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Journal article

Special children, integration and moral education

Author:
LEICESTER Mal
Journal article citation:
Children and Society, 8(4), 1994, pp.300-311.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper explores issues concerning the integration of children with disabilities into mainstream schools and draws out the implications of the discussions for moral education. Social and personal theories of disability are reconciled to provide a basis for a moral education which bridges 'alternative' moral traditions. The author argues that successful integration requires a moral education for teachers and pupils which encourages the development of both a 'caring justice' and a 'judicious care'.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, October 2000, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Community Care

Research from many sources reveals that their disability has a substantial impact on children's experiences at school. Moreover they are capable of participating in decisions about how to cope with it, and that they want to be allowed to participate in this way.

Journal article

Integration and its future: a case study of primary education and physical disability

Authors:
HADLEY Roger, WILKINSON Heather
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 10(3), September 1995, pp.309-323.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article describes a case study of the integration in mainstream schooling in two LEA's of children of primary school age with physical disabilities. Levels of disability are compared with the location of the children in the school system and any special provision made for them. Quality of provision is also explored. Factors affecting the overall levels of integration in the LEA's and differences between them are examined and the wider implications of recent legislation for the future development of integration are discussed in the light of the findings of the study.

Journal article

Pharos: self-assessment tools for service development and improvement for schools, educational, and support services for young learners with visual impairment

Authors:
JONES Robert D., PRAIN Iain
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 32(2), 2014, pp.170-174.
Publisher:
Sage

Specialised schools for the visually impaired have been in existence for a great number of years. However, in the latter half of the 20th century there began a debate, which continues today, as to their relevance in an age of inclusion. Those schools that remain may well be greatly experienced in teaching learners with little or no sight. They do not, however, have a preordained right to always exist, particularly as islands in an increasingly interconnected and accountable education system. Pharos is a self-evaluation tool, developed from an European Union (EU) funding school project, which all service providers, including special schools, can assess their progress towards being part of an interconnected model of partnership, sharing, and cooperation so that the diverse educational needs of young people with visual impairment are met. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Each belongs: integrated education in Canada

Author:
SHAW Linda
Publisher:
Centre for Studies on Integration in Education
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London

The goal of the Hamilton and Waterloo Catholic School Boards in Ontario, Canada, is to meet the needs of all children in age-appropriate classes in neighbourhood schools. There are no special schools. This report describes local school board policy and practice, covers integration strategies, including some detailed case studies, and investigates the parents’ perspective. It captures the spirit of these inclusive school communities in a series of integration strategies including some case studies and investigates the parents’ perspectives.

Book

Why it's worth it: inclusive education in Scotland; a parents' perspective

Author:
MOLLARD Ceri
Publisher:
Scottish Human Services Trust
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
156p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This book was written after speaking with 15 parents of children with special educational needs throughout Scotland about their child’s experiences of inclusive education in mainstream school. The families interviewed included children and young people at all stages of education from nursery right through to 18 year olds just about to leave school, and a range of experiences of education and inclusion from very positive to very negative. The experiences that are recounted in this book are real life illustrations of what it is like for families to include their children in mainstream schools in Scotland today. These accounts provide practical examples of what works and what doesn’t work to make pupils and their families feel like an included part of their chosen mainstream school. The book explores all aspects of school inclusion including the policy context, access to information, planning and support of inclusive placements, legal exclusions from mainstream school and the benefits of inclusion for everyone.

Book

Human rights and school change: the Newham story

Authors:
JORDAN Linda, GOODEY Chris
Publisher:
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
Bristol
Edition:
2nd

This book charts the steps which brought about the closure of most of the separate special schools and units in Newham, East London, over a 12-year-period, 1984-96. At the same time Newham's ordinary schools have undergone major changes to improve provision for all pupils. The report describes the London education authority's de-segregation programme to bring disabled children into mainstream schools.

Journal article

Explaining variance in achievement motivationamong learning disability (LD) students in regular education classrooms

Author:
MARKWARD Martha J.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 1(1), 2002, pp.27-38.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This qualitative study identifies individual and situational differences that might explain why some LD students acquire a greater sense of mastery in regular educational settings than do other LD students. The author questioned the teachers of the six LD students about the learning experiences of those students in an achievement situation. Teacher responses suggest thatseveral individual and situational differences have implications for social workers interested in bringing about correspondence in the cues teachers give and the ones LD students need to acquire a sense of mastery in an inclusive setting.

Book

Within reach: an evaluation of the schools access initiative

Author:
SCOPE
Publisher:
National Union of Teachers
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
London

This study evaluates the Schools Access Initiative (SAI), which aims to increase access to mainstream schools for pupils with a physical or sensory impairment. The aim of the study is to follow up on to earlier reports: ‘Within reach: a study’ (1992) and ‘Within reach: the school survey’ (1993). These earlier reports were the basis for a campaign which preceded the introduction of SAI. A sample of eight LEAs and twenty seven schools are used as a basis for the report. Attitudes to inclusion; LEA knowledge of accessibility; views on management of the SAI; and sufficiency of the SAI are looked at.

Book

Service support for children with a chronic illness or physical disability attending mainstreams schools

Authors:
LIGHTFOOT Jane, MUKHERJEE Suzanne, SLOPER Patricia
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
183p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

Aims to identify needs for NHS support for schools as expressed by children with special health needs, their parents and teachers, and to make recommendations for good practice. Commences with a review of relevant literature. Examines results of focus group discussions, which raised issues relating to school absence, exclusion from school life, support from peers and teachers, and medical care. Finally reports on conclusions arising from workshops with managers and professionals from education and health care.

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