’ expectations concerning the child’s education, work, and marriage, and their feelings of control over their child’s future, highlighting the importance of placing beliefs themselves in a larger ideological context.

Journal article

I am the fighter until the last moment: the relationship of race/ethnicity and education to self-reported coping strategies among older adults with visual impairment

Authors:
LEE Eun-Kyyoung, BRENNAN Mark
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 2(4), 2003, pp.3-28.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study examines how race/ethnicity and educational attainment are related to coping strategies and adaptation to age-related visual impairment among older adults. Narrative data from two previous studies of adaptation to vision impairment (n's = 155 and 343, respectively) were analyzed with qualitative methods. Results indicated that ethnicity of informants played an important role in relation to the type of coping strategies reported, which reflected differences in value systems and sociocultural contexts for each racial group. Educational levels were related to differences in the informants' help-seeking behaviors, attitudes toward learning, and the different kinds of coping resources available. These findings underscore the complexity of needs in the older visually impaired population. Implications of these findings for practitioners working with this population are discussed. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Book

Within reach: an evaluation of the schools access initiative

Author:
SCOPE
Publisher:
National Union of Teachers
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
London

This study evaluates the Schools Access Initiative (SAI), which aims to increase access to mainstream schools for pupils with a physical or sensory impairment. The aim of the study is to follow up on to earlier reports: ‘Within reach: a study’ (1992) and ‘Within reach: the school survey’ (1993). These earlier reports were the basis for a campaign which preceded the introduction of SAI. A sample of eight LEAs and twenty seven schools are used as a basis for the report. Attitudes to inclusion; LEA knowledge of accessibility; views on management of the SAI; and sufficiency of the SAI are looked at.

Book

Shaping the future: the educational experiences of 5-16 year old blind and partially sighted children and young people

Authors:
FRANKLIN Anita, et al
Publisher:
Royal National Institute for the Blind
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
185p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Based on the RNIB's survey of the experiences of visually impaired children and young people, this covers topics such as type of school attended, provision for special needs, reading media and equipment, access to the national curriculum and examinations, mobility lessons, bullying, careers advice and what young people think makes a good school. Separate data is provided for pupils with complex additional needs.

Book

Together we can plan my future: the needs of school leavers with a visual impairment and additional disabilities

Author:
SeeABILITY
Publisher:
SeeABILITY
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
79p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Leatherhead

Report focusing on the needs of young people with a visual impairment who also have additional disabilities and who are about to leave school in the West Country. Includes sections on: a profile of the West of England; the young people's disabilities; their future needs; the needs of parents; and summary of key findings.

Book

Gone missing: a research and policy review of disabled children living away from their families

Author:
MORRIS Jenny
Publisher:
Who Cares Trust
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
106p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Report looking at the experiences of children and young people with disabilities who spend most or all of their childhood away from their families in some form of residential provision. Contains 10 life stories of adults who lived away from home as children.

Book

Signposts to special needs: an information pack on meeting special educational needs in the mainstream classroom

Author:
NATIONAL CHILDREN'S BUREAU
Publisher:
National Children's Bureau
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
19 leaflets in pack.
Place of publication:
London

Contains information sheets on: meeting individual needs; assessment, the National Curriculum and special educational needs; managing behaviour; learning support services; parents as partners; pre-school children; childhood disorders; emotional and behavioural difficulties; boys with haemophilia; hearing impairment; hyperactivity; motor impairment; moderate learning difficulties; severe learning difficulties; specific learning difficulties; speech and language difficulties; and visually impaired pupils.

Journal article

'Orange in a world of apples': the voices of albinism

Author:
WAN Nathalie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 18(3), May 2003, pp.277-296.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Albinism is a rare genetic condition that affects the pigmentation of the retina, hair and skin. Consequently, people with albinism world-wide experience the stigma and negative repercussions of an unconventional physical appearance, as well as a visual impairment. The medical literature has focused extensively on the genetics of albinism amongst animals, but it has been relatively under-studied and ignored in sociology. People with albinism have rarely had the opportunity to tell their stories; to tell their sorrows and their triumphs. This paper attempts to remedy this failure in social science. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven women and five men, living in various countries globally. The study is framed around the role theory of stigma and 'spoiled identity', as well as the more recent Disability Studies that stresses 'the normals' as being the 'identity spoilers' or the 'problem'. The participants revealed victimisation from various sources including students, teachers, employers, colleagues, strangers and the medical profession. Focus is placed on the strategies that respondents have devised in coping with these adversities. The results identify principal methods of reaction and response to the discrimination against people with albinism. These eight different strategies of resistance to the stigmatisation of albinism are essential elements of personal change and even, possibly, social change. This paper quotes respondents' own words. Such methodology offers the chance for people with albinism to voice their experiences, and for us researchers to listen and learn.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts