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Results 1 - 9 of 9

Book

Each belongs: integrated education in Canada

Author:
SHAW Linda
Publisher:
Centre for Studies on Integration in Education
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London

The goal of the Hamilton and Waterloo Catholic School Boards in Ontario, Canada, is to meet the needs of all children in age-appropriate classes in neighbourhood schools. There are no special schools. This report describes local school board policy and practice, covers integration strategies, including some detailed case studies, and investigates the parents’ perspective. It captures the spirit of these inclusive school communities in a series of integration strategies including some case studies and investigates the parents’ perspectives.

Journal article

Participation in higher education for students with disabilities: an Irish perspective

Authors:
SHELVIN M., KENNY M., MCNEELA E.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(1), January 2004, pp.15-30.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This small scale study aimed to explore the quality of access and participation for students with disabilities within higher education. Students with disabilities reported variable access experiences within higher education and physical access remains a serious obstacle to full participation. Generally, there was a low level of awareness of student needs in relation to assistive provision and assessment. A positive and informed staff/college attitude proved crucial in ensuring access and equitable treatment. This research highlights the inherent limitations in the current piecemeal institutional response to provision for students with disabilities. A comprehensive access service is required that addresses the needs of all marginalized groups and becomes an integral part of the third level institution.

Book

Inclusive education: diverse perspectives

Authors:
NIND Melanie, et al
Publisher:
David Fulton
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
310p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

This book draws upon the experiences and practices of academics and professionals within the inclusive education sphere. Enabling the reader to stay in touch with what has led to the current agenda in inclusive education and its future development, this book includes: the views of people with learning difficulties and disabilities; comparison of different approaches to inclusion; and discussion of current events and what they tell us about inclusion.

Book

Human rights and school change: the Newham story

Authors:
JORDAN Linda, GOODEY Chris
Publisher:
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
Bristol
Edition:
2nd

This book charts the steps which brought about the closure of most of the separate special schools and units in Newham, East London, over a 12-year-period, 1984-96. At the same time Newham's ordinary schools have undergone major changes to improve provision for all pupils. The report describes the London education authority's de-segregation programme to bring disabled children into mainstream schools.

Journal article

Explaining variance in achievement motivationamong learning disability (LD) students in regular education classrooms

Author:
MARKWARD Martha J.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 1(1), 2002, pp.27-38.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This qualitative study identifies individual and situational differences that might explain why some LD students acquire a greater sense of mastery in regular educational settings than do other LD students. The author questioned the teachers of the six LD students about the learning experiences of those students in an achievement situation. Teacher responses suggest thatseveral individual and situational differences have implications for social workers interested in bringing about correspondence in the cues teachers give and the ones LD students need to acquire a sense of mastery in an inclusive setting.

Book Full text available online for free

Removing barriers to achievement: the government's strategy for SEN: executive summary

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham

All children have the right to a good education and the opportunity to fulfil their potential. All teachers should expect to teach children with special educational needs (SEN) and all schools should play their part in educating children from their local community,whatever their background or ability. This strategy follows discussion with a wide range of practitioners and policy makers in local authorities, the health service and the voluntary sector, as well as children and young people. It sets out the Government’s vision for the education of children with SEN and disabilities. It provides clear national leadership, supported by an ambitious programme of sustained action and review, nationally and locally, over a number of years, in four key areas: early intervention to ensure that children who have difficulties learning receive the help they need as soon as possible and that parents of children with SEN and disabilities have access to suitable childcare; removing barriers to learning, by embedding inclusive practice to every school and early years setting; Raising expectations and achievement by developing teachers’ skills and strategies for meeting the needs of children with SEN and sharpening our focus on the progress made by children with SEN; and delivering improvements in partnership taking a hands-on approach to improvement so that parents can be confident that their child will get the education they need.

Book Full text available online for free

Removing barriers to achievement: the government's strategy for SEN

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
93p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham

All children have the right to a good education and the opportunity to fulfil their potential. All teachers should expect to teach children with special educational needs (SEN) and all schools should play their part in educating children from their local community,whatever their background or ability. This strategy follows discussion with a wide range of practitioners and policy makers in local authorities, the health service and the voluntary sector, as well as children and young people. It sets out the Government’s vision for the education of children with SEN and disabilities. It provides clear national leadership, supported by an ambitious programme of sustained action and review, nationally and locally, over a number of years, in four key areas: early intervention to ensure that children who have difficulties learning receive the help they need as soon as possible and that parents of children with SEN and disabilities have access to suitable childcare; removing barriers to learning, by embedding inclusive practice to every school and early years setting; Raising expectations and achievement by developing teachers’ skills and strategies for meeting the needs of children with SEN and sharpening our focus on the progress made by children with SEN; and delivering improvements in partnership taking a hands-on approach to improvement so that parents can be confident that their child will get the education they need.

Book

Inclusive education: learners and learning contexts

Editor:
NIND Melanie
Publisher:
David Fulton
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
287p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Engages with a diversity of learners and learning contexts within the sphere of inclusive education. Aiming to explore questions such as, how to respond to children at risk of exclusion, and what we can learn from each other in enhancing inclusion, this book includes: an examination of issues of gender, ethnicity, class, culture, sexuality and disability; and an examination of inclusive practice in different schools, different classrooms and beyond.

Book

Social work with children: the educational perspective

Authors:
BLYTH Eric, MILNER Judith
Publisher:
Longman
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
174p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Harlow

Aims to encourage social workers to work with confidence with other organisations and professionals such as teachers to help children whose educational achievement is poor. Includes chapters on: education reform in Britain; social work and schooling; education of children in the public care; children who care for others; school attendance; disabled children; pupils with behaviour problems; and protecting children from abuse and exploitation.

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