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Journal article

Max versus max: disability-related services in the U.S. and Germany

Author:
ORGASSA Ute C.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 2(2/3), 2003, pp.87-100.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Compares disability-related services and experiences of the United States of America and Germany. Follows a fictional case example concerning a person with a developmental disability from birth to adulthood and provides examples of possible life choices.

Book

Early intervention studies for young children with special needs

Editors:
MITCHELL David, BROWN Roy I.
Publisher:
Chapman and Hall
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
355p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Describes the need to identify children with special needs, and facilities that are being developed for this. Discusses the role of the parent in facilitating early learning, and the needs of parents when a child is diagnosed as having a disability. Also looks at advocacy and staff training.

Book

Cerebral palsy: problems and practice

Authors:
GRIFFITHS Margaret, CLEGG Mary
Publisher:
Souvenir Press
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
179p., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Aimed at parents and professionals - gives practical advice on dealing and coping with handicapped children. Emphasises the individual assessment of each child's needs to prepare them for independent adulthood.

Book Full text available online for free

Removing barriers to achievement: the government's strategy for SEN: executive summary

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham

All children have the right to a good education and the opportunity to fulfil their potential. All teachers should expect to teach children with special educational needs (SEN) and all schools should play their part in educating children from their local community,whatever their background or ability. This strategy follows discussion with a wide range of practitioners and policy makers in local authorities, the health service and the voluntary sector, as well as children and young people. It sets out the Government’s vision for the education of children with SEN and disabilities. It provides clear national leadership, supported by an ambitious programme of sustained action and review, nationally and locally, over a number of years, in four key areas: early intervention to ensure that children who have difficulties learning receive the help they need as soon as possible and that parents of children with SEN and disabilities have access to suitable childcare; removing barriers to learning, by embedding inclusive practice to every school and early years setting; Raising expectations and achievement by developing teachers’ skills and strategies for meeting the needs of children with SEN and sharpening our focus on the progress made by children with SEN; and delivering improvements in partnership taking a hands-on approach to improvement so that parents can be confident that their child will get the education they need.

Book Full text available online for free

Removing barriers to achievement: the government's strategy for SEN

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
93p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham

All children have the right to a good education and the opportunity to fulfil their potential. All teachers should expect to teach children with special educational needs (SEN) and all schools should play their part in educating children from their local community,whatever their background or ability. This strategy follows discussion with a wide range of practitioners and policy makers in local authorities, the health service and the voluntary sector, as well as children and young people. It sets out the Government’s vision for the education of children with SEN and disabilities. It provides clear national leadership, supported by an ambitious programme of sustained action and review, nationally and locally, over a number of years, in four key areas: early intervention to ensure that children who have difficulties learning receive the help they need as soon as possible and that parents of children with SEN and disabilities have access to suitable childcare; removing barriers to learning, by embedding inclusive practice to every school and early years setting; Raising expectations and achievement by developing teachers’ skills and strategies for meeting the needs of children with SEN and sharpening our focus on the progress made by children with SEN; and delivering improvements in partnership taking a hands-on approach to improvement so that parents can be confident that their child will get the education they need.

Book Full text available online for free

Together from the start: practical guidance for professionals working with disabled children (birth to 2) and their families

Authors:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills, GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
41p.
Place of publication:
Nottingham

`Where children have special needs and disabilities, it is important that identification leads directly to effective early intervention and support for families and children. This guidance is designed to improve service provision to very young disabled children and their families. Content include: assessment and early intervention; coordinating service provision, ways of working in partnership; working with children and families; planning a family-centred approach to service delivery.

Journal article

A new deal for children with special educational needs?

Author:
O'GRADY Carolyn
Journal article citation:
Coordinate, 65, May 1998, pp.5-6.
Publisher:
National Early Years Network

Reports on how the Green Paper also promotes more inclusion of children with special educational needs (SEN) within mainstream schools and more involvement of and support for parents.

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