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Journal article

The whats, whys and hows of local model activities

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Contact, 61, Autumn 1989, pp.29-3O.
Publisher:
Royal Assocation for Disability and Rehabilitation

The HELIOS - Handicapped People in Europe Living Independently in an Open Society - project aims at integrating disabled people fully into society.

Journal article

Conductive education and the politics of disablement

Author:
READ Janet
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 13(2), April 1998, pp.279-293.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Discusses how conductive education has been characterised by some disabled academics as an intervention that is oppressive to disabled people. This article describes the practice of Conductive Education and its development in the United Kingdom and explores why it came to be perceived by some from within the disabled people's movement as contrary to their interests.

Book

Disability studies: emerging insights and perspectives

Editors:
CAMPBELL Thomas, et al, (eds.)
Publisher:
Disability Press
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
54p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

Highlighting how disability studies has established itself as an increasingly important discipline in its own right, this book adds to the field by providing original insights and perspectives from newcomers. The book presents a selection of papers presented at the ‘Centre for Disability Studies Postgraduate Research Student Conference’, held at the University of Leeds. The nine chapters detail both new areas of theoretical and empirical enquiry and address issues such as: access to education, the affirmation model, anorexia nervosa, international perspectives of disability, notions of ‘perfect sex’ and sociologies of impairment. This book will be of interest to those concerned with cutting edge research in Disability Studies and related fields.

Book

Finding a voice: self-advocacy theory and practice

Author:
ANTOLAK Richard
Publisher:
Falkirk. Community Education Unit
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
152p.
Place of publication:
Falkirk

Looks at how tutors and participants in a self-advocacy course navigate their way through a maze of experiences, emotions and challenges. Part one examines the different models of self-advocacy and highlights the terminology used by many workers. Also looks critically at motives for working in the area of special needs, and examines why, in a world where everyone is supposedly equal, the fight for disabled people to be treated as such continues to be an uphill struggle. Part two concentrates on practice and methods used to promote self-advocacy. Uses the arts to encourage confidence and self esteem and gives examples of actual activities, highlighting sessions that went wrong and examining the reasons why.

Journal article

Pharos: self-assessment tools for service development and improvement for schools, educational, and support services for young learners with visual impairment

Authors:
JONES Robert D., PRAIN Iain
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 32(2), 2014, pp.170-174.
Publisher:
Sage

Specialised schools for the visually impaired have been in existence for a great number of years. However, in the latter half of the 20th century there began a debate, which continues today, as to their relevance in an age of inclusion. Those schools that remain may well be greatly experienced in teaching learners with little or no sight. They do not, however, have a preordained right to always exist, particularly as islands in an increasingly interconnected and accountable education system. Pharos is a self-evaluation tool, developed from an European Union (EU) funding school project, which all service providers, including special schools, can assess their progress towards being part of an interconnected model of partnership, sharing, and cooperation so that the diverse educational needs of young people with visual impairment are met. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What a difference a decade makes: reflections on doing 'emancipatory' disability research

Author:
BARNES Colin
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 18(1), January 2003, pp.3-17.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article provides a broad-based overview of the development of emancipatory disability research in the UK since its emergence in 1992. Drawing on personal experience in the field, the author responds to several important considerations that need to be addressed before considering adopting this controversial perspective. The paper is divided into two main sections. The first part provides a concise introduction to the thinking that underpins the concept of emancipatory disability research. The second section discusses key elements of this approach including the problem of accountability, the social model of disability, choice of methods and, empowerment, dissemination and outcomes. The paper concludes by suggesting that whilst there has been considerable progress over the last decade the future of emancipatory disability research remains precarious.

Journal article

What's so special? Teachers models and their realisation in practice in segregated schools

Authors:
ADAMS Joan, SWAIN John, CLARK Jim
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(2), March 2000, pp.223-245.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The concept of 'special' has played a crucial role in the development of educational policy and practice, and the meaning of the term has been the subject of far-reaching debates and controversy. This paper is based on research which explored the meaning of 'specialness' in theory and practice from the point of view of practitioners working in segregated schools, providing education for young people designated as having moderate and severe learning difficulties. The research demonstrates the articulation of the individual model of special in teachers' thinking about pupils, themselves and their relationships with pupils, and also in the learning environment provided for different categories of young people. The authors argue that the dominant discursive practices of practitioners construct and maintain 'otherness' in special education, and pre-empt alternative discourses.

Journal article

Self-determination, knowledge, instruction and incarcerated students

Author:
HOUCHINS David E.
Journal article citation:
Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 7(3), August 2002, pp.132-151.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The purpose of this article is to examine the self-determination knowledge of incarcerated students with and without disabilities using a pretest/posttest experimental control group design. In contrast to previous studies conducted in the public school setting, a significant relationship between self-determination knowledge and self-determination instruction was not found. Possible reasons for the lack of significance include the restrictive nature of the juvenile justice setting and the need for positive self-determined role models within the juvenile justice setting. Students' self-determination knowledge was also examined in relationship to self-determination knowledge instruction and to students' gender, reading level, math level and disability. A significant relationship was found between self-determination knowledge and gender, reading level, mathematics level and disability status (i.e. being identified as having any disability).

Book

A coherent policy for the rehabilitation of people with disabilities: recommendation no. R(92)6 adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 9 April 1992 ...; a model rehabilitation programme for national authorities

Author:
COUNCIL OF EUROPE
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
60p.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Recommendations which take into account the training of non-health staff, technical aids, sporting activities and practical measures for the employment of people with physical or learning disabilities.

Book

Disabled people in Britain and discrimination: a case for anti-discrimination legislation

Author:
BARNES Colin
Publisher:
British Council of Organisations of Disabled People/Hurst & Co
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
282p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Clay Cross

Challenges the perception that disabled people are clients of social services. Outlines legislative action taken in other countries to ensure that disabled people have the same rights as others. Argues that in Britain we have failed to attack discriminatory practices because of the entrenched charity model of services. Includes chapters on: education; employment; social security; housing and transport; leisure and the influence of the media; and political life.

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